Southern Anthology

families on the frontiers of the Old South

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Matches 3,051 to 3,065 of 3,065

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3051 Yorkist victory that resulted in the death of Edmund Beaufort, earl of Salisbury, and the capture of king Henry VI.  Neville, Richard 5th Earl of Salisbury, KG, PC (I12804)
 
3052 Yorkist, Battle of Bosworth. Deveraux, Walter 7th Baron Ferrers of Chartley, KG (I18043)
 
3053 Zebulon, Pike County Journal, Friday, January 1, 1932
Photocopied at the Pike County Library, November 2, 2002 (Dawn Hill)

Mrs. Texie Bolton, Griffin Citizen, Passes

Griffin, Ga. - Mrs. Texie Bolton, beloved citizen of Griffin, passed away at the home of her son, Ben M. Bolton, 125 Chappell Street, at an early hour Monday morning. Mrs. Bolton was struck down by an automobile in Thomaston last July 20 and had been confined to her bed every since. She was visiting her son, J.C. Bolton in Thomaston at the time. Following the accident she was brought to the Strickland Memorial Hospital here where she remained five months. Later she was taken to the home of her son here. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from New Hope Baptist church in Pike county, Rev. Mr. Howard officiating. Interment in the churchyard. Mrs. Bolton is survived by five daughters, Mrs. Roscoe Balby, Kansas City, MO., Mrs. John Bovellis, St. Louis, MO.; Mrs. L.T. Deen, Baltimore, MD.; Mrs. Florence Ade, Griffin; and Mrs. Pearl Sauley, High Point, N.C.; four sons, Ben M. Bolton, Griffin; J.W. Bolton, High Point, N.C.; H.K. Bolton, Charlotte, N.C.; and J.C. Bolton, Thomaston; four sisters, Mrs, Lina Hunter, Mrs. Lula Lynch and Mrs. Sara Warren, of Griffin; and Mrs. Nola Jones, Barnesville; and two brothers, T.M. Hawkins and B.M. Hawkins, Zebulon.

 
Hawkins, Texanna (I0983)
 
3054 [1] Spalding County was created on December 20, 1851, from Fayette, Henry and Pike Counties. Pike was created on December 9, 1822 from Monroe County. Monroe was created on May 15, 1821 as a result of the Creek cession on January 8, 1821, known as the Treaty of Indian Springs. See, Abraham Griffith, McIntosh and Weatherford, pp. 208-211 (University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 1988

[2] "Clark M. Dickison" is enumerated in the 1840 Census of Pike County, 545th District, Georgia (p. 127) with the following household members: one male under 5 (probably John); one male 10-15 years of age (probably James); one male 30-40; One female under 5; two females 5-10; one female 10-15 (probably Amanda); and one female 30-40. There is a total of 28 members (counting slaves) in the household.

[3] "Clark M. Dickerson" is enumerated in the 1850 Census of Pike County, 68th District, Georgia (p. 205) with the following household members: Mary E. (age 48); James A. (age 20); Susan A. (age 16); Elizabeth (age 14); John (age 12); Joel (age 10); Clark A. (age 8); Mary (age 5); Amanda Leak (age 18); and Alexander Leak (age 1).

[4] "C. M. Dickinson" is enumerated in the 1860 Census of Spalding County, Mount Zion District, Georgia (p. 278) with the following household members: Mary E. (age 58); John (age 20); Elizabeth (age 21?); Clark (age 16); and Mary (age 12). The enumeration of the household of Sam Leak (Amanda's family) follows.

[5] C. M. Dickinson is listed as a member of the first grand jury drawn in Spalding County, 1852. Quimby Melton, Jr., History of Griffin, Georgia 1840-1940 (Griffin, Georgia: Hometown Press, 1940) p. 36.

[6] The appraisal of the estate of Clark M. Dickinson is recorded at the Spalding County, Georgia courthouse, Minute Book 1852-1870, p. 246 (19 February 1864). McDowell is listed as the administrator of the estate.

[7] "Joe Dickenson, a colored man, one of a large family of brothers, died on Sunday morning on the Freeman lot and his remains were entombed on Monday. Joe died a pauper, without money to buy a coffin or hire a hearse, or as to that, to purchase a shroud. He used to belong to Clark M. Dickerson, Sr...." The Weekly News, July 18, 1884, reproduced at Fred R. Hartz and Emilie K. Hartz, Marriage and Death Notices From the Griffin (Georgia) Weekly News and The Griffin Weekly News and Sun, 1882-1896 (Vidalia, Georgia: The Gwendolyn Press), 34.

