Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Konrad III von Staufen, King of Germany

Konrad III von Staufen, King of Germany[1]

Male 1093 - 1152  (59 years)

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  • Name Konrad III von Staufen 
    Crusaders
    Crusaders
    First (1095–1099); Second (1147–1149); Third or the Kings' Crusade (1189–1192); Forth (1202–1204); Fifth (1213–1221); Sixth (1228); Barons' (1239); Seventh (1248-1254); Eighth (1270); and Ninth (1271-1272).
    House of Hohenstaufen
    House of Hohenstaufen
    Suffix King of Germany 
    Born 1093 
    Gender Male 
    Military Nov 1146  Frankfurt-am-Main Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Second Crusade 
    • Bernard of Clairvaux met with Konrad to invite German participation in the Second Crusade. Rebuffed, Bernard launched a German preaching campaign that won the support of Konrad's rival, Duke Welf. [2]
    Military 28 Dec 1146  Speyer, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Konrad took the cross. 
    Second Crusade (1147 - 1149 AD)
    Second Crusade (1147 - 1149 AD)
    The Second Crusade was a recruiting coup but little else: Kings now commanded the Latin armies. The objective, however, was gauzy. The Greeks, who had invited the First Crusade to secure the eastern borders of Byzantium, were wary of a second wave of large European armies. Manuel I hurried, first Konrad and then Louis, across the Bosporus into Anatolia. The German contingent soon turned for home, victims of the inhospitable climate and bellicose inhabitants. The French fared little better. Leaving Konrad in Ephesus, Louis was harassed all the way to Adalia where his reduced force sailed for Antioch. Once in the Holy Land, Louis quarreled with the Prince of Antioch, who rightly considered Aleppo as the pressing strategic objective. Louis joined Konrad in Acre and they set their sights on Damascus. The city was subjected to a short-lived siege but quarreling (Thierry, Count of Flanders, was pushed as a candidate to rule of the city) and thirst (the army had shifted its position away from the Barada river) caused interest to wane. When Nur al-Din threatened to take the field, the crusaders decamped for home.
    Departure Sep 1148  [4
    Konrad departed the Levant for home, 
    Died 15 Feb 1152  Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Bamberg Cathedral, Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I19369  Dickinson
    Last Modified 5 Nov 2017 

    Father Friedrich I von Büren, Duke of Swabia,   b. ca. 1050,   d. 1105  (Age ~ 55 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Agnes of Germany, Dcss of Swabia, Marquess of Austria,   b. ca. 1072,   d. 24 Sep 1143  (Age ~ 71 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Family ID F4614  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Gertrud von Sulzbach, Queen consort of Germany,   d. 14 Apr 1146, Bad Hersfeld, Hersfeld-Rotenburg, Kassel, Hesse, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Before 1134 
    Last Modified 7 Oct 2017 
    Family ID F6061  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Second Crusade - Nov 1146 - Frankfurt-am-Main Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Konrad took the cross. - 28 Dec 1146 - Speyer, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Feb 1152 - Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S336463] Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, Charles Cawley, (Online: The Foundation for Medieval Genealogy at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/, 20XX), "KONRAD von Staufen, son of FRIEDRICH I Duke of Swabia [Staufen] & his wife Agnes of Germany (1093-Bamberg 15 Feb 1152, bur Bamberg Cathedral)" at http://bit.ly/2y7xbdw.

    2. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 209.

    3. [S359] The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors, Dan Jones, (New York: Viking, 2017), 75-76.
      Jones gives a summary of the German's failed campaign. "By November they had all retreated to Constantinople and its environs: hungry, sick and bloody. Attempting to cross the high, arid plains around Dorylaeum, where Byzantine territory gave way to hostile Seljuq country, the crusaders had been set upon by fast, lightly armed and lethal horsemen-archers firing arrows from the saddle." Jones, at 75.

    4. [S359] The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors, Dan Jones, (New York: Viking, 2017), 92.