Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Notes


Matches 2,151 to 2,200 of 2,228

      «Prev «1 ... 40 41 42 43 44 45 Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
2151 Wilford Hoggatt versus Elizabeth Hoggatt, We, Adam Hollinger and Leonard Marburry, being appointed by Don Juan Antonio Bassett, Commandant of the Post of St. Stephens, to settle the dispute of property between Mr. Wilford Hoggatt and Elizabeth Hoggatt, and having heard the claim of said Elizabeth and the objections made by Wilford, are of the opinion that the said Wilford Hoggatt do immediately deliver to said Elizabeth Hoggatt two negroes, claimed by her, named "Toby" and "Jack", now at work with Mr. Gerald Byrn on the King;s eork in Pensacola; that in lieu of the negro woman sold to Mr. Kerney she shall be entitled to 21 head of cattle and $40 which she received at Natchez; that he, the said Hoggatte, shall pay to Elizabeth Hoggatt $100 for the compensation of the use of the two negro men, Toby and Jack, since she has been at Natchez. Signed: Adam Hollinger, Leonard Marburry, and Juan Antonio Bassett. 30 Nov. 1794. Book E, p. 350. Hollinger, Adam (I6470)
 
2152 Wilkes was the first of eight original counties created in the first state constitution on February 5, 1777. Oglethorpe was created on December 19, 1793 Lane, Richard Quinney (I16373)
 
2153 Will

Be it remembered that I Adam Hollinger of Washington County in the Mississippi Territory being weak in body but of sound and perfect mind and memory, and seriously considering the uncertainty of life, do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following, that is to say... First I give and bequeath unto my wife Mary Hollinger the tract of land where on I now live containing 640 acres with its appertenances, likewise all my household and kitchen furnature, plantation utensils, bedding and cloathing, together with one third part of all the other property which I may be possessed of at my decease, after my just debts are paid, of whatever kind and denomination such property may be to have and to hold the whole of the property here in before granted bequeathed and devised and distributed among my children or the body of said Mary lawfully begotten in the manner hereinafter directed with regard to my other property. to have and to hold to them severally and to their several heirs executors, Adminstrators and assigns forever.

Secondly I give and bequeath devise unto my said children the residue of all my property both real and personal of whatever kind or nature it may be appropriated to their benefit and finally divided equally among them in the following manner. It is my will that the whole of my property shall remain in my wife's hands after my decease subject to the general control and superintendance of my executors nor shall any properties be sold but by the unanimous consent of my executors and executrix, except such articles as may be raised on my plantation or by my slaves which may be sold by my executrix with the consent of either of either the executors for the support of and education of my children, or other purposes necessaryly incident to the maintenance of my property. And the more effectonlly to answer their purposes, it is my will that a good overseer be employed from time to time by my executrix and executors or any two of them, to discharge the services usually performed by overseers.

But should my said wife marry then and from the time of her marriage she shall cease to have any control over my property, except that part thereof which is hereby expressly bequeathed to her during her life, and her power as executrix shall instantly cease and determine, and my executors shall place my property in such hands, of my family, and shall require from such person or persons as they may interest with the source or any part thereof a bond or bonds with ample security for any honest and faithful care of the source, and for the due return thereof.

And it is moreover my will that my children come to the ages following, viz,... my daughters to the age of eighteen years; and my sons the age of twenty one, that they be severally entitled to receive their portions of my property thereby given, bequeathed and devised to them. That is to say should there be then living at the time the first become of age as aforesaid five children of me and my wife Mary Hollinger, or their lawful descendants, then my executrix and executors shall endeavor to make a fair estimate of the value of each species of property coming to them, according to the true meaning and intention of this my last will and testament, reckoning land one species, negroes another, cattle another, and all kind of property another, and of each of these four species of property, such child so coming of age shall have the fifth part (provided there be five of the lawful descendants then living) as nearly as circumstances will admit of and where one of the remaining four come to age as aforesaid he shall or she shall receive his or her fourth part in like manner and so of the rest, -- but should any child die and leave no children, before having received his or her portion; then such portion shall be equally divided among the surviving children or their descendants, whether already having received their portion or not. Any child having received his share shall the same to them, his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns forever.

And I hereby make, and constitute, and appoint my beloved wife Mary Hollinger executrix, and my friends Harry Toulmin and William Pierce of the said county, executors of this my last will and testament. And should either of my executors of this my last will and testament. And should either of my executors ---- unwilling to act, or having should desire to cease to do so; then I authorize them and my said executrix to appoint some good honest man to be executor in his place. And it is my desire that no appraisement be made of my property., legally due to me. And I appoint my said executrix and executors jointly guardians of my children and desire that particular attention be paid to their education and good conduct, that they may become useful and respectable members of society. In witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and seal on the ninth day of April in the year of our Lord, one thousand Eight Hundred and Eight.

