Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Raymond IV de Toulouse, Comte de Toulouse[1]

Male - 1105


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  • Name Raymond IV de Toulouse 
    Suffix Comte de Toulouse 
    Gender Male 
    Military 1095  [3
    First Crusade 
    • "[Pope Urban's visit to France in 1095] primed two men who would play central roles in the coming expedition: Adhémar, bishop of Le Puy, a leading Provençal churchman and an ardent supporter of the papacy; and Count Raymond of Toulouse, southern France's richest and most powerful secular lord. * * * In his mid-fifties, Raymond was the expedition's elder statesmen; proud and obdurate, boasting wealth and far-reaching power and influence, he assumed command of the Provençal-southern French armies." [2]
    • "Raymond, Count of Toulouse, had already fought Islam in Spain; now, in old age, he dedicated himself and his vast fortune to the larger war; but a haughty temper spoiled his nobility, and avarice stained his piety." [3]
    Military 3 Jun 1098  Antakya, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Seige of Antioch 
    <i>Discovery of the Holy Lance</i>
    Discovery of the Holy Lance
    Miniature taken from Sébastien Mamerot's Overseas Passages (ca. 1474).

    Raymond became the foremost noble attached to the cult of the Sacred Lance, a relic allegedly found by Peter Bartholomew while rummaging in the Bascilica of St. Peter. (The lance was rumored that which pieced the side of Christ at Golgotha and Peter was led to it by a vision of St. Andrew.) The Franks rallied around it when they went out to break the Abbasid seige of Antioch on 28 Jun 1098. St. Andrew continued to trouble Peter along with that of the recently departed spirit of Bishop Adhémar; the shades confided that Raymond was called to lead the assembled Franks in Antioch and beyond, a classic case of "mission creep." Only rebellion within his own camp caused Raymond to abandon his contest for Antioch and push him, by fits and starts, towards Jerusalem. In Lebanon even this bid for the mantle was dealt a serious blow when Peter died after a voluntary ordeal by fire.
    Military 15 Jul 1099  Jerusalem Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Seige and Sack of Jerusalem 
    Military 1101  [6
    First Crusade, Second Expedition 
    Military 1102  Tartus, Syria Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Capture of Tortosa 
    Died 28 Feb 1105  Mont Pèlerin, Lebanon Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Mont Pèlerin or the Citadel of Raymond de Saint-Gilles
    Mont Pèlerin or the Citadel of Raymond de Saint-Gilles
    Notes 
    • Catholic Encyclopedia (1913), Volume 12, "Raymond IV, of Saint-Gilles" by Louis René Bréhier.

      Count of Toulouse and of Tripoli, b. about 1043; d. at Tripoli in 1105. He was the son of Raymond III, Pons, and in 1088 succeeded his brother, William IV, who had died without male issue. From 1066 he had been count of Rouergue, of Nimes, and of Narbonne, thus becoming one of the most powerful lords of southern France. In 1095 he received the pope, Urban II, on his own estates and took the Cross with enthusiasm, vowing never to return to his own dominions. After a pilgrimage to Chaise Dieu, he set out in October, 1096, entrusting the care of his dominions to his son Bertrand. His army was composed of Aquitanians and Provençals, the pope's legate, Adhémar of Monteil, Bishop of Le Puy, accompanying him. He traversed Lombardy and proceeded to Constantinople through the valleys of the Eastern Alps. After many a successful combat with the half-barbarous Slavs who inhabited this region, he arrived at Durazzo, where he found letters from the Emperor Alexius inviting him to Constantinople. Raymond accepted, leaving his army, which in his absence pillaged the country, and was attacked by the imperial troops. At Constantinople Raymond refused to swear allegiance to Alexius, as most of the crusading chiefs had done. He afterwards took an active part in the expedition against Jerusalem, and, notwithstanding his rivalry with Bohemond, exercised a very great influence on the course of events. He could not prevent Bohemond from taking Antioch in 1098, and out of spite against the Norman chief he became reconciled with the Emperor Alexius, to whom he restored the city of Laodicea (February, 1099). After his rupture with Bohemond, Raymond directed the great bulk of the crusaders against Jerusalem, and was actively engaged in the capture of the Holy City (8 July, 1099). He refused the title of king, and left Jerusalem to return to Constantinople in 1100. He was chosen chief of a new army of crusaders, which was destroyed by the Turks in Asia Minor. Returning to Syria in 1102, he was imprisoned at Tarsus by Tancred, and, on being released, seized Tripoli (1103), where he died two years later.

      RAYMOND D'AGUILERS, Historia Francorum qui ceperunt Jerusalem in Historiens Occidentaux des Croisades, III, 235-309; VAISSETTE, Histoire du Languedoc, II, III; CHALANDON, Essai sar le regne d'Alexis Comnene (Paris, 1900), 186-88, 205-12, 222-28; BREHIER, L'Eglise et l'Orient, Les Croisades (Paris, 1911).

      LOUIS BREHIER [8]
    Person ID I19361  Dickinson
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2017 

    Children 
    +1. Bertrand de Toulouse, Count of Tripoli,   b. ca. 1065,   d. 21 Apr 1112  (Age ~ 47 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 28 Sep 2017 
    Family ID F6040  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mathilde of Sicily,   b. 1062,   d. Before 1094  (Age 31 years) 
    Married 1080 
    Divorced 1088 
    Last Modified 28 Sep 2017 
    Family ID F6041  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Elvira Alfonso, Ctss de Toulouse,   b. ca. 1080,   d. ca. 1156  (Age ~ 76 years) 
    Married 1094 
    Children 
     1. Alphonse I Jourdain de Toulouse, Comte de Toulouse,   b. 1103, Mont Pèlerin, Lebanon Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Apr 1148, Caesarea, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years)  [Birth]
    Last Modified 28 Sep 2017 
    Family ID F6044  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Seige of Antioch - 3 Jun 1098 - Antakya, Turkey Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Seige and Sack of Jerusalem - 15 Jul 1099 - Jerusalem Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Capture of Tortosa - 1102 - Tartus, Syria Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 28 Feb 1105 - Mont Pèlerin, Lebanon Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S336463] Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, Charles Cawley, (Online: The Foundation for Medieval Genealogy at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/, 20XX), "RAYMOND de Toulouse, son of PONS Comte de Toulouse & his third wife Almodis de La Marche (-castle of Mount Pèlerin near Tripoli, Palestine 28 Feb 1105, bur Mount Pèlerin or Jerusalem)" at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#RaymondIVdied1105A.

    2. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 58, 69.

    3. [S19] The Age of Faith, Will Durant, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1950), ISBN 0-671-01200-1., 589-90.

    4. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 82ff.

    5. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 89ff.

    6. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 107.

    7. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 148.

    8. [S336459] Catholic Encyclopedia, (New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1913), [Public Domain].