Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Green Berry Bryars

Male 1814 - 1873  (59 years)


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  • Name Green Berry Bryars 
    Born 11 Jul 1814  Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1 Jun 1840  Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Residence 1850  Division 1, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Farmer 
    Residence 1860  Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Farmer 
    Residence 1870  Township 4, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Farmer 
    Died 19 Jul 1873  Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Cause: Murder 
    Buried Bryars-McGill Cemetery, Perdido, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Bryars, Green Berry
    Bryars, Green Berry
    Notes 
    • DATE OF BIRTH

      Hey John,

      Good to hear something from you. I have in my notes that the cemetery record for Green Berry has his birth date as 11 July 1814 with a note that it is probably incorrect since his father, Lazarus John Bryars, did not marry his mother, Mary Smith, until Oct of 1816. Also the 1816 census of Baldwin County gives Lazarus Bryars' household as having 2 WM over 21, 4 WM under 21, no females. It seems that Lazarus himself would have been one of the males over 21, the other one is not known (none of his known children would have been over 21 at this time so it was probably a hired hand or some other relative living with them), the 4 males under 21 would have been Lazarus, Jr., Charles, Ethelbert, and Stephen. Lazarus had not yet married Mary Smith so no females.

      I think the other date you have which is 7/11/1817 is most probably the correct one.

      I believe the information Gertrude has came from Margaret Anderson from Utah. She's a Bryars descendant who has spent many years researching the family.

      I'd like to caution you about that book by Dr. Charles Bryant, The Tensaw Country. I have found some errors in it in the family section and if you notice he does not give any documentation at all for the family section. I believe he included things people told him without verifying all of it. I know there are errors on our Franklin family. (He has the children with the wrong parents). He's also the one who gives Charles Bryars' middle name as Sizemore and on the death certificate of Benjamin Henry Bryars, he gives his father?s name as Charles Edward Bryars. I tend to think this is correct. Benjamin named one of his sons Charles Edward. I believe Dr. Bryant mixes up the wives of Lazarus. He has him married to Mary Smith (which he was) and to a ?Granny Allen?. Most people believe that Mary Smith and ?Granny? Allen are the same person. At any rate Lazarus? last wife was named Mary because there are court papers showing this. There is no marriage record to be found of Lazarus marrying an Allen after he married Mary Smith but there is a record of Mary Bryars marrying a Robert Allen in 1828.

      Jo Ann McKay [03/23/2002]

    • BRYARS-HADLEY FEUD

      DREADFUL TRAGEDY IN BALDWIN COUNTY, ALABAMA

      Partial reports of a terrible occurrence near the line of the Mobile and Montgomery Railroad reached us by telegraph from the Junction on Tuesday morning. Yesterday we were called upon by Mr. W.J. VAN KIRK, of Millvue, a surveyor, who was on duty near the scene of the tragedy, but not a witness to its occurrence. He visited the battleground, however, was present at the funeral of the victims, and gave us an intelligent report of the dreadful affair. Greenberry BRYERS and James HADLEY, two men of considerable means and both large owners of stock, had been at feud for some years in consequence of misunderstandings caused by the intermixing of their cattle which "used" in the same range. On Monday, BRYERS, Sr., with his son, Larry, was plowing about 150 yards from the house, when HADLEY, Sr., accompanied by a party of five others comprising his son, "Dink", two other sons, and his sons-in-law, Bud PRICHER and Thomas STEWART, all armed with shotguns, rode up near the fence and said they had "come to settle the matter". BRYERS and his son were unarmed, but the father, after some angry words had been exchanged, caught up a piece of pine root, a foot and a half long, and getting over the fence, his son following him, advanced toward the party. As he approached them he was shot down and instantly killed, and his son who ran to his father as he fell was instantly killed. Joseph BRYERS then came out of the house with a double barrel shotgun, but both barrels missed fire and he was shot dead. Meanwhile Dink HADLEY rode toward the house, sprang from his horse and got behind a pine tree to await the coming of another son, John BRYERS, who advanced from the house under fire with two guns. He dropped one of them and sprang to a post in the road which did not shelter more than a third of his person, and exchanged fires with Dink HADLEY about thirty yards off, the rest of the attacking party meanwhile firing on him from a distance. At his second fire HADLEY fell, and attempted to reload, but seeing BRYERS run back and get his other gun he scrambled upon his horse and rejoined his party and rode away with them, John firing into them as they left and wounding old HADLEY in the shoulder. Dink HADLEY's wound was in the knee. John was wounded in the head, arm and foot, but not dangerously? While the fight was going on near the house, Wylie, the youngest son of the BRYERS family, ran to where his father and brother Larry had fallen and was shot down, the wound being in the thigh and dangerous. The summary of the affair is a father and two sons murdered and two sons wounded, on one side; and on the other, a father and one son wounded. We are told that Mr. BRYERS was much respected being a leading man in religious affairs in the neighborhood, and that HADLEY had always been deemed a respectable person. The dead were buried on Tuesday, a large assemblage being present? Tuesday a posse of men, provided with warrants for the arrest of the murderers, went to the HADLEY settlement but found their residences deserted. The locality of these occurrences is near the Florida line, four miles west of Perdido station, or about midway between the Junction and Tensas Bridge.