Adam (his mark) Hollinger

delivered in the presence
of us the subscribing witness
Thomas J. Strong
Hardy R. Joinnigan
Robert Laird 
Hollinger, Adam (I6470)
 
2154 Will

In the name of God Amen I Josiah Cox of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina being weake of body but of perfect mind and memory and calling to mind that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this to be and no other to be my last will and testament in the manner and form following viz

First my will and desier is that my wife Juda Cox have the use of my houses lands and firnature during her lifetime then my will is that my son Edmond Cox have all my land after paying to his two sisters that is to say to Anne Overman and Charity Musgrave five hundred dollars each and my will is that all my estate be kept together during my wifes lifetime

2 Item I give to my daughter Betta Cox my two namely Eda and Kneedham valued at eleven hundred dollars

3 Item I give to my daughter Salley Peelle ney two negroes name by Cader and Dicy

4 Item I give to my daughter Pheby Marin my negroes namely Winey valued at two hundred dollars and will further is that my son John Cox take the all the residue of my estate not given away and divide equally amongs all my daughters so as to make them all equil in the distribution of my estate namely Anne Overman, Charity Musgrave, Salle Peelle, Pheby Marin, Abey Marin and Betty Cox so as they may all shear and shear alike, and my will is that my son John Coxkeep the negroes he bought of Charles and Jesse Marin that I let them have and they not be considered as a part of my estat at my death, and I do hereby constitue and appoint my two sons John Cox and Edmond Cox my sole executors to this last will and testament in witness where of I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal the 10th day of January in the year of our Lord 1819

Signed sealed and published in presents of us

Ezekiel Slocomb
Ephraim Overman


Wayne County Feby Term 1819

Then was the within will of Josiah Cox duly proved in open court by the oath of Ezekiel Slocumb a subscribing witness thereto and at the same time John
Cox
qual'd as Exo'r only

Test P. Hooks Clk



 
Cox, Josiah (I4574)
 
2155 WILL

In the Name of God Amen the Eighteenth Day Dece'r in the year of our lord Christ one thousand Seven hundred And Eighty Nine I ROBERT SIMMS SEN'R of the State of North Carolina and County of Wayne but very Sick and weak in body but of a Perfect mind and memory But Calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to Die Do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say. Principally and first of all I Give and Recommend my sole in to the hands of God that gave all and for my body I Recommend it to the earth to be buried in a Christian like and and Decent manner and as touching Such Worley estate where with it hath Pleased god to bless Me in this life I Give Devise and Dispose of the Same In manner and form following that is to say In tt Place I lend to my well beloved wife MARY SIMMS the Dwelling house land and Plantation and Griss mill house And Chicken Furnature with Negro man named ROGER and his wife CECK and one boy JACK and one boy POMPEY During her natural life and after her Death the same to be Due to my son BENJAMIN SIMMS.

Item I Give and bequeath to my well beloved son BRITAN SIMMS ten Shillings Sterling by Reason I Gave him as much before as my ability will aford.

Item I Give and bequeath to my beloved son JAMES SIMMS ten Shillings Sterling by Reason I have Gave him as mbefore as my ability will aford.

Item I Give and bequeath to my beloved Daughter KEZIAH DICKINSON ten Shillings Sterling by Reason I have Gave her as much before as my abiliwill aford.

Item I give and bequeath to my beloved Daughter MARY NEWSOM ten Shillings Sterling by Reason I have Gave her as much before as my abillity will aford.

Item I Give and bequeath to my well beloved Daughter PENNELAPY DICKINSON ten shillings Sterling by Reason I have Gave her as much before as my ability will afford.

Item I Give and bequeath to my well Beloved son ROBERT SIMMS one Negro boy Named BOSTON to him And his heirs for eaver.

Item I Give and bequeath to my well beloved Daughter SUSANNA SIMMS one Negro Gairl Named RASHEL and one horse cot by value of twenty pounda and one feather bed and furnature To her and her heirs for eaver and if she should Deceas in her manothe same to become Due to my three sons BARNES SIMMS, ABRAHAM SIMMS & BENJAMIN SIMMS.

Item I Give and bequeath to my beloved son BARNES SIMMS one Negro Boy named CHARLES and all my land on the North Side of the long field Branch to the ___ fence whereit __ the __ then Direct Cours to o__ Ground field below the Road as fair as JOHN BAREFOOTS path and than all on the North Side of the P. Path to BAREFOOT line in Cludeing all the Improovements on that part of that land to him and his heirs for eaver.

Item I Give and bequeath to my beloved son ABM. SIMMS one Negor man named JIM and one Negro boy named PETER and one feather Bed and furnature and Runs on the Road goes to the foot of Mr. JOHN BAREFOOT path and thence to the old landing on the path goes to said BAREFOOT Loine and thence along his Loine to his Corner includeing all my Land above the Road on the South Side of Mr. JOHN BAREFOOTs Path.

Item I Give and bequeath unto my beloved son BENJAMIN SIMMS one Negro garl named CHANEY to him and his Heirs for Evar.

I Constitute and appoint to my well beloved son ROBERT SIMMS my hole and sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament in Witness whereunto I set my This day and year above Ritton.

ROBT. SIMMS (Seal).

Test: BENJA. COOK (his mark) SALLEY COOK (her mark) DANIEL DICKINSON.

B. I Give and bequeath to my well Beloved Sons BARNES SIMMS, ABRAHAM SIMMS and BENJAMIN SIMMS a Certain tract of land lying on the South Side of the Cobbs old mill Branch to be equally Divided amongst them. In witness whereunto I set my hand seal this the Eighteenth Day of Decem'r one thousand seven hundred and Eighty Nine.

ROBT. SIMMS (Seal).

Test. BENJA. COOK (his mark) SALLY COOK (her mark) DANIEL DICKINSON.
 
