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Magna Carta

The Magna Carta gives early expression to the doctrine that became the Rule of Law. It was occasioned by John's arbitrary and capricious abuse of the English nobility: predatory practices involving inheritances, military service, and hostage taking, as well as confiscatory taxation, fees and fines. With the debacle at Bouvines, England's barons were empowered to move. Broken, John sued for peace but then appealed his concessions to Rome. "As a political tool," writes historian Thomas Asbridge, "it was defunct within three months, and by the end of the year its terms were regarded null and void by all parties." The Greatest Knight, 332. The majority of the Barons declared for Prince Louis of France who, in turn, began deploying an Anglo-French military force. The Royalists, however, were able to prevail, greatly assisted by the death of John and the accession of his nine-year-old heir, Henry III.

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File namemagna_carta_1215.jpg
File Size425.71k
Dimensions800 x 1486
Linked toJohn I, King of England (Political); Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk (Political); Henry de Bohun, 1st Earl of Hereford, Lord High Constable of England (Political); Gilbert de Clare, 4th Earl of Hereford, 5th Earl of Gloucester (Political); Richard de Clare, 3rd Earl of Hereford (Political); John de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln (Political); Geoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd Earl of Essex (Political); William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (Political); William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, Master Marshal (Political); William de Mowbray, 6th Baron Thirsk, 4th Baron Mowbray (Political); Saher IV de Quincy, Earl of Winchester ; Robert de Vere, 3rd Earl of Oxford (Political); William IV de Warenne, Earl of Surrey (Political)

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