      -Pensacola Gazette

      Source: Birmingham Iron Age, July 29, 1875

      * * * *

      The details of Green Berry's death are recounted at Hadley v. Alabama, 55 Ala. 31 (Ala. 1876):

      Supreme Court of Alabama.
      Hadley v. The State.
      December Term, 1876.

      Indictment for Murder.
      FROM the Circuit Court of Baldwin.
      Tried before the Hon. H. T. TOULMIN.

      *1 The defendants in this case, James Hadley and James M. Hadley, were jointly indicted and tried, together with Jesse Hadley, Thomas Stewart, and Howell Pitcher, for the murder of Green B. Bryars; pleaded not guilty to the indictment; were convicted of murder in the second degree, and sentenced to imprisonment in the penitentiary for the term of ten years, while a verdict of not guilty was returned as to the other defendants. The circumstances attending the homicide, as disclosed by the evidence adduced on the trial, are thus stated in the bill of exceptions: "There was evidence tending to show, on the part of the State, that the parties lived about seven miles apart in the northern part of Baldwin county, and were stock-raisers; that on the Saturday before the killing they (that is, James Hadley, James M. Hadley, Jesse Hadley, and Green B. Bryars) were together at the house of said Green B. Bryars, and were friendly, and parted friendly, to meet again on Monday morning, and to go to a fork two or three miles from the house, to drive out some sheep belonging to Hadley, and separate them from the sheep of said Bryars. On Monday morning, all five of the defendants came to the fence of one of Bryars's lots, which was near the road leading from, and about one hundred yards from his house. All of them were mounted except one, and all armed with guns, and were first outside of the fence, opposite said Green B. Bryars, who stood by his plow, just inside of his lot, where he had been plowing before the defendants came up. Larry Bryars, one of his sons, had been to the house for water, and had just returned to his father, whom he had been helping to plow, as the defendants came up, and was standing outside of the fence, a few steps from his father. Wiley J. Bryars, another son, came from the house towards the place where his father and the defendants were; and when he came within about thirty steps of them, the deceased had left his plow, and got over the fence, and walked a few steps in the direction of the house, when he called out, 'Boys, come here.' This call attracted the attention of John and Joseph Bryars, who were at the house, and of his wife and daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Bryars and Bettie Bryars, who were in the yard, near the gate. Immediately on the deceased calling for his boys, the defendants dismounted from their horses, and James Hadley, being about five steps from the deceased, leveled his gun at the deceased, and shot him with both barrels. The deceased fell instantly; and about the same time, James M. Hadley shot him with one barrel of his gun, and then shot the other barrel at Larry, who stood near his father; from which shot Larry fell. About the same time, all the other defendants pointed their guns in the direction of Larry and Wiley, who were in the same direction from the defendants, and fired; Larry being then down on the ground, and Wiley going towards the house. Wiley was shot in the back of the thigh and head. The deceased, Green B. Bryars, Larry, and Wiley, were dressed in their working clothes, were in their shirtsleeves, and had no arms or weapons of any sort. The evidence tended to show that the deceased, at the time he was shot, had in his left hand a small stick, about two feet long, and an inch and a half in diameter. Very soon after this shooting, Joseph Bryars started from the house, with his gun, and had reached within about fifty yards of the defendants, when he was shot in the head, and killed; and the evidence tended to show that he did not fire his gun. John Bryars was advancing a short distance behind Joseph, with two guns, and he received a shot in the arm. He immediately returned the fire, discharging both barrels of his gun, and turned to get the other gun, which he had put down, when he received a second shot in the foot. Green B. Bryars, Larry Bryars, and Joseph Bryars were all killed, and Wiley and John wounded, in a few moments of time, and within a short time, not exceeding ten minutes, after the defendants arrived there. The defendants remounted their horses, and left in the direction whence they came; and the evidence tended to show that they went towards the house of James Hadley, and from there to the woods. One Renfro testified, on the part of the State, that the defendant Pitcher was in his employ, getting timber, and came by his camp about sunrise on the morning of the killing, and told him 'that he was going to fight a duel with old man Bryars that morning, and would be back to his work about twelve o'clock that day'; that said Pitcher then left his camp, with a gun, and went in the direction of Bryars's house, which was two or three miles distant. The killing took place about eight o'clock in the morning.