Simms, Robert II (I0453)
 
2156 WILL

In the name of God Amen, the tenth day of January 1751, I Joel Newsum of the County of Northhampton In North Carolina being sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, thanks be given unto God therfore calling mind mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to dye, Do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say Principally and first of all I give and Recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it and my body I Recommend to the earth to be buryed in a Decent Christian burial at the Discretion of my Executors nothing doubting but at the General Reflection Shall Receive the same again by the Mighty power of God and as to Such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in this life I give __ and dispose of the same in the following manner and form:

Item: I give and bequeath unto my son Hosea Newsum my plantation whereon I now live from the Swamp running up the Branch on the East side of the Plantation to the ___ line and eight head of cattle and eight head of hogs to his liking and one bed and furniture.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my son John Newsum all the rest of the land and Eight head of Cattle and Eight hogs to his choosing and one bed and furniture.

All the rest of my Estate I give equally divided between my son David Newsum and Joel Newsome and William Newsum, and Issac Newsum and my daughter Mary Newsum and of this my last will and testament ____ and constitute, nominate, and appoint my brother William Hilyard and John Duke my whole and sole Executors Revoking and Annuling of all former wills by me heretofore made, Ratified, Confirmed, this and no other to be my last will and testament.

Signes, Sealed, Published, Pronounced, and Delivered by the said testator to be his last will and testament in the presence of us:

Signed: Joell Newsum (SEAL)

Robert Peelle (Quaker)
John Dickinson
Alexander O'Quinn

Northhampton County:
February 1752

The above written will of Joel Newsome Deceased was Exhibited into Court by John Duke one of the executors therein named and was proved by the affirmation by and oath of Robert Peele and Alexander O Quinn......"

Copy of Original Will in North Carolina Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina.


 
Newsom, Joel (I0370)
 
2157 Will

In the name of God Amen.

The fourth day of February in the year of our Lord God 1742.

I JOHN DICKINSON of North Hampton County in North Carolina Gentleman Planter being in health of Body & of Perfect mind & memory Thanks be Given unto God Therefore calling unto mind the Mortaility of my body & knowing that it is apointed for all men once to dye do make & ordain this my Last Will & Testament that is to say Principally & first of all I Recommend my Soul into the Hands of God that Gave it & for my Body I Recommend it to the Earth to be buried in a Christian like & decent manner at the Discreation of my Executers nothing doubting but at the Genearl Resurrection I Shall Receive the Same again by the mighty Power of God And as touching Such worldly Estate wherewith it hath Pleased God to bless me in this life I Give devise & dispose of the Same in the following manner & form.

Item I Give & bequeath unto my loving Wife REBECKAH DICKINSON one feather Bed & furniture & two Horses or mares & twelve Head of Cattle of her own Choosing of my ____ hole Stock of Sheep two Iron Potts & Pott Hooks & Six Pewter Basons & three Negroes Names Tone, Frank and Harry & the use of my Plantation Whereon I now live During her natural Life & after her Decease I do give devise & dispose of the aforesaid Negroes to my Son Isaac.

Item I Give & bequeath unto my Son DANIEL DICKENSON my negro named Cofee & the plantation whereon he now lives.

Item I Give & bequeath unto my Son JOHN DICKINSON the plantation whereon he now lives & five shillings Cash.

Item I Give & bequeath unto my Son DAVID DICKINSON one Negro Girl named Bess & a piece of Land lying between the Reedy Branch & JOHN HORTONs line up the Reedy Branch to the Road And So allong the Road to ANDREW IRWINGs line & down the Said Line to JOHN HORTONs Line one mare & Colt & two Cows & Calves & one feather Bed & bolster & one Pair of Blankets & one old Gun.

Item I Give and bequeath unto my Son ISAAC DICKINSON the plantation whereon I now live & three Negroes named Frank, Tony and Harry after his mothers Decease.

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter SARAH DANIEL one Cow and Calf.

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter ELIZABETH FUTREL five Shillings Virginia Currency.

Item I Give & Bequeath unto my Daughter REBECKAH NEWSOM three Cows & Calves.

Item I Give & Bequeath unto my Daughter CHARITY DICKINSON one Negro Girl named Sen.

Item I Give & Bequeath unto my Daughter MARY DICKINSON one Negro Girl named Dinah.

The Rest of my Estate I Give to be Equally Divided between my wife REBECKAH DICKENSON & DAVID DICKENSON & ISAAC DICKENSON & MARY DICKENSON & CHARITY DICKENSON & of this my Last Will& Testament I make and Constitute nominate & appoint my Sons DANIEL DICKENSON & JOHN DICKENSON my hole & Sole Executors Revoking & Anuling all former wills by me heretofore made ratified & Confirming this & no other to be my Last will & Testament.

JOHN DICKINSON (Seal)

Signed Sealed Published Pronounced & Declared by the Said Testator to be his last will & Testament in the presence of us the subscribers, viz. JOSEPH JORDAN, ROBERT PEELLE,
ISAAC PARKER
. Northampton County / August Court 1749

The within written Will of JOHN DICKINSON deceased was proved in open Court by the Oath & Affirmation of ISAAC PARKER and ROBERT PEELLE two of the subscribing witnesses thereto and at same time DANIEL DICKINSON & JOHN DICKINSON were duly Qualified Executors thereof Test. L. Edwards, Clerk Proved 24th Aug. 1749 (From Secretary of State, North Carolina Wills, 1663-1789, SS 844, John Dickinson, 1749)

 
Dickinson, John (I0328)
 
2158 Will

In the name of God Amen. I JOHN DANIEL Thirtenth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & fifty four. I JOHN DANIEL of the County of Northampton being sick and weak of body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given unto almighty god therefore calling unto mind the maortality of my body & knowing that it is appointed for all man once to dye


Do make and ordane this my Last will & testament in manner & form following that is to say.

