Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Raymond de Poitiers, Prince of Antioch[1, 2]

Male - 1149


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  • Name Raymond de Poitiers 
    Suffix Prince of Antioch 
    Gender Male 
    Title 1136  Antakya, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Prince of Antioch 
    The Crusader States, 1165
    The Crusader States, 1165
    Died 29 Jun 1149  Inab, Syria Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6, 7
    • The Battle of the Walled Fountain left Raymond slain and dismembered on the field and Antioch open to harassment by Nur al-Din. The Zangid threat was lifted when Baldwin III moved in force from Jerusalem.
    • "The significance of the Battle of Inab in 1149 paralleled that of the Field of Blood thirty years earlier. The Frankish principality was again deprived of a potent ruler and, with no obvious male heir apparent, left leaderless and vulnerable." [3]
    • "Future events would demonstrate that [Nur al-Din] was wholly content to leave Antioch in the faltering grip of the Franks because, neutralized as a threat in the theatre of Levantine conflict, the Latin principality served as a useful buffer state between Aleppo and Greek Byzantium. In fact in the early years of his rule, Nur al-Din's overriding concern was the conquest of Damascus." [4]
    Notes 
    • RAYMUND, prince of Antioch (1099-1149), was the son of William VI., count of Poitou. On the death of Bohemund II. of Antioch (q.v.), the principality devolved upon his daughter, Constance, a child of some three years of age (1130). Fulk, the king of Jerusalem, and, as such, guardian of Antioch, was concerned to find a husband for her, and sent envoys to England to offer her hand to Raymund, who was then at the court of Henry I. Raymund accepted the offer, and stealing in disguise through southern Italy, for fear of apprehension by Roger of Sicily, who claimed the inheritance of Antioch as cousin of Bohemund I., he reached Antioch in 1135. Here he was married to Constance by the patriarch, but not until he had done him homage and fealty. The marriage excited the indignation of Alice, the mother of Constance, who had been led by the patriarch to think that it was she whom Raymund desired to wed; and the new prince had thus to face the enmity of the princess dowager and her party. In 1137 he had also to face the 'advent of the eastern emperor, John Comnenus, who had come south partly to recover Cilicia from Leo, the prince of Armenia, but partly, also, to assert his rights over Antioch. Raymund was forced to do homage, and even to promise to cede his principality as soon as he was recompensed by a new fief, which John promised to carve for him in the Mahommedan territory to the east of Antioch. The expedition of 1138, in which Raymund joined with John, and which was to conquer this territory, naturally proved a failure: Raymund was not anxious to help the emperor to acquire new territories, when their acquisition only meant for him the loss of Antioch; and John had to return unsuccessful to Byzantium, after vainly demanding from Raymund the surrender of the citadel of Antioch. There followed a struggle between Raymund and the patriarch. Raymund was annoyed by the homage which he had been forced to pay to the patriarch in 1135; and the dubious validity of the patriarch's election offered a handle for opposition. Eventually Raymund triumphed, and the patriarch was deposed (1139). In 1142 John Comnenus returned to the attack; but Raymund refused to recognize or renew his previous submission; and John, though he ravaged the neighbourhood of Antioch, was unable to effect anything against him. When, however, Raymund demanded from Manuel, who had succeeded John in 114 3, the cession of 'some of the Cilician towns, he found that he had met his match. Manuel forced him to a humiliating visit to Constantinople, during which he renewed his oath of homage and promised to receive a Greek patriarch. The last event of importance in Raymund's life was the visit to Antioch in 1148 of Louis VII. and his wife Eleanor, Raymund's niece. Raymund sought to prevent Louis from going south to Jerusalem, and to induce him to stay in Antioch and help in the conquest of Aleppo and Caesarea. Perhaps for this end he acquired an influence overihis niece, which was by some interpreted as a guilty intimacy. At any rate Louis hastily left Antioch, and Raymund was balked in his plans. In 1149 he fell in battle during an expedition against Nureddin. Raymund is described by William of Tyre (the main authority for his career) as handsome and affable; pre-eminent in the use of arms and military experience; lfitteratorum, licet ipse illiterates esset, cullor (he caused the Chanson des chétifs to be composed); a regular churchman and a faithful husband; but headstrong, irascible and unreasonable, with too great a passion for gambling (bk. xiv. c. xXi.). For his career see Rey, in the Revue de Vorienl latin, vol. iv. (E. BR.) [8]
    Person ID I19193  Dickinson
    Last Modified 5 Nov 2017 

    Father Guillaume IX d'Aquitaine, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Poitou (VII),   b. 22 Oct 1071,   d. 10 Feb 1126  (Age 54 years) 
    Relationship Birth 
    Mother Amauberge-Dangereuse, Viscountess of Châtellerault 
    Relationship Birth 
    Married
    • Mistress, wife of Aimery I, Vicomte de Châtellerault.
    Family ID F5987  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Constance of Antioch, Princess of Antioch,   b. ca. 1127,   d. ca. 1167  (Age ~ 40 years) 
    Married 1136  [9, 10
    Children 
    +1. Bohémond III of Antioch, Prince of Antioch,   b. ca. 1144,   d. 1201  (Age ~ 57 years)  [Birth]
    +2. Marie of Antioch, Byzantine Empress,   b. 1145,   d. 27 Aug 1182  (Age 37 years)  [Birth]
     3. Philippa of Antioch,   b. ca. 1148,   d. 1178  (Age ~ 30 years)  [Birth]
     4. Baldwin of Antioch,   d. 17 Sep 1176, Lake Beysehir, Turkey Find all individuals with events at this location  [Birth]
     5. Raymond of Antioch,   d. Bef. Sep 1181  [Birth]
    Last Modified 5 Oct 2017 
    Family ID F5985  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Sources 
    1. [S336463] Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families, Charles Cawley, (Online: The Foundation for Medieval Genealogy at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/, 20XX), "RAYMOND (Toulouse ---- -killed in battle near Inab 28 Jun 1149" at http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/AQUITAINE.htm#Raymonddied1149.

    2. [S336470] Wikipedia, (Online: https://en.wikipedia.org), "Raymond of Poitiers" at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_of_Poitiers.

    3. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 242.

    4. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 244.

    5. [S419] God's Wolf: The Life Of The Most Notorious Of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon, Jeffrey Lee, (London: Atlantic Books, 2016), 59.
      Reported by Lee as 29 Jun 1149; by Cawley as 28 Jun 1149.

    6. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 241.

    7. [S359] The Templars: The Rise and Spectacular Fall of God's Holy Warriors, Dan Jones, (New York: Viking, 2017), 95.

    8. [S398] Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Ed., (Cambridge: University of Cambridge, 1911), "Raymund of Antioch", vol. 22.

    9. [S419] God's Wolf: The Life Of The Most Notorious Of All Crusaders, Reynald de Chatillon, Jeffrey Lee, (London: Atlantic Books, 2016), 49.

    10. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 173.