      *2 There was evidence tending to show, on the part of the defense, that the defendants were at the house of said Bryars on the Saturday before the killing, and, in a conversation between him and James Hadley, reference was made to a dispute previously existing, about a sheep of Hadley's, which Bryars said Hadley had accused him of marking; and Bryars insisted on his retracting the charge, and admitting it to be a falsehood; while Hadley denied that he had said Bryars had stolen his sheep, but only that Bryars had made a mistake in marking one of his sheep. At the solicitation of James M. Hadley, they made friends, and parted as friends, and agreed to come Monday morning, and get Hadley's sheep out of 'the fork'; James Hadley saying that he would send the boys, and, Bryars insisting that he should come too, he then consented to come. Immediately after they had left, Green B. Bryars said, in the presence of one Weakley, 'James Hadley seems like he wanted to compromise and make friends; but he can't make friends with me on any consideration, unless he acknowledges that he told a lie on me. He thinks he is coming here Monday to get them sheep, but he can't do it: he either has to acknowledge he told a lie, or fight.' Larry Bryars said to a friend on Sunday evening, when taking leave of him, 'I don't know that you'll ever see me any more. The Hadleys are coming on Monday to get them sheep; but old Jim will have to take back what he said, and admit he told a lie, or there will be a fight,' or 'a fuss.' Joseph Bryars said, on Sunday, that he could not go to the house of one King, his brother-in-law, 'because the Hadleys were coming to the house on Monday morning, and there would be hell.' There was evidence tending to show on the part of the defendants, by three witnesses, that when they started Monday morning, they were prepared and furnished with provisions for two days and one night in camp; that two of them were to drive home some sheep, and the others were after cattle; that Bryars was in the field when they rode up to the fence, and advanced towards them, with a pine root, about two and a half feet long, and one and a half or two inches in diameter, and jumped on the fence with it, calling towards the house, 'Come on, boys,' or 'Come with your guns, boys,' and attacked James Hadley with the stick; and that at the same time, while Hadley was backing his mule out of the way, several discharges of guns were made to and towards the defendants from persons on the premises of Bryars, and James Hadley and James M. Hadley were shot, and the clothes of the other defendants were a good deal cut by shot; and that Green B. Bryars was not shot, nor either of the others, until after this assault and these discharges from the Bryarses, and that twelve or fifteen shots were fired in two or three minutes. There was evidence on the part of the defendants, also, tending to show that Mrs. Elizabeth Bryars, on the evening after the difficulty and the death of Green B. Bryars, made statements of details of the rencontre different from those made by her as as witness on the trial."