First & principaly I give my Soul into the hands of god who Gave it me & my body & recommend to the earth to be buryed in Decent and Christian Like manner at the Discretion of my Executor here after named nothing doubting but at ye generall Resurection I shall Receive ye same againe by the mighty power of God & as touching ___ ___Estae where with it
hath pleased Got to ___ me in this Life I give ___ & bequeath to in manner & form following. Impris.

I lend my plantation to my well beloved wife SARAH DANIEL and I give my plantation to my son EZEKIEL DANIEL and if he dys without are to my son EPHRAIM DANIEL two fethor beds and furniture to my wife one pine table one chest hur choice of ___ and all ye hogs Ewes I have. ___ ___ of putor her choice ___ ____.

Item I given unto my daughter ELIZABETH DANIEL one fether bed.

Itom. I give unto my Daughter SARAH DANIEL one fether bed.

Itom. I give unto my Son JOSEPH DANIEL fifty acres of Land more or less held by a Deed of JOHN BROWN & three head of Sheep.

Itom. I give unto my son JOHN DANIEL one Sow and pigs.

Itom. I give unto my Son ABRAHAM DANIEL one gun and I give unto ABRAHAM ISAAC and EPHRAIM the Rest of my Stock Cattle and hogs. I give unto my wife SARAH DANIEL one aron pot her Choice one frying pan one Woolen one Linnin Wheal and five pounds sixteen shillings in money and five stone jugs and six pare of cards one box iron and ___ one hand mill three chears three butter pots & loom and geer ye tobacco I leave to pay ye Debts. And I give unto my Daughter ELIZABETH DANIEL one Chest 1 ___ & 1 ___ and to my Daughter SARAH DANIEL one Chest one bofet & one ___ and all moveable estate in doors and out doors to be equally divided between ABRAHAM, ISAAC & EPHRAIM DANIEL. And of this my Last will & testament I make constitute nominate ordain and appoint my well beloved wife SARAH DANIEL and my son JOHN DANIEL my whole and sole Executors revoking and disannuling all former wills by have tofore made certifying and confirming this and none other to be my last will and testament. In witness whereof have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the day and year above written.

JOHN DANIEL (his mark)

(Seal)

Signed Sealed published pronounced & declared by ye said Testator to be his last will and testament in presence of us.

SAMUEL PARKER, JOSEPH DANIEL.

Northampton County. February Court 1755. The within written will was exhibited into court and proved by the oath of the subscribing witness thereto; at same time SARAH DANIEL was qualify?d Executrix therof which on motion was ordered to be ____.


 
Daniel, John (I0475)
 
2159 Will

Will Book B
Oglethorpe County, Georgia
LDS film #1893260
July 1812

In the name of God amen, I Job Felton of the State of Georgia & County of Oglethorpe being very sick & weak in Body But of perfect mind & memory, thanks be given therefore do make & ordain this my last will & testament, that is to say principally & first of all I give & recommend my Soul unto the hands of God that give it. & for my body I recommend it to the Earth to be buried in a Christian like & decent manner at the disposition of my executors & as touching such Worldly Estate, where with it has pleased god to Bless me with in this life, I give devise & dispose of the same in the following manner & form In premise. It is my will & I do order that in the first place all my just Debts & Funeral Charges be paid & satisfied.

1st I Give & bequeath unto Amariah Felton my Son four Dollars & fifty Cents.

2nd I Give & bequeath unto Jemimiah Connel my Daughter four Dollars & fifty Cents.

3rd I Give & bequeath unto Orpha Gidion my Daughter four Dollars & fifty Cents.

4th I Give & bequeath unto Sally Denne my Daughter Ten Dollars.

5th I Give & bequeath unto Tillis Gentrey my Daughter Ten Dollars.

6th I Give & bequeath unto Senath Hembrey my Daughter Ten Dollars.

7th I Give & bequeath unto Winney Gidion my Daughter or heirs Ten Dollars.

8th I Give & bequeath unto William Felton my Son Ten Dollars.

9th I Give & bequeath unto Ruth Rainwater my Daughter Ten Dollars.

10th I Give & bequeath unto Harrel Felton my Son Ten Dollars.

11th I Give & bequeath unto Rhoda Padgett my Daughter Ten Dollars.

12th I Give & bequeath unto Rachel Browning my Daughter Ten Dollars.

13th I Give & bequeath unto Uriah Felton my Son Four Hundred Dollars to be paid with Land, Negroes, or Money.

14th I Give & bequeath unto John Felton my Son all my Tract of Land whereon I now live on the waters of Clouds Creek joining Alexander Gordon & Lewis Lester Sen. Also two Negroe Fellows named Ned, & Isaac also all the remaining personal property belonging to me except Fortimore & Gilbert & one Bed and furniture which I Lend to my Dear beloved Wife Elizabeth Felton during her life of Widowhood the Said two Negroes, Fortimore & Gilbert, Bed & Furniture to be my son John Feltons property.

Lastly I Constitute & appoint John Felton my Son my Executor and my Wife Elizabeth Felton my Executrix to this my last will & testament in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this third day of May One thousand eight hundred and Ten.

