Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Thomas Tate Tunstall

Thomas Tate Tunstall

Male 1823 - 1918  (95 years)

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  • Name Thomas Tate Tunstall 
    Thomas Tate Tunstall
    Thomas Tate Tunstall
    Born 8 Apr 1823  Blacksher, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • A biographer gives his place of birth is given as Tate Shoals. The Tunstall house, which was built at the time of his parent's marriage, is located in present-day Blacksher.
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1850  Division 1, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Residence 1870  Township 2, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Residence 1880  Montgomery Hill, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1900  Mobile, Mobile, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Mobile Ward 8 
    Residence 1910  Mobile Ward 4, Mobile, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Died 8 Jun 1918  El Paso, El Paso, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Tate-Tunstall Family Cemetery, Blacksher, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Notes 
    • Memorial Record of Alabama, (Madison, Wisconsin: Brant & Fuller, 1893), v.2, 610-611.

      THOMAS TATE TUNSTALL was born in Baldwin county, Ala., April 8, 1823. His father was George Tunstall, a native of Virginia, who died at Montgomery Hill, Baldwin county, Ala., July 28, 1842. He was a newspaper man by profession, and once editor of the Nashville Whig, and was the first man to publish an American newspaper in the state of Florida. The paper was the Floridian, and published in Pensacola. The father of George Tunstall was Edmund Savage Tunstall, a native of Virginia, who died in the state of Kentucky, wither he had gone at an early day. The Tunstall family are lineal descendants of Sir Brian Tunstall, who was killed at the battle of Flodden Field in 1573, in the war between England and Scotland, so graphically described in Scott's Marmion, where he is styled "Tunstall of the white plume, Tunstall the undefiled." The mother of Thomas T. Tunstall was Elouisa Tate, daughter of David Tate (of Tate's Shoals, of the Alabama River), who was the son of Col. Tate of the British army, who was a native of Scotland. She was the niece of the celebrated Creek warrior, Weatherford, the hero of the Massacre of Ft. Mims, who fought with Gen. Jackson, the battles of Talledega, Tallushatchee, Emukfau and Tohopaka, and is the hero of Alexander B. Meek's poem, The Red Eagle. She died in 1878, at an advanced age. Thomas Tate Tunstall completed his education at Chapel Hill college, North Carolina. He then studied law, and distinguished himself, at the age of twenty-three, by an address to the legislature of Alabama in advocacy of the claim of citizens of Indian blood to the right of suffrage. He removed to Texas in 1851, where he practiced law several years and returned to Alabama in 1854. In 1856, he was appointed United States consul at Cadiz, Spain, by President Pierce, where he resided until 1861, when he was removed by President Lincoln. He was subsequently arrested at Tangier, Morocco (February, 1862), at the instigation of the Federal consul, and confined for days in irons till called for and carried to sea on the United States corvette, Ino. He was transferred a few days after to a merchant ship bound to Boston, where he was finally landed, the irons removed from his limbs after fifty-seven days, by a blacksmith in the United States marshal's office, and then committed to Fort Warren by order of Secretary Seward. He was subsequently released unconditionally, by order of Mr. Seward. He repaired to Washington, and after a lapse of several months, obtained a permit from Mr. Stanton, the secretary of war, to return to his home in the south. His southern blood and sympathies soon, however, got him into another dilemma. He procured a pass to run the blockade from the Confederate secretary of war, with a view to render some service to the now lost cause, when he was captured in the Federal lines and taken to the Old Capitol prison in Washington, where he was confined for six months as a sp but was finally released upon condition that he would go to Europe and remain till the war was over. He honorably abided by his parole and returned to Alabama in 1866, having been absent two years. In 1867, he went to Texas, where he remained two years, returning to Alabama in 1869, and his residence since has been divided between Baldwin county and Mobile. Since 1869, he has devoted his time and attention to life insurance and has ranked as a first-class agent. Early in President Cleveland's administration he was appointed consul to Ascension, Paraguay, but declined the position. In 1888, he was appointed consul to San Salvador, Central America, and remained there till 1890, when he was removed by President Harrison. He is a master Mason, initiated at Gilbralter in 1857. He was married January 24, 1871, to Miss Josephine Crossland, who is his present wife. They have two sons -- Thomas Tate, Jr., and Bryan, named after the gallant knight slain at the battle of Flodden. His home is now permanently in Mobile, where he is at present engaged in the government service in deepening the harbor.



    • History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama Biography, Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, editors, (Chicago, Illinois: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1921), vol 4, 1689-1690.

