Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Family: Ademar V de Limoges, Viscount of Limoges / Sarah of Cornwall, Viscountess of Limoges (F6221)

m. ca. 1155


Family Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Father | Male
    Ademar V de Limoges, Viscount of Limoges

    Born     
    Died  1199   
    Buried     
    Married  ca. 1155   
    Father  Ademar IV de Comborn, Viscount of Limoges | F6222 Group Sheet 
    Mother  Marguerite de Turenne | F6222 Group Sheet 

    Mother | Female
    Sarah of Cornwall, Viscountess of Limoges

    Born     
    Died  1216   
    Buried    Saint-Yrieux de la Perche, Haute-Vienne, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France Find all individuals with events at this location
    Father  Renaud de Dunstanville, Earl of Cornwall | F6220 Group Sheet 
    Mother  Beatrice FitzWilliam | F6220 Group Sheet 

    Child 1 | Female
    Marguerite de Limoges, Ctss de Périgord

    Born  ca. 1155   
    Died     
    Buried     

    Child 2 | Male
    Ademar de Limoges

    Born     
    Died     
    Buried     

    Child 3 | Male
    Guy V de Limoges, Vicomte de Limoges

    Born     
    Died  29 Mar 1230  Avignon, Vaucluse, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried    Abbey of Saint Martial, Limoges, Haute-Vienne, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France Find all individuals with events at this location

    Child 4 | Female
    Aigline de Limoges

    Born     
    Died     
    Buried     

    Child 5 | Female
    + Humberge de Limoges, Dame de Vouvent

    Born     
    Died     
    Buried     
    Spouse  Geoffroy de Lusignan, Seigneur de Vouvent | F6244 
    Married     

    Child 6 | Female
    Marie de Limoges, Viscountess de Ventadour

    Born     
    Died     
    Buried     

    Child 7 | Male
    Guillaume de Limoges

    Born  ca. 1179   
    Died  1223   
    Buried     

  • Notes  Married:
    • "Earl Reginald's eldest daughter, Sarah, had been given in marriage to Aimar of Limoges while he was a minor in Henry II's custody. For the viscount it was an illustrious connection; in Limoges men saw Earl Reginald as a great and influential figure, a man who had helped Henry II to the English throne. And when it became clear that the earl would have no sons, it became a marriage that aroused high expectations- expectations which were disappointed when the king took Cornwall for himself. Up to this point Aimar had remained loyal to the Old King. He had helped to entertain Henry and a vast gathering of kings and nobles for seven day at Limoges in February 1173 and had held aloof from the revolts of 1168 and 1173-4. In 1176 he suddenly changed his line. He went over to opposition and on and off pursued this new policy until his death in 1199. In 1175-6 Henry's obsessive concern for John, revealed again and again in the last sixteen years of his reign, drove Aimar of Limoges to rebellion. When he became king, Richard - too generous to John perhaps - failed to find a means of reconciling Aimar, and in the end it was while laying siege to one of the vixcount's castles that he received his fatal wound." [1]

  • Sources 
    1. [S422] Richard I (English Monarchs Series), John Gillingham, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999), 53-4.