Job x Felton [seal]
his mark

Sign'd seal'd & Delivered in the presents (sic) of
Thomas Thurmond
John Lester
James Stamps
Jas Suckie

I John Lester & James Stamps do Solemnly Swear that we was the within named Job Felton did Sign Seal publish & declare the within instrument to be his last will & testament and at the time of his doing he was of Sound mind & Memory to the best of their knowledge & belief.

Sworn to & Subscribed July term 1812
James Stamps
John Lester

Receipts:

* Amariah Felton ($4.50)
* Thomas Conell ($4.50) "my wife Jemiamah Conells Legacy"
* Francy Giddeon ($4.50) "my wife Orpha Giddeons Legacy"
* Azaiah Denny ($10) "my wife Sally Dennys Legacy"
* Artha Gentry ($10) "my wife(?s) Legacy"
* James Hembree ($10) "my wife Ascnaths share of her Fathers Estate"
* Francy Gideon Junr ($5) "my part in the Legacy legacy to a Winey Gidion or heir"
* William Felton ($10)
* Solomon Rainwater ($10) "my wife Ruth Rainwaters Legacy"
* Harrel Felton ($10)
* Abraham Pagget (10) "my wife Rhoda Paggets Legacy"
* George Brown ($10) "my wife Rachel Browns Legacy"
* Uriah Felton


 
Felton, Job (I4953)
 
2160 Will dated 05 May 1601 and proved 17 June 1602 (P.C.C. 55 Montague). Newdigate, Elizabeth (I1989)
 
2161 Will dated 12 March 1846 is probated. Executors are son Levi Dickinson and wife Zilpha. Isaac is identified as a son. Dickinson, Winborn (I0304)
 
2162 Will dated 16 Sep 1854. Witnesses: E. A. Flewellen; J. G. Griggs; and L. D. Dickinson. Executors: Robert H. W. Dickinson (son); Thomas S. Sharman (son-in-law); and Joel Matthews. Dickinson, Isaac (I0287)
 
2163 Will of Drewry Allen
Pike County Georgia
Will bk. A.

In the name of God Amen, I Drewry Allen of the state of
Georgia & County of Greene, being at this time of sound
mind & memory & well knowing it is appointed for man once
to die. Do make this and ordain this my last Will &
Testament.

First- I lend to my wife Elizabeth Allen during her life
or widowhood all my estate both real & personal and after
her death or marriage to be divided in the following
manner.

Secondly- I give & bequeath to my grandchildren Pleasant
Allen, Young D. Allen, Barbara Allen, Robert Allen &
Polly Allen being the children of Josiah Allen deceased
my two negro girls Leath & Ferebe to be equally divided
among them after my death or when Pleasant Allen shall
become of lawful age and my executor may think proper.

Thirdly- I lend to Nancy Allen wife of Clement Allen
during her natural life or widowhood my four negroes
Mach, Hagar, Chaney & Sherwood & after death or marriage
my desire is that the said negroes with their increase
equally divided between the children of my son Clement
Allen deceased.

Fourthly- My desire is that my sons Stokes and Young D.
Allen take in their possession for the use of my
daughter Nancy Yarbrough my three negroes Charlotte, Dido
& Dill & that they hire them out or do what ever they
think best & give the profits of said negroes to my
daughter Nancy during her life & after her death they ---
-------- the said negroes with their increase to be
equally divided among the children of my daughter Nancy
whether they be lawful heirs or otherwise.

Fithly- I lend to my son Stokes Allen my four negroes
Drury, Lach, Joe & John during his natural life and after
his death my desire is that said negroes with their
increase be equally divided among the children of my son
Stokes Allen.

Sixthly- I give & bequeath to my grandchildren Susannah
Pyron, Drury Pyron, Luis Pyron, Charles Pyron, Elizabeth
Pyron, Josiah Pyron, Nancy Pyron & Martha Pyron the
following negroes (viz) Hannah, Isaac, Caleb, & Penny to
be equally divided among them after my death by my
executors.

Seventhly- I give & bequeath to my son Young Drury Allen
the tract of land whereon I now live to him & his heirs
forever also all my stock of cattle, horses, hogs & sheep
my household & kitchen furniture together with all my
plantation utensils of every description. I also lend to
my son Young D. Allen during his natural life my four
negroes, Booker, Dinah, Winney & Elleck & after his death
my desire is that the said negroes with their increase be
equally divided among his children & further bequeath to
Young D. Allen son of Josiah Allen my rifle ---------- to
him & his heirs forever.

Lastly- I make & appoint Stokes Allen, Young D. Allen &
Mark Jackson excecutors of this my last will & testament
in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal
this 28th day of July in the year of the Lord Christ
1823.

Drury Allen
Clayborn Anderson
Joseph Bledsoe
Jeremiah Ragan J.P.

Georgia}
Pike County} You Jeremiah Ragan & Joseph Bledsoe swear
that you saw Drury Allen sign publish and ordain this
writing to be & contain his last will & testament. That
at the time though he was of sound disposing mind &
memory and that he did it freely without compulsion to
the best of your knowledge so help you God.

