Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Nicholas Carew, KG

Nicholas Carew, KG

Male 1496 - 1539  (~ 43 years)

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  • Name Nicholas Carew 
    KG Arms of Sir Nicholas Carew of Beddington in Surrey
    KG Arms of Sir Nicholas Carew of Beddington in Surrey
    Quartered arms of Sir Nicholas Carew (c.1496-1539), KG, of Beddington in Surrey, as described in Ashmole's Register of the Most Noble Order of the Garter -- 1st Carew, 2nd Hoo, 3rd Welles quartering Engayne, 4th Waterton, 5th Mohun, 6th Idron (alias Odrone), for Irish barony of "Odrone"
    Suffix KG 
    Born ca. 1496  Beddington, Surrey, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 3 Mar 1539  Tower Hill, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I17995  Dickinson
    Last Modified 29 Mar 2017 

    Family Elizabeth Bryan,   b. ca. 1500,   d. 1546  (Age ~ 46 years) 
    Last Modified 29 Mar 2017 
    Family ID F5609  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 3 Mar 1539 - Tower Hill, London, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S336447] Henry VIII: The King and His Court, Allison Weir, (New York: Ballantine iBook, 2001), Chapter 52, "A Sort of Knaves".
      "The biggest fish Cromwell netted was Sir Nicholas Carew, who had already fallen out of favour with the King after a game of bowls, when Henry had made insulting remarks, only half in jest, to him, and Carew had rashly responded in anger. When Cromwell produced apparently treasonable letters written by Carew at Beddington, the King was easily persuaded that he had been involved in the Exeter conspiracy.

      Sir Nicholas was arrested on 14 February and executed on 3 March. Chapuys was of the opinion that it was his devotion to the Lady Mary, rather than any treasonable intent, that had brought about his fall, but it appears that the King coveted his estates in Surrey, where he was in the process of creating a vast hunting domain. Beddington Park also came to Henry on Carew?s death."