[8] Hancock County: Wills & Estates: Account of Sales of the perishable property of George D. Lewis dec?d 26th February 1830. Purchaser of pen shucks. Brother Alpheus is also listed as a purchaser of estate property.



 
Dickinson, Clark Morgan (I0066)
 
3055 [1] Possible death? From: Georgia Deaths 1919-1998

Name: James A Dickinson
Death Date: 09 Jul 1949
Race: W
Gender: M
County of Death: Fulton
Certificate: 14813
Age: 86 years
County of Residence: Fulton

[2] James A. Dickinson is the 37 year old head of this household in the 1900 census. His month and year of birth is given as April 1863. His wife of eight years is Amanda Johnson, born in April 1872. Three surviving children (of five) are ennumerated: Walter S., age 7; Chas. B., age 3; and Irma, age 1.

[3] James A. Dickinson Household, 1900 U. S. Census, Douglas County, Georgia, population schedule, Crumbies District, enumeration district [ED] 26, supervisor's district [SD] 5, sheet 19, page 91B, dwelling 348, family 349; National Archives micropublication T624, roll 194.

[4] In 1910, the James A. Dickinson family is located on the Adamson Mill to Douglasville Road. The ennumerated children are: Walter S., age 17; Baker, age 13; Irma, age11; James, age 4; Raymond, age 2; Roscoe, age 3 months.

[5] James A. Dickinson Household, 1910 U. S. Census, Douglas County, Georgia, population schedule, Crumbies District, enumeration district [ED] 37, supervisor's district [SD] 5, sheet 3, page 196B, dwelling 48, family 52; National Archives micropublication T624, roll 183.

[6] James A. Dickinson Household, 1930 U. S. Census, Douglas County, Georgia, Militia District 1272, enumeration district 6, Sheet number 4B, page 254, National Archives micropublication T626, roll 353. 
Dickinson, James Alpheus (I0062)
 
3056 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Aug 9, 2002, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.61029.3]

Individual: Dickinson, Walter
Birth date: Feb 13, 1906
Death date: Jan 25, 1993
Social Security #: 256-38-6016
Last residence: 30135
State of issue: GA

* * * *

Douglasville City Cemetery

This is a partial listing of the Douglasville City Cemetery. It is located at the corner of Rose Avenue and Church Street in Downtown Douglasville. This information was gathered by Reba McKelvey in 1997. This is pretty much all of the Old section on the east side of Rose Avenue. The West side is yet to be done.

Dickinson Thelma b. 11 Dec 1904 d. 3 Sept 1905
Dickinson Walter Harold b. 13 Feb 1906 d. 23 Jan 1993 Wed 20 Jan 1928
Dickinson Sara Moody b. 20 Feb 1909 d. 22 Sep 1983 Wed. 20 Jan 1928
Dickinson Larry J. b. 24 Apr 1930 d. 23 Feb 1986
Dickinson Richard Kent b. 21 July 1934 d. 21 Nov 1994
Dickinson June Hembree b. 27 June 1937  
Dickinson, Walter Harold (I1008)
 
3057 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Jan 22, 2000, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.81930.148]

Individual: Gammon, Mary
Birth date: Nov 15, 1912
Death date: Sep 1983
Social Security #: 254-01-7851
Last residence: GA 30150
State of issue: GA
Zip of last payment: 30150 
Britt, Mary (I0161)
 
3058 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Mar 2, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.11105.61]

Individual: Ashmore, Mary
Birth date: Aug 1, 1903
Death date: Feb 14, 1991
Social Security #: 256-44-8663
Last residence: 30117
State of issue: GA
[Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Jan 22, 2000, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.11105.61]

Individual: Ashmore, Mary
Birth date: Aug 1, 1903
Death date: Feb 14, 1991
Social Security #: 256-44-8663
Last residence: 30117
State of issue: GA 
Gammon, Mary Elizabeth (I0009)
 
3059 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Mar 2, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.81929.24]

Individual: Gammon, J
Birth date: Oct 5, 1913
Death date: Feb 1986
Social Security #: 259-01-7786
Last residence: GA 30150
State of issue: GA 
Gammon, James Clifford (I0007)
 
