Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Family: Henri II de Champagne, Count of Champagne, King of Jerusalem / Isabelle I of Jerusalem, Queen of Jerusalem (F3037)

m. 5 May 1192


Family Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Father | Male
    Henri II de Champagne, Count of Champagne, King of Jerusalem

    Born  29 Jul 1166   
    Died  10 Sep 1197  Acre, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location
    Buried     
    Married  5 May 1192  [1, 2]  Tyre, Lebanon  [1, 2] Find all individuals with events at this location
    Father  Henri I de Blois, Count of Champagne | F3038 Group Sheet 
    Mother  Marie de France, Countess of Champagne | F3038 Group Sheet 

    Isabelle I of Jerusalem, Queen of JerusalemMother | Female
    Isabelle I of Jerusalem, Queen of Jerusalem

    Born  1172  Jerusalem Find all individuals with events at this location
    Died  Before May 1206   
    Buried     
    Other Spouse  Honfroy IV of Toron | F6023 
    Married  Nov 1183  Kerak Castle, al-Karak, Jordan Find all individuals with events at this location
    Other Spouse  Corrado di Monferrato, Marchese di Monferrato | F6024 
    Married  24 Nov 1190  Acre, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location
    Other Spouse  Amiery I de Lusignan, King of Cyprus | F6071 
    Married  Jan 1198  Tyre, Israel Find all individuals with events at this location
    Father  Almaric I of Jerusalem, King of Jerusalem | F6025 Group Sheet 
    Mother  Maria Komnene, Queen consort of Jerusalem | F6025 Group Sheet 

    Child 1 | Female
    Marie of Jerusalem

    Born     
    Died  Before 1205   
    Buried     

    Child 2 | Female
    + Alix of Jerusalem, Queen Consort of Cyprus

    Born  Abt 1195   
    Died  1247   
    Buried     
    Spouse  Huges I of Cyprus, King of Cyprus | F3036 
    Married  Bef Sep 1210   

    Child 3 | Female
    Philippa of Jerusalem

    Born  ca. 1195   
    Died  20 Dec 1250   
    Buried     

  • Notes  Married:
    • "[With the murder of Conrad] [t]he political situation among the Latins was in disarray. Hugh of Burgundy tried to seize control of Tyre, but he seems to have been thwarted by Conrad's widow Isabella, the heiress to the kingdom of Jerusalem. With yet another outbreak of infighting threatening, a new settlement was pushed through quickly. Count Henry of Champagne was chosen as a compromise candidate - because as nephew to both King Richard and Philip Augustus he represented Angevin and Capetian interests - and within a week he was married to Isabella and elected titular monarch of Frankish Palestine." [1]
    • "In the last few days [following the assassination] events had moved with bewildering speed. From [king of England] Richard's point of view, the outcome of it all was that, for the first time, he had all the forces of the kingdom at his disposal. If he had wished to put Henry on the throne he would have to get rid of Conrad and placate Guy - which had happened. Either he had reacted in a remarkably sure-footed way to the twists and turns of events, or some of them had been foreseen and, at the least, contingency plans had been laid. This surely applies to the decisions to recognize Conrad as king of Jerusalem and Guy as lord of Cyprus. Not surprisingly the Old French Continuations attribute the decision to arrange this marriage to Richard than to any of those at Tyre, whether Isabella, Henry or the French, and they say he took others unawares by the speed with which he moved after Conrad's death." [3]

  • Sources 
    1. [S420] The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land, Thomas Asbridge, (New York: HarperCollins, 2010), 496.

    2. [S422] Richard I (English Monarchs Series), John Gillingham, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999), 201.

    3. [S422] Richard I (English Monarchs Series), John Gillingham, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999), 201-2.