Signed
Jeremiah Ragan
Joseph Bledsoe

3rd day of July 1826
H.G. Johnson Clk C.O.


http://files.usgwarchives.org/ga/pike/wills/allen.txt
 
Allen, Drewry (I2130)
 
2164 Will of Edward HOOD of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: HOOD, DICKINSON, EVANS, EVINS, BARNES, HOWELL

In the name of God Amen. I EDWARD HOOD of County of Wayne And State of no. Carolina being in Perfect mind and memory do make And ordain this my Last will and Testament as follows: I Give to my beloved wife PEACIANCE [PATIENCE] HOOD two Beds & furniture, three Cows And Calves, one mare, ten head of hogs, and all the Kitchen furniture that she brought here with her, and bridle and saddl. I lend to my wife the plantation where on I now live Deuring her life or widowhood, also one negro named Isaac and one still. I give to my daughter ANNE DICKINSON one bed and furniture and five pounds. I Give to my grand son YTHELL DICKINSON all my land lying on the south side of Junissez Swamp. I Give to my grand son ISAAC DICKINSON all my land lying on the north side of Junissez Swamp and Allso I give the said ISAAC one mare, bridle and saddle, one bed and furnitre. I Give to my grand son JOHN DICKINSON all my land lying on the west side of the road, one negro named Isaac and one still, after my wife's death or widowhood. I Give to HARRIS DICKINSON the son of my grand daughter ELIZABETH DICKINSON all my land lying on the east side of the road. I Give to my grand Daughter SARAH DICKINSON one bed and furniture. All the remainder part of my estate to be sold and my debts paid, the remainder to be equally divided between ELIZABETH DICKINSON, SARAH DICKINSON, and I do constiture and appoint ISOM EVINS and JOHN BARNES executors to this my last will and testament, in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of July 1807. EDWARD HOOD. Test: JOEL EVINS, JACOB EVINS, JORDAN HOWELL. (Proved Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Court 1811). 
Hood, Anne (I0454)
 
2165 Will of Edward HOOD of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: HOOD, DICKINSON, EVANS, EVINS, BARNES, HOWELL

In the name of God Amen. I EDWARD HOOD of County of Wayne And State of no. Carolina being in Perfect mind and memory do make And ordain this my Last will and Testament as follows: I Give to my beloved wife PEACIANCE [PATIENCE] HOOD two Beds & furniture, three Cows And Calves, one mare, ten head of hogs, and all the Kitchen furniture that she brought here with her, and bridle and saddl. I lend to my wife the plantation where on I now live Deuring her life or widowhood, also one negro named Isaac and one still. I give to my daughter ANNE DICKINSON one bed and furniture and five pounds. I Give to my grand son YTHELL DICKINSON all my land lying on the south side of Junissez Swamp. I Give to my grand son ISAAC DICKINSON all my land lying on the north side of Junissez Swamp and Allso I give the said ISAAC one mare, bridle and saddle, one bed and furnitre. I Give to my grand son JOHN DICKINSON all my land lying on the west side of the road, one negro named Isaac and one still, after my wife's death or widowhood. I Give to HARRIS DICKINSON the son of my grand daughter ELIZABETH DICKINSON all my land lying on the east side of the road. I Give to my grand Daughter SARAH DICKINSON one bed and furniture. All the remainder part of my estate to be sold and my debts paid, the remainder to be equally divided between ELIZABETH DICKINSON, SARAH DICKINSON, and I do constiture and appoint ISOM EVINS and JOHN BARNES executors to this my last will and testament, in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of July 1807. EDWARD HOOD. Test: JOEL EVINS, JACOB EVINS, JORDAN HOWELL. (Proved Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Court 1811).

* * * *

Will of Drewry BARNES of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: BARNES, JORDAN, DICKINSON, NEWSOM

State of No. Carolina - Wayne County. In the Name of almighty God I DREWRY BARNES In an Consideration of mind the mortaility of my body Knowing that it is appointed for all men once To Die I do make and ordain this my Last will and Testament that is to say first of all I Gave my Soul into the Hand of all mighty god that Gave it and my Body to be Bured in a desent Manner of my Dear Beloved wife and as Touching My Worldly Estate wherein god Hath Blest me With in this Life I Gave and Devise and Dispose of in manner and form as follows -I Lend to my Beloved wife POLY BARNES all my Land on the north Side of the Great Swamp Her Life time or Widow Hood I Lender Tom to Her Life toime or widow Hood and After Her Life or Widow Hood I Leave him Tom to be Sot free. I Give to my wife above mentioned Hime & Nigroes Named Rose Luce Henry Nancy Jurden Eshat Exum Coffe and Lisha and there Increase and all the Rest of my property What Ever as is Not wiled away in Ligecies and all my Money and Notes as Dont Take to pay my Debts and Ligicies. I Give to my Brother WILLIAM BARNES Ten Dollars. I Give to my Brother SAMUEL BARNES Twenty five Shillings. I Give to my Sister ELIZABETH NEWSOM Twenty five Shillings. I Give to my Sister MARY JORDIN Twenty five Shillings. I Give to my Brother JOHN BARNES Ten Dollars. I Give to my Sister CHRISTIAN NEWSOM Twenty five Shillings. I Give to YTHEL DICKINSON Twenty five Shillings. I Give to SILLAR BARNES Daughter of MARY JORDIN Fifty Dollars. I Now also for the good behaviour of my Negro man Named Jack I do Set him free and I Give him all my Land on the South and North Sides of the Great Swamp one Horse Named Colector all his Hogs where he feeds at the Ranow place one ox one Hoe one plow Hoe and Cutter one Riffle Set adage and Moles One Bosat after my wife Life time or widow Hood one Cow and Calf Four Head of Sheep all to be Ewes all my Sidder Cast after my wife Life time or widow Hood one Set of Black Smith Tools after my wife Life time or Widow Hood one Feather Bed and furniture I give Him Two Hundred weight of Met and Six barrels Corn. This the 10th Day of January 1816. DREWRY BARNES. I Leave JACOB HOOKS to be my Exetor for Him to See As this Nigor Jack is use with Justice and for you to be paid out of my Estate what you think is anuf to Satisfy you for your Trouble. DREWRY BARNES Proved August Court 1816.
 