      *3 "D. C. Byrne, a justice of the peace in said county, who was examined as a witness for the defense, testified, that he is a native of said county, and had known Hadley all his life, who is also a native of the county, and lives about eight miles from him; that he did not know the reputation of the defendants in the community in which they live, but had never known or heard anything against them, and until this occurrence had never heard his character for peaceableness discussed; that of his own knowledge he knew nothing against them; that James Hadley, so far as he knew, was a peaceable, good man, but he could not say what his reputation for peaceableness was in the neighborhood in which he lived. The court thereupon ruled, on motion of the State, that said witness was not competent to testify as to
      the character of said Hadley, and excluded his evidence from the jury; to which ruling the defendants excepted." "When John B. Bryars was offered as a witness on the part of the State, the defendants objected to his competency as a witness, and offered to show that he was a son of the deceased, and a brother of Larry and Joseph Bryars, and had brought an action of attachment in the Circuit Court of said county for $10,000 damages, for an assault and battery on him at the time and place the deceased was killed, against all the defendants, which action was still pending. The court overruled the objection, and allowed the witness to testify; to which ruling the defendants excepted. The defendants offered to prove, on cross- examination of said witness, that he was the plaintiff in a suit against them for an assault and battery committed on him by them, being the same suit mentioned above; but the court sustained an objection to this evidence on the part of the State, and the defendants excepted. The defendants also objected to the examination of Mrs. Elizabeth Bryars, the widow of the deceased, as a witness for the State, on the ground of incompetency, and offered to show that she, as the administratrix of said deceased, had brought an action in said court against all these defendants, for $20,000 damages for the wrongful killing of said deceased, and had also brought another action in said court, as next friend for Wiley Bryars, her son, to recover $10,000 damages for an assault and battery committed on him by them at the same time and place; which said actions are still pending in said court. The court overruled the objection, and allowed the witness to testify; to which the defendants excepted. The defendants also offered to prove these facts on cross-examination of said witness, but the court sustained an objection to said evidence by the State; to which the defendants also excepted." Similar objections were made to the testimony of Wiley J. Bryars, and exceptions duly reserved to the overruling of them. "John Bryars, Wiley J. Bryars, Mrs. Elizabeth Bryars, and Bettie Bryars, were the witnesses for the State who testified as to the facts of the rencontre. After the evidence for the State was closed, the defendants offered to show the same facts as to said pending suits, claiming $70,000 in all, separately, and all together as to each of them, and to produce the full record in each case, and that their attorneys in said suits were also their attorneys in this case. But the court refused to permit the defendants to prove any or all of these facts, and excluded them from the jury; to which ruling of the court the defendants excepted."

      *4 "The court charged the jury, among other things, as follows: 'If one man shoot another with a gun, or other deadly weapon, and death ensues, the law implies, or considers, or presumes, that the act was done maliciously, and imposes upon the slayer the burthen of rebutting this presumption, unless the evidence which proves the killing itself shows it to have been done without malice. Hence, if you believe, from the evidence, that the prisoners at the bar shot Green B. Bryars with a shot gun, or other deadly weapon, and thereby caused his death, the law presumes that the act was done maliciously, and imposes upon the prisoners the burthen of rebutting this presumption, unless the evidence which proves the killing itself shows it to have been done without malice. Now, then, if you believe from the evidence that the prisoners took the life of Green B. Bryars with a shot gun, or other deadly weapon, willfully, deliberately, maliciously, and premeditatedly, as tested by what I have said to you, and you find that it was done in this county, and before the finding of this indictment, they would be guilty of murder in the first degree, and it would be your duty so to find them. Should you find them guilty of murder in the first degree,' etc. To this charge the defendants excepted."