3060 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Mar 2, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.81930.184]

Individual: Gammon, Millard
Birth date: Oct 13, 1907
Death date: May 1986
Social Security #: 258-28-6146
Last residence: GA 30150
State of issue: GA
Zip of last payment: 30150 
Gammon, Millard Asbury (I0006)
 
3061 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Mar 2, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.81932.50]

Individual: Gammon, Thomas
Birth date: May 2, 1910
Death date: Apr 1966
Social Security #: 252-09-4509
State of issue: GA
[Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from A through L, Date of Import: Jan 22, 2000, Internal Ref. #1.111.4.81932.50]

Individual: Gammon, Thomas
Birth date: May 2, 1910
Death date: Apr 1966
Social Security #: 252-09-4509
State of issue: GA 
Gammon, Thomas Harbert (I0013)
 
3062 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 2, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from M through Z, Date of Import: Mar 2, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.112.4.25755.134]

Individual: Moses, Rosa
Birth date: May 2, 1899
Death date: Feb 14, 1995
Social Security #: 256-44-8991
Last residence: 30182
State of issue: GA 
Gammon, Rosa Lee (I0008)
 
3063 [Brøderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 2, Ed. 4, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Social Security Death Index, Surnames from M through Z, Date of Import: Mar 2, 1997, Internal Ref. #1.112.4.71967.145]

Individual: Shell, Lillie
Birth date: Aug 5, 1901
Death date: Dec 1985
Social Security #: 256-44-9107
Last residence: GA 30150
State of issue: GA 
Gammon, Lillie (I0012)
 
3064 [DNB cont.] Apprehension of danger on the side of France soon died out before the evident anxiety of its new emperor to cultivate the friendship of England. This was so obviously his interest, and the assurance of internal peace was of such vital moment to France at this moment, that credit was given, if not to his good will, at least to his necessities. But already an uneasy feeling was abroad as to the hostile intentions of Russia towards Turkey, to which England could not be indifferent. The country, therefore, was well pleased when a government combining apparently all the elements of strength was formed under Lord Aberdeen, and it saw with satisfaction the efforts which were made to put both the forces upon a more satisfactory footing. On the prince's suggestion a camp for the training of troops to the incidents of life in the field was formed at Chobham Common. He also pressed on the government the idea of a permanent camp of instruction, which ultimately led to the establishment of the camp at Aldershot. The prince paid frequent visits during 1853 to the camp at Chobham, and watched the training of the troops for the work of actual warfare, in which its preparatory discipline was soon afterwards to be tested. The spectacle also (11 Aug. 1863) of a review at Spithead of 'the finest fleet, perhaps, which England ever fitted out, forty ships of war of all kinds, all moved by steam except three,' gave him intense satisfaction. 'I speak of it,' he writes to Stockmar (16 Aug.), 'because last autumn we were bewailing our defenceless state, and because I must rejoice to see that achieved which I had struggled so long and hard to effect.' The feeling was. natural, as he saw that England was at this time drifting into war with Russia. He had never been deceived, as Lord Aberdeen had been, into trusting Russia's protestations. 'We must deal with our enemies as honourable men,' he writes to Stockmar (27 Sept.), 'and deal honourably towards them ; but that is no reason why we should think they are so in fact ; this is what Aberdeen does, and maintains that it is right to do.' The prince was alive to the danger of not letting the Emperor Nicholas see betimes that his designs of aggrandisement were seen through, and, if persisted in, would bring England into the field. The vacillating policy of Lord Aberdeen pained him ; but so little was the prince's character then understood that the most bitter attacks were made against him as sympathising with the schemes of Russian ambition, and as an evil influence working behind the throne to thwart the policy in her majesty's government. So far were these carried that it was for a time currently believed that he had been impeached for treason and committed to the Tower. These calumnies had the good effect of forcing from ministers, both past and present, on tho meeting of parliament (31 Jan. 1854), the fullest vindication of the way in which the prince had used his position as the nearest friend and private secretary of the queen, not only within strictly constitutional limits, but also to the great advantage of the nation. From this time that position was rightly understood, and successive governments eagerly availed themselves of his information, experience, and sagacity on questions of great national importance.