Dickinson, Ythell (I0455)
 
2166 Will of Edward HOOD of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: HOOD, DICKINSON, EVANS, EVINS, BARNES, HOWELL

In the name of God Amen. I EDWARD HOOD of County of Wayne And State of no. Carolina being in Perfect mind and memory do make And ordain this my Last will and Testament as follows: I Give to my beloved wife PEACIANCE [PATIENCE] HOOD two Beds & furniture, three Cows And Calves, one mare, ten head of hogs, and all the Kitchen furniture that she brought here with her, and bridle and saddl. I lend to my wife the plantation where on I now live Deuring her life or widowhood, also one negro named Isaac and one still. I give to my daughter ANNE DICKINSON one bed and furniture and five pounds. I Give to my grand son YTHELL DICKINSON all my land lying on the south side of Junissez Swamp. I Give to my grand son ISAAC DICKINSON all my land lying on the north side of Junissez Swamp and Allso I give the said ISAAC one mare, bridle and saddle, one bed and furnitre. I Give to my grand son JOHN DICKINSON all my land lying on the west side of the road, one negro named Isaac and one still, after my wife's death or widowhood. I Give to HARRIS DICKINSON the son of my grand daughter ELIZABETH DICKINSON all my land lying on the east side of the road. I Give to my grand Daughter SARAH DICKINSON one bed and furniture. All the remainder part of my estate to be sold and my debts paid, the remainder to be equally divided between ELIZABETH DICKINSON, SARAH DICKINSON, and I do constiture and appoint ISOM EVINS and JOHN BARNES executors to this my last will and testament, in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of July 1807. EDWARD HOOD. Test: JOEL EVINS, JACOB EVINS, JORDAN HOWELL. (Proved Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Court 1811). 
Dickinson, Elizabeth (I0456)
 
2167 Will of Edward HOOD of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: HOOD, DICKINSON, EVANS, EVINS, BARNES, HOWELL

In the name of God Amen. I EDWARD HOOD of County of Wayne And State of no. Carolina being in Perfect mind and memory do make And ordain this my Last will and Testament as follows: I Give to my beloved wife PEACIANCE [PATIENCE] HOOD two Beds & furniture, three Cows And Calves, one mare, ten head of hogs, and all the Kitchen furniture that she brought here with her, and bridle and saddl. I lend to my wife the plantation where on I now live Deuring her life or widowhood, also one negro named Isaac and one still. I give to my daughter ANNE DICKINSON one bed and furniture and five pounds. I Give to my grand son YTHELL DICKINSON all my land lying on the south side of Junissez Swamp. I Give to my grand son ISAAC DICKINSON all my land lying on the north side of Junissez Swamp and Allso I give the said ISAAC one mare, bridle and saddle, one bed and furnitre. I Give to my grand son JOHN DICKINSON all my land lying on the west side of the road, one negro named Isaac and one still, after my wife's death or widowhood. I Give to HARRIS DICKINSON the son of my grand daughter ELIZABETH DICKINSON all my land lying on the east side of the road. I Give to my grand Daughter SARAH DICKINSON one bed and furniture. All the remainder part of my estate to be sold and my debts paid, the remainder to be equally divided between ELIZABETH DICKINSON, SARAH DICKINSON, and I do constiture and appoint ISOM EVINS and JOHN BARNES executors to this my last will and testament, in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of July 1807. EDWARD HOOD. Test: JOEL EVINS, JACOB EVINS, JORDAN HOWELL. (Proved Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Court 1811).

* * * *

Haywood Co., TN County History book
John J. Dickinson 1820-1880

When Isaac Shelby and Andrew Jackson signed the Chickasaw Purchase in 1818, they opened up a wide fertile plain to white settlement. During the next three decades, immigrants poured into that area from all the surrounding states. Among them was John J. Dickinson, a lad of almost ten years, who was traveling with a rather large company of related families looking for greener pastures in the "Chickasaw Lands."

During that long and difficult winter journey from their former home near what is now Selma, Alabama, John J.'s father, Isaac Dickinson, developed pneumonia and died in late January or early February of 1830 in the approximate area of Shelby County, AL. According to word-of-mouth family stories, a nephew, James Dickinson, took the body to be buried in Wayne Co., NC, where Isaac had been born, the son of David and Ann Hood Dickinson. With embalming not common practice then, we'll assume it was a very cold winter.

John J.'s mother, Martha Rogers Dickinson, with her eight children, ages 3 to 20, continued their journey with the rest of the group. She bought land along the Big Hatchie, where she reared and educated her
children and lived until her death in 1842. Of her eight children, only John J. remained permanently in Haywood County. William and Nancy Elizabeth (m Foreman) died young. Sarah (m Wm. Daniel). Rufus Wylie, Edwin Leroy, Martha Ann (m D.C. Hall), and Eliza Jane (m J. Z. Bunn) all moved further west to Dallas County, Arkansas settling finally in the Tulip and Malvern communities.