      ALEX. MCKINSTRY and D. C. ANDERSON, for the defendants, cited the following authorities:

      1. As to error in the charge of the court--Wharton's Criminal Law, vol 1, 711, 712; Wharton on Homicide, 671; Stokes v. People, 53 N. Y. 164; Ogletree v. The State, 28 Ala. 701; Oliver v. The State, 17 Ala. 587; Martin v. The State, 47 Ala. 564; Harrington v. The State, 45 Ala. 82; Maher v. The People, 10
      Mich. 212-25; Hurd v. The People, 25 Mich. 416.

      2. As to the admissibility of Byrne's testimony as to the character of the deceased--1 Phil. Ev. 468-9, 471; 3 Ib. 482; 22 Ala. 37-41; 31 Ala. 320; 40 Ala. 211; 7 Car. & P. 298.

      3. As to the admissibility of the records of the pending civil suits, for the purposes for which they were offered--1 Stew. 399; 9 Porter, 126; 31 Ala. 32; 40 Ala. 204; 43 Ala. 339; 47 Ala. 607; 2 Halst. 220, 234.

      JNO. W. A. SANFORD, Attorney-General, for the State.


      STONE, J.

      Mr. Wharton, the able author of the works on Criminal Law, and on Homicide, has contributed an article to the "Forum," April number, 1875, in which he attempts to show that there has been a revolution in criminal law, in the matter of presumed malice. In his work on Homicide, 2d ed., 671, he asserts the same doctrine, and says, "If it be said that the use of a weapon, likely to inflict a mortal blow, implies, as a presumption of law, in its technical sense, a deadly design, this is an error; and a fortiori is it so, when it is said the use of such a weapon implies a malicious design."

      *5 Malice, design, and motive, are, as a rule, but inferential facts. They are inferred from facts and circumstances, positively proven. If direct, positive proof of them were required, it could rarely be given. Still, we know they exist; and when sufficient facts are in evidence to justify us in drawing such inference, we rest as securely in the conviction, as if it were forced upon us by positive proof. The measure of evidence, however, to justify such abiding conviction, must be very full,--so full as to exclude every other reasonable hypothesis.

      That every one must be held to intend the known onsequences of his intentional act, is a recognized canon of moral accountability, and of municipal law. Malice, as an ingredient of murder, is but a formed design, by a sane mind, to take life unlawfully, without such impending danger, to be averted thereby, as will render it excusable, and without such provocation as will repel the imputation of formed design. Hence, when life is taken by the direct use of a deadly weapon, the canon, stated above, comes to its aid; and, if there be nothing else in the transaction--no qualifying or explanatory circumstance--the conclusion is irresistible, that the killing was done pursuant to a formed design; in other words, with malice aforethought; for malice, in such connection, is but the absence of impending peril to life or member, which would excuse the homicide, and of sufficient provocation to repel the imputation of its existence.

      In Foster's Crown Law, it is said, "In every charge of murder, the fact of killing being first proved, all the circumstances of accident, necessity, or infirmity, are to be satisfactorily proved by the prisoner, unless they arise out of the evidence produced against him; for the law presumeth the fact to have been founded in malice, until the contrary appeareth; and very right it is that the law should so presume." The same doctrine is affirmed in all the older writers and adjudications on criminal law.

      Sir Wm. Blackstone (4 Com. 201) says: "We may take it for a general rule, that all homicide is malicious, and, of course, amounts to murder, unless when justified, excused, or alleviated into manslaughter; and all these circumstances of justification, excuse, or alleviation, it is incumbent on the prisoner to make out to the satisfaction of the court and jury."

      In the case of Webster v. Commonwealth, 5 Cush. 206, the case stood on the naked proof of the homicide, without any of the attendant circumstances. Ch. J. Shaw declared the law as above quoted.

