Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Sehoy II Marchand

Female


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  • Name Sehoy II Marchand 
    Gender Female 
    Notes 
    • Arturo O'Neil identifies Sehoy as "a sister of the Indian chief Red Shoes...." Letter to Josef de Ezpeleta, 19 Oct 1783. [1]
    Person ID I5040  Dickinson
    Last Modified 26 May 2011 

    Father Jean Baptiste Louis DeCourtel Marchand 
    Mother Sehoy I 
    Married 1720  Wetumpka, Elmore, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Notes 
    • In correspondence with Albert Pickett, Thomas S. Woodward somewhat warmly denies that Sehoy II father was Marchand. He claims that Sehoy II was a full-blooded Tuskegee. "I speak nothing but the truth when I tell you," he writes, "that I know my opportunities for information on this subject have been much better than yours." Contemporary historians, Edward J. Cashin and Mary Ann Neely, are also nay-sayers. Amos J. Wright, however, marshals the primary source materials. For instance, Zespedes wrote Galvez on 16 Aug 1784 that Alexander McGillivray (Sehoy II's son by Lachlan McGillivray) was "as a quarter Indian Englishman". LeClerc Milford, McGillivray's brother-in-law, also understood that Sehoy I consorted with the French commandant of Ft. Toulouse. [3, 4]
    Family ID F1353  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Augustus McPherson 
    Notes 
    • Thomas Woodward identifies the first husband of Sehoy II Marchand (and grandfather of David Tate) as Malcolm McPherson. Woodward alleges that McPherson gave Lachlan McGillivray his start in business. (However, it currently accepted that Lachlan McGillivray was sponsored by the South Carolina trading house of his McGillivray kin.) The passage also repeats the commonly accepted story that John Tate (who also allegedly first accompanied Lachlan into the Creek nation) married Sehoy III and was the father of David Tate. As summarized on the Tate/McPherson pages, Amos J. Wright has raised serious questions about the existence of John Tate. For example, Woodward's story of Tate's death is too similar to that of David Tait's aborted Savannah expedition in 1779/1780 to be dismissed as coincidence. The confusion is disconcerting, to say the least.

      Wright argues that Sehoy II's first husband was Augustus or Angus McPherson and that Malcolm, the chief of the Hickory Ground who died 1 Jul 1799, was their son. As to the former, Wright identifies August as the only licensed Creek trader by that name who was active in the nation at the time. As to the latter, Wright maintains this is corroborated by the mention of various contemporaries (including Alexander himself) that Alexander McGillivray had a half-brother named McPherson.
      [5, 6]
    Children 
    +1. Sehoy III McPherson
     2. Malcolm McPherson
    Last Modified 26 Apr 2010 
    Family ID F1352  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Lachlan Lia McGillivray,   b. 1719, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1799, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Children 
    +1. Sophia McGillivray,   b. Abt 1746, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Jeanette McGillivray,   b. Abt 1748, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1799, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 51 years)
    +3. Alexander McGillivray,   b. 15 Dec 1750, Wetumpka, Elmore, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Feb 1793, Pensacola, Escambia, Florida Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
    Last Modified 10 Jan 2011 
    Family ID F1355  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Histories
    The Muscogees or Creek Indians 1519-1893
    The Muscogees or Creek Indians 1519-1893
    Tarvin, Dr. Marion Elisha, Alabama Historical Quarterly (Wetumpka, Alabama: Alabama State Department of Archives and History, 1955), Vol. 17, pp. 125-134. Also includes Bartram, William, Extracts from the Travels of William Bartram, pp. 110-124.

  • Sources 
    1. [S336355] McGillivray of the Creeks, Caughey, John Walton, (Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 2007), 62.

    2. [S336311] The McGillivray and McIntosh Traders on the Old Southwest Frontier 1716-1815, Amos J. Wright, Jr., (Montgomery, Alabama: NewSouth Books, 2001), 187.

    3. [S336313] Woodward's Reminiscences of the Creek or Muscogee Indians, Thomas S. Woodward, (Montgomery, Alabama: Barrett and Wimbush, 1859), 60.

    4. [S336311] The McGillivray and McIntosh Traders on the Old Southwest Frontier 1716-1815, Amos J. Wright, Jr., (Montgomery, Alabama: NewSouth Books, 2001), 184-187.

    5. [S336313] Woodward's Reminiscences of the Creek or Muscogee Indians, Thomas S. Woodward, (Montgomery, Alabama: Barrett and Wimbush, 1859), 59.

    6. [S336311] The McGillivray and McIntosh Traders on the Old Southwest Frontier 1716-1815, Amos J. Wright, Jr., (Montgomery, Alabama: NewSouth Books, 2001), 190-194.