      TUNSTALL. TOM TATE, lawyer, U. S. consul, was born April 8, 1823, at Tate's Shoals, Baldwin County; son of George Brook and Eloisa (Tate) Tunstall (q. v.), and cousin of Mrs. Virginia Clay Clopton (q. v.). He received his education at Patrick Henry academy in Virginia, and at Chapel Hill, N. C., but left school before he was graduated and returned to Alabama in 1841. He studied law, and at the age of twenty-three years, addressed the legislature of Alabama in advocacy of the claim of citizens of Indian blood to the right of suffrage. He removed to Texas in 1851, was licensed to practice in that state and remained there until 1854, when he returned to Alabama. He was appointed U. S. consul at Cadiz, Spain, by President Pierce in 1856, and remained there until 1861, when he was removed by President Lincoin. He was arrested at Tangier, Morocco, in company with the paymaster of the C. S. A. steamer, then lying in the Bay of Gibraltar, February, 1862, was returned to the United States, and after being released returned to his home in the south. He was again captured by the Federals, when he attempted to run the blockade, and was taken to the Old Capitol prison at Washington, where he was confined for six months as a spy, but was finally released upon the condition that he would go to Europe and remain there until the war was over. After spending two years in Europe, he returned to Alabama, in 1866; in 1867, went to Texas where he remained two years; then returned to Alabama; and his residence has since been divided between Baldwin County and Mobile. In 1869, he engaged in the insurance business, and early in President Cleveland's administration, was appointed consul to Ascension, Paraguay, but declined the appointment. He was appointed consul to San Salvador, Central America, in 1888, and remained there until 1890, when he was removed by President Harrison. His last public service was that of a U. S. inspector supervising the deepening and widening of the channel in Mobile Bay. When the appropriation was exhausted and the work suspended, he retired from further participation in active life. He is a Democrat and a Mason. Married: January 24. 1871, at Camden, to Josephine Crossland, daughter of John Crossland, who lived at Camden, Wilcox County, and who was a first cousin of Gen. Braxton Bragg. Children: 1. Tom Tate, jr., El Paso, Tex.; 2. Brian, Jackson, Miss. Residence: El Paso, Tex.
    Person ID I5026  Dickinson
    Last Modified 31 Dec 2014 

    Father George Brook Tunstall,   b. 14 Dec 1793, Pittsylvania County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1842, Blacksher, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Eloisa Matilda Tate,   b. 28 Nov 1802, Blacksher, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 May 1875, Mobile, Mobile, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 04 Jul 1822  Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1349  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Josephine Crossland,   b. 1848, Wilcox County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 May 1895, Mobile, Mobile, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Married 24 Jan 1871  Camden, Wilcox, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Children 
    +1. Thomas Tate Tunstall,   b. 07 Jul 1878, Montgomery Hill, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Aug 1936, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
    +2. Brian Tunstall,   b. 05 Dec 1879, Montgomery Hill, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 1 Sep 2011 
    Family ID F1440  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 8 Apr 1823 - Blacksher, Baldwin, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1880 - Montgomery Hill, Baldwin, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Mobile Ward 8 - 1900 - Mobile, Mobile, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 8 Jun 1918 - El Paso, El Paso, Texas Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Tate-Tunstall Family Cemetery, Blacksher, Baldwin, Alabama Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    Tunstall, Thomas Tate
    NARA M1104. Eastern Cherokee Applications of the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1909. Application Number: 30048.
    Tunstall, Thomas, et. al
    Tunstall, Thomas, et. al
    Alabama Act for the Relief of Thomas Tunstall

    Histories
    History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, vol. 4
    History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, vol. 4
    Owen, Thomas McAdory, Marie Bankhead Owen, ed., (Chicago, Illinois: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1921)
    Veterans: Confederate
    Veterans: Confederate

    We are a band of brothers, and native to the soil,
    Fighting for our Liberty with treasure, blood and toil;
    And when our rights were threaten'd, the cry rose near and far,
    Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag, that bears a Single Star!


    The Bonnie Blue Flag
    Harry Macarthy
    The Muscogees or Creek Indians 1591-1893
    The Muscogees or Creek Indians 1591-1893
    Tarvin, Dr. Marion Elisha, Alabama Historical Quarterly (Wetumpka, Alabama: Alabama State Department of Archives and History, 1955), Vol. 17, pp. 135-145.

  • Sources 
    1. [S007856] 1850 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850), Census Place: Division 1, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: M432_1; Page: 79B; Image: 267.

    2. [S013899] 1870 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1870), Census Place: Township 2, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: M593_1; Page: 236B; Image: 476; Family History Library Film: 545500.

    3. [S014080] 1880 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1880), Census Place: Montgomery Hill, Baldwin, Alabama; Roll: 1; Family History Film: 1254001; Page: 139A; Enumeration District: 1; Image: 0282.

    4. [S013029] 1900 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration), Census Place: Mobile Ward 8, Mobile, Alabama; Roll: T623_32; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 110.

    5. [S013185] 1910 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910), ensus Place: Mobile Ward 4, Mobile, Alabama; Roll: T624_27; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 90; Image: 307.

    6. [S336387] Alabama Historical Quarterly, (Wetumpka, Alabama: Alabama State Department of Archives and History), Vol. 17, p. 135.
      Tarvin, Dr. Marion Elisha, The Muscogee or Creek Indians 1519-1893