      The case of People v. Schryver, 42 N. Y. 1, is a very careful and full collection and collation of authorities, English and American, and fully sustains the doctrine above declared. See, also, Tweedy v. State, 5 Iowa, 433; Silvus v. State, 22 Ohio St. 90. The case of Stokes v. The People, 53 N. Y. 164, properly understood, is not materially opposed to this view. The charge of the judge in that case invaded the province of the jury; and, in addition to this, the case was made to turn materially on the statutes of New York. The charge in that case went much beyond the principle above copied from the old authors.

      *6 The charge in the present case is precisely that which was given in the case of Murphy v. The State, 37 Ala. 142. In that case, this court held, that the charge was free from error. We are unwilling to depart from that decision, and, in doing so, from an old landmark which has, for centuries, withstood the test of time, and the combined wisdom of jurists on both sides of the Atlantic. There is a lamentable and growing laxity in the administration of the criminal law, which is seen and deplored by all good men. Life is not sufficiently cared for; its destruction not punished with sufficient severity. Until the reckless and rash are taught, by firm judges and stern juries, that the slayer of his brother can invoke the shield of elf-defense, only when, without sufficient provocation from him, his life was in peril, or his body exposed to grievous injury; that homicide by him cannot be mitigated to the lesser offense of manslaughter, unless the jury are convinced that the killing was unpremeditated, and the result of sudden passion, excited by present injury more grievous than words--we fear that the calendar of bloody crimes is destined to know no diminution in its numbers. The terrors of certain punishment are the only sure means of restraining the evil-minded.

      2. The evidence offered of the character of the accused was properly rejected. The witness admitted he did not know the general character of the prisoner in the neighborhood in which he lived. Such knowledge is a necessary predicate to the introduction of evidence of character. 1 Brick. Dig. 513, 910, 914. This knowledge of general character may be acquired, and frequently is, without hearing the subject discussed by a majority of the neighbors. Still, the witness must be able to say he knows the general character, before he can be allowed to speak of it.

      3. We can perceive no principle, or reason, why the records of the civil suits, offered in evidence, should have been received. They could not have shed any legitimate light on the merits of the renco

    Person ID I0674  Dickinson
    Last Modified 28 Jun 2018 

    Father Lazarus John Bryars,   b. ca. 1775, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1827, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years) 
    Mother Mary Smith 
    Married 04 Oct 1816  Mobile, Mobile, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 8
    Family ID F0219  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elizabeth A Houston,   b. 10 Feb 1820, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Dec 1906, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Married 9 Feb 1839  Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Matilda Jane Bryars,   b. 04 Nov 1841, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 Mar 1925, Stockton, Baldwin, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     2. Green Berry Bryars,   b. 1843, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1861, Vicksburg, Mississippi Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 18 years)
    +3. Henrietta Bryars,   b. Dec 1843, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Moriah L Bryars,   b. 1845, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
    +5. Elizabeth J Bryars,   b. 1847, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
    +6. John B Bryars,   b. Mar 1849, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Mar 1928, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 78 years)
     7. Wesley Julian Bryars,   b. 22 Nov 1849, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Feb 1924, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     8. Joseph Bryars,   b. 1852, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jul 1873, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 21 years)
     9. Emma Bryars,   b. 1854, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
    +10. Wiley Bryars,   b. 1856, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location
     11. Lazarus John Bryars,   b. 1858, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jul 1873, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 15 years)
    +12. Julia Jerusia Bryars,   b. 17 May 1861, Baldwin County, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jan 1920, Alabama Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
    Family ID F0221  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 11 Jul 1814 - Baldwin County, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 9 Feb 1839 - Baldwin County, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1 Jun 1840 - Baldwin County, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Farmer - 1860 - Baldwin County, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Murder - 19 Jul 1873 - Baldwin County, Alabama Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Bryars-McGill Cemetery, Perdido, Baldwin, Alabama Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Bryars, Green Berry
    Bryars, Green Berry
    Estate Papers
    Bryars, Green Berry
    Bryars, Green Berry
    Estate Papers

  • Sources 
    1. [S007837] Headstone, Bryars-McGill Cemetery, Perdido, Baldwin County, Alabama.
      See note on alternate date of 1817

    2. [S022760] 1840 United States Federal Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administratio, 1840n).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1840 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1840.M704, 580 rolls. , Baldwin, Alabama, roll 1, page 86.