Throughout the Crimean war and in the arrangement of the terms of peace these were found to be of the greatest value. By none were they more frankly recognised than by Lord Palmerston, who had been at one-time by no means predisposed to regard the prince with favour. 'Till my present position,' he said to a friend some time after he had become premier in 1865, 'gave me so many opportunities of seeing his royal highness, I had no idea of his possessing such eminent qualities as he has, and how fortunate it has been for the country that the queen married such a prince.' In the remaining years of the prince's life Lord Palmerston found increasing reasons for the opinion thus expressed. They were years of great anxiety, in consequence of the state of affairs upon the Continent, the restless and vague ambition of the Emperor of the French, the struggles of Italy, ultimately triumphant, for independence, and the growing antagonism between Prussia and Austria in their struggle for supremacy in Germany. On the prince the government could at all times rely for valuable information, which was not always to he obtained through the ordinary official channels, and for the conclusions of a calm and penetrating judgment unswayed by political or party bias.

Nor was his influence less available in every movement for promoting the interests of art and science, for developing the education and improving the material welfare of the people. His speeches at meetings for promoting these objects were eagerly studied, and carried into the people's homes ideas which have since borne the best fruits. He always lifted his subject to a high level, and his life was felt to be impregnated by a noble sense of duty and a determination to do always what was right. So he won by degrees a hold upon the hearts of the English people much stronger than he was himself aware of.

His toil was unremitting. Rising at seven every morning, the day was never long enough for what he had to do. Imperceptibly the strain was undermining his health; but to the last he preserved his natural vivacity and cheerfulness. 'At breakfast and luncheon,' the queen writes (1862), 'and also at our family dinners, he sat at the top of the table, and kept us all enlivened by his interesting conversation, by his charming anecdotes, and droll stories without end of his childhood, of people at Coburg, of our good people in Scotland, which he would repeat with a wonderful power of mimicry, and at which he would himself laugh most heartily. Then he would at other times entertain us with his talk about the most interesting and important topics of the present and former days, on which it was ever a pleasure to hear him speak.'

In the strongest man there is only a limited power of endurance. If he puts the work of eighty years into forty years, there can be but one result. So it was with the prince. While yet young in years he had done the work of a long life. During the three or four last years of his life signs were not wanting, in recurring attacks of illness, that he was using up his physical resources too rapidly. He had doubtless an inward feeling that this was so, and that the end might not be far off. Shortly before his last illness he said to the queen, 'I do not cling to life, I set no store by it. If I knew that those I love were well cared far, I should be quite ready to die to-morrow.' Very significant were the words which followed: 'I am sure if I had a severe illness I should give up at once, I would not struggle for life.' His old friend Stockmar had said many years before that any severe fever would kill him. The prediction proved true. Early in November 1861 the prince showed signs of serious indisposition. Persistent sleeplessness was one of the worst symptoms. With his usual energy he struggled on at his multifarious pursuits. The last of his political acts was one which will always be remembered to his honour, for it was probably instrumental in preventing a war with America, which threatened to arise out of the unwarrantable seizure of Messrs. Mason and Slidell, the confederate envoys, on the English steamer Trent. The draft of the despatch to be sent to the American government on the subject was submitted to the queen for consideration on the night of 30 Nov. Its terms seemed to the prince likely to cause perilous irritation. Ill as he was, he was up by seven next morning and wrote the draft of a memorandiun for the queen, pointing out his objections, and brought it to her, telling her he could scarcely hold his pen while writing it. His suggestions were adopted by Lord John Russell, and the disaster of a war was averted.

From this time onward the prince grew steadily worse. Typhoid fever was developed, and by the night of 14 Dec. 1861 his strength had run down, and calmly and gently his noble spirit was released from its burden of 'world-wearied flesh.' The event, wholly unexpected by the nation, filled it with profound sorrow. Much as it had seen in the prince to admire, it had yet to learn how much it owed to him of which it knew nothing, how deep and loyal had been his devotion to his adopted country, how pregnant for good had been his example to his family and to those on whom rest the responsibilities of governing the state, of which he had for many years been the silent stay. As this has from time to time been brought to light, the country has not been slow to acknowledge its debt of gratitude, and to assign to him a foremost place among its most honoured worthies.

[For fuller details see Sir Theodore Martin's Life of the Prince Consort.]

T. M.

 
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Albert of Prince consort of Great Britain, KG (I24371)
 
3065 Æthel is an Anglo-Saxon prefix denoting "throne-worthy." William Ætheling Duke of Normandy (I11671)
 

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