Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Raymond III of Tripoli, Count of Tripoli[1, 2]

Male 1139 - 1187  (~ 48 years)


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  • Name Raymond III of Tripoli 
    Crusaders
    Crusaders
    First (1095–1099); Second (1147–1149); Third or the Kings' Crusade (1189–1192); Forth (1202–1204); Fifth (1213–1221); Sixth (1228); Barons' (1239); Seventh (1248-1254); Eighth (1270); and Ninth (1271-1272).
    Suffix Count of Tripoli 
    Born ca. 1139 
    Gender Male 
    Military Spring 1163  Beqaa Valley, Lebanon Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Battle of al-Buqaia 
    The battle of al-Buqaia
    The battle of al-Buqaia
    Nur al-Din was surprised at Al-Buqai'a al-Hosn, almost being captured and suffering a humiliating defeat. Asbridge marks this as the point at which he became truly committed to jihad. He exacted revenge shortly thereafter at Harim, crushing the armies of Antioch and Tripoli.
    Military 12 Aug 1164  Artah, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6
    Battle of Harim 
    • "The Battle of Harim (Harenc) was fought on 12 August 1164 near Artah between the forces of Nur ad-Din Zangi and a combined army from the County of Tripoli, the Principality of Antioch, the Byzantine Empire and Armenia. Nur ad-Din won a crushing victory, capturing most of the leaders of the opposing army" including Raymond. [4]
    Military 1164 - 1172  Aleppo, Syria Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Prisoner of Muslim ruler, Nur al-Din Mahmud. 
    Civil 1185  [7, 8
    Regent for the child king, Baldwin V.  
    • Raymond?s appointment as regent only created further room for maneuver against his rival, Guy of Lusignan, the young king?s stepfather.
    Military 4 Jul 1187  Hattin, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Battle of Hattin 
    • Raymond reconciled with his fellow Christians and submitted to King Guy after a brief dalliance with Saladin. At Hattin, however, he fled the field along with others, such as the Ibelins, who had opposed Guy's accession. The defeat at Hattin was total: Latin control in the Levant was reduced to the rump that was Tyre, Tripoli and Antioch. Unlike the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica entry (below), Jeffrey Lee does not paint Raymond in a flattering light: "In the final reckoning, it was Raymond who lusted after the throne; Raymond who rebelled and allied with Saladin; Ramond who deserted the crusader army at a critical point and condemned it to defeat." [9]
    Crusader States, ca. 1190
    Crusader States, ca. 1190
    After the Battle of Hattin
    The Battle of Hattin
    Battle of the Horns of Hattin
    At Hattin, Saladin won the decisive victory that ultimately resulted in the fall of Jerusalem (2 Oct 1187) and the confinement of Frankish power to the enclaves of Tyre, Tripoli and Antioch. As for the battle itself, King Guy was baited out of his staging point at Saffuriya by an attack on Tiberias and then outflanked and surrounded by a superior force in the waterless plateau around an ancient volcano known as the Horns of Hattin. Raymond III of Tripoli, Balian of Ibelin, and Reynaud of Sidon fled the field, abandoning Guy to his fate.
    Died Sep 1187  Tripoli, Lebanon Find all individuals with events at this location  [10, 11
    Notes 
    • RAYMUND OF TRIPOLI, the most famous of the descendants of Raymund of Toulouse, was a great-grandson of his eldest son Bertrand: his mother was Hodierna, a daughter of Baldwin II., and through her he was closely connected with the kings of Jerusalem. He became count of Tripoli in 1152, on the assassination of his father. In 1164 he was captured by Nureddin, and was only released in 1172 after a captivity of eight years. In 1174 he claimed the regency on behalf of Baldwin IV. (at once a minor and a leper), in virtue of his close relationship; and the claim was acknowledged. After two years the regency seems to have passed to Reginald of Chatillon; but Raymund, who had married the heiress of the county of Tiberias, continued to figure in the affairs of the kingdom. His great ability procured him enemies; for two years, 1180-1182, Baldwin IV. was induced by evil advisers to exclude him from his territories. But as Saladin grew more threatening, Raymund grew more indispensable; and in 1184 he became regent for Baldwin V., on condition that, if the king died before his majority, his successor should be determined by the great powers of the West. Raymund conducted the regency with skill, securing a truce from Saladin in II8S; but when Baldwin V. died, in 1186, all went wrong. Raymund summoned an assembly of the barons to Naplous to deliberate on the situation; but while they deliberated, the supporters of Guy de Lusignan (the husband of Baldwin IV.'s sister, Sibylla) acted, and had him crowned, in defiance of the stipulation under which Raymund had become regent. The rest of the barons came over to Guy; and Raymund, left in isolation, retired to Tiberias and negotiated a truce for himself with Saladin. His ambiguous position led contemporaries to accuse him of treasonable correspondence with Saladin; but his loyalty to the Christian cause was nobly shown in 1187, when he reconciled himself to Guy, and aided him in the battle of Hattin, which was engaged, however, in the teeth of his earnest advice. He escaped from the battle wounded, and ultimately retired to Tripoli, where he died (1187).