    3. [S007856] 1850 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850.M432, 1,009 rolls. Division 1, Baldwin, Alabama, roll M432_1, page 89, image 284.

      Name: Green B Bryars
      Age: 33
      Birth Year: abt 1817
      Birthplace: Alabama
      Home in 1850: Division 1, Baldwin, Alabama, USA
      Gender: Male
      Family Number: 137

      Household Members:

      Green B Bryars 33
      Elizabeth Bryars 30
      Matilda J Bryars 9
      Grien B Bryars 8
      Henrietta Bryars 7
      Mariah E Bryars 6
      Elizabeth Bryars 5
      John B Bryars 4
      Westley Bryars 3


    4. [S014287] 1860 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860.M653, 1,438 rolls. , Baldwin, Alabama, post office Stockton, roll M653_1, page 225, image 226.

      Name: G P Bryars
      [Green Berry Bryars]
      Age: 42
      Birth Year: abt 1818
      Gender: Male
      Birth Place: Alabama
      Home in 1860: Baldwin, Alabama
      Post Office: Stockton
      Dwelling Number: 392
      Family Number: 294
      Occupation: Farmer
      Personal Estate Value: 1400

      Household Members:

      G P Bryars 42
      Elizabeth Bryars 41
      Matilda J Bryars 19
      G B Bryars 17
      Henriett Bryars 15
      Maria L Bryars 15
      Elizabeth Bryars 13
      John B Bryars 11
      Wesley Jillian Bryars 9
      Joseph Bryars 8
      Emma Bryars 6
      Wiley Bryars 4
      John L Bryars 2
      Jasper N Fletcher 23
      Robert Givens 20
      Hannel Franklin 19


    5. [S013899] 1870 United States Census, Bureau of the Census, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1870).
      Online publication - Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003.Original data - 1870.
    6. United States. Ninth Census of the United States, 1870. Washington, D.C. National Archives and Records Administration. M593, RG29, 1,761 rolls.
    7. Minnesota. Minnesota Census Schedules for 1870. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T132, RG29, 13 rolls. Township 4, Baldwin, Alabama, post office Tensas, roll 1, page 245, image 490.

      Name: Green B Bryars
      Age in 1870: 53
      Birth Year: abt 1817
      Birthplace: Alabama
      Dwelling Number: 29
      Home in 1870: Township 4, Baldwin, Alabama
      Race: White
      Gender: Male
      Occupation: Farmer
      Male Citizen over 21: Y
      Personal Estate Value: 2000
      Real Estate Value: 250
      Inferred Spouse: Elizabeth A Bryars
      Inferred Children: Mariah L Bryars
      Elizabeth Bryars
      John B Bryars
      Wesley I Bryars
      Joseph Bryars
      Emma Bryars
      Willie Bryars
      Elizabeth I Bryars
      Julia Bryars

      Household Members:

      Green B Bryars 53
      Elizabeth A Bryars 51
      Mariah L Bryars 25
      Elizabeth Bryars 24
      John B Bryars 22
      Wesley I Bryars 21
      Joseph Bryars 19
      Emma Bryars 16
      Willie Bryars 14
      Elizabeth I Bryars 12
      Julia Bryars 9


    8. [S007837] Headstone, Bryars-McGill Cemetery, Perdido, Baldwin County, Alabama.

    9. [S336357] Marriages of Mobile County, Alabama, 1813-1855, King, Clinton P., Meriem A. Barlow, (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1985), 19, 155.

    10. [S336384] Colonial Mobile : An Historical Study, Hamilton, Peter J., (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin, 1910), 557.