      In the corrupt society of the latter days of the kingdom of Jerusalem, Raymund showed himself at least as disinterested as any other man, and certainly more capable than the rest of his contemporaries. He might have saved Jerusalem, if Jerusalem could have been saved; but his was the 1/ox clarmzntis in deserto. "He is worthy of the throne, " wrote a contemporary Arabic chronicler: "he seems destined for it by nature, who has given him pre-eminent wisdom and courage." [12]
    Person ID I19311  Dickinson
    Last Modified 7 Nov 2017 

    Father Raymond II de Toulouse, Count of Tripoli,   b. ca. 1120,   d. 1152  (Age ~ 32 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Hodierne of Jerusalem, Ctss of Tripoli,   b. ca. 1118,   d. aft. 1152  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married 1131 
    Family ID F6018  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Eschiva II de Bures, Pss of Galilee, Lady of Tiberias 
    Married 1 Oct 1174  [13
    Last Modified 9 Oct 2017 
    Family ID F6062  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Battle of al-Buqaia - Spring 1163 - Beqaa Valley, Lebanon Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Prisoner of Muslim ruler, Nur al-Din Mahmud. - 1164 - 1172 - Aleppo, Syria Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - Battle of Hattin - 4 Jul 1187 - Hattin, Israel Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Sep 1187 - Tripoli, Lebanon Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S336463] Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, Charles Cawley, (Online: The Foundation for Medieval Genealogy at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/, 20XX), "RAYMOND of Tripoli ([1139/40]-Tripoli end Sep 1187)" at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TRIPOLI.htm#RaymondIIIdied1187.

    2. [S419] God's Wolf: The Life Of The Most Notorious Of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon, Jeffrey Lee, (London: Atlantic Books, 2016).
      Lee presents Raymond as a traitor to the Crusader cause and possibly the victim of Stockholm Syndrome after his long imprisonment in Aleppo.

    3. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 257-58.

    4. [S336470] Wikipedia, (Online: https://en.wikipedia.org), quoting "Battle of Harim" at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Harim.

    5. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 259.

    6. [S359] The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors, Dan Jones, (New York: Viking, 2017), 121.

    7. [S419] God's Wolf: The Life Of The Most Notorious Of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon, Jeffrey Lee, (London: Atlantic Books, 2016), 227.

    8. [S359] The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors, Dan Jones, (New York: Viking, 2017), 149.

    9. [S419] God's Wolf: The Life Of The Most Notorious Of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon, Jeffrey Lee, (London: Atlantic Books, 2016), 269ff (quotation at 277).

    10. [S419] God's Wolf: The Life Of The Most Notorious Of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon, Jeffrey Lee, (London: Atlantic Books, 2016), 279.

    11. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 393.

    12. [S398] Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Ed., (Cambridge: University of Cambridge, 1911), "Raymund of Tripoli", 22:935.

    13. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 302.