* * * *
 
Dickinson, Isaac (I0457)
 
2168 Will of Edward HOOD of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: HOOD, DICKINSON, EVANS, EVINS, BARNES, HOWELL

In the name of God Amen. I EDWARD HOOD of County of Wayne And State of no. Carolina being in Perfect mind and memory do make And ordain this my Last will and Testament as follows: I Give to my beloved wife PEACIANCE [PATIENCE] HOOD two Beds & furniture, three Cows And Calves, one mare, ten head of hogs, and all the Kitchen furniture that she brought here with her, and bridle and saddl. I lend to my wife the plantation where on I now live Deuring her life or widowhood, also one negro named Isaac and one still. I give to my daughter ANNE DICKINSON one bed and furniture and five pounds. I Give to my grand son YTHELL DICKINSON all my land lying on the south side of Junissez Swamp. I Give to my grand son ISAAC DICKINSON all my land lying on the north side of Junissez Swamp and Allso I give the said ISAAC one mare, bridle and saddle, one bed and furnitre. I Give to my grand son JOHN DICKINSON all my land lying on the west side of the road, one negro named Isaac and one still, after my wife's death or widowhood. I Give to HARRIS DICKINSON the son of my grand daughter ELIZABETH DICKINSON all my land lying on the east side of the road. I Give to my grand Daughter SARAH DICKINSON one bed and furniture. All the remainder part of my estate to be sold and my debts paid, the remainder to be equally divided between ELIZABETH DICKINSON, SARAH DICKINSON, and I do constiture and appoint ISOM EVINS and JOHN BARNES executors to this my last will and testament, in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of July 1807. EDWARD HOOD. Test: JOEL EVINS, JACOB EVINS, JORDAN HOWELL. (Proved Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Court 1811). 
Dickinson, John (I0458)
 
2169 Will of Edward HOOD of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: HOOD, DICKINSON, EVANS, EVINS, BARNES, HOWELL

In the name of God Amen. I EDWARD HOOD of County of Wayne And State of no. Carolina being in Perfect mind and memory do make And ordain this my Last will and Testament as follows: I Give to my beloved wife PEACIANCE [PATIENCE] HOOD two Beds & furniture, three Cows And Calves, one mare, ten head of hogs, and all the Kitchen furniture that she brought here with her, and bridle and saddl. I lend to my wife the plantation where on I now live Deuring her life or widowhood, also one negro named Isaac and one still. I give to my daughter ANNE DICKINSON one bed and furniture and five pounds. I Give to my grand son YTHELL DICKINSON all my land lying on the south side of Junissez Swamp. I Give to my grand son ISAAC DICKINSON all my land lying on the north side of Junissez Swamp and Allso I give the said ISAAC one mare, bridle and saddle, one bed and furnitre. I Give to my grand son JOHN DICKINSON all my land lying on the west side of the road, one negro named Isaac and one still, after my wife's death or widowhood. I Give to HARRIS DICKINSON the son of my grand daughter ELIZABETH DICKINSON all my land lying on the east side of the road. I Give to my grand Daughter SARAH DICKINSON one bed and furniture. All the remainder part of my estate to be sold and my debts paid, the remainder to be equally divided between ELIZABETH DICKINSON, SARAH DICKINSON, and I do constiture and appoint ISOM EVINS and JOHN BARNES executors to this my last will and testament, in witness where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of July 1807. EDWARD HOOD. Test: JOEL EVINS, JACOB EVINS, JORDAN HOWELL. (Proved Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Court 1811). 
Dickinson, Sarah (I0459)
 
2170 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I0461)
 
2171 Will of Elizabeth (DANIEL) DICKERSON (DICKINSON) formerly of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Wed, 02 Dec 1998

Surname: DICKERSON, DICKINSON, BARDEN, ROGERS, CLARK, SHAW

I, ELIZABETH DICKERSON, do make and publish this my last will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all other wills heretofore by me made. First I direct that my funeral expenses and all my just debts be first paid out of any money of which I may die possessed or which may first come into the hands of my Executors. Secondly It is my desire that, so long as I live, my Slaves Ceily, Washington, and Dianiha remain with me, wherever I live, and labour for my support and benefit and at my death, it is my wish, that my executor shall axpose to public sale for cash, the said negroes Ceily, Washington and Dianiha, and any increase there may be from said negroes and after selling said slaves and increase (if any there be) first to pay out of the proceeds of the sale of said negroes, to my daughter CATHARINE BARDEN and heirs, the sum of Five Hundred and Sixty Four dollars and Sixteen cents, that being the sum, which I have given to my other children. Thirdly, It is my wish, and I hereby direct my executor, after paying the above mentioned sum to CATHARINE BARDEN and her heirs, to divide any surplus there may be equally among all my children or their legal representatives. Fourthly It is my desire, that all my House hold furniture and my Black Horse be sold and the proceeds be divided among my children, but my wearing apparel I wish my three daughters, or the daughters of my daughters, in case of their death, to in herit. Lastly, I hereby nominate and appoint RUFUS ROGERS my Executor. In witness whereof I set my hand and seal the 9th January 1847. ELIZABETH (X) DICKERSON (Seal). Witnesses HUGH M. CLARK, ARCHIBALD SHAW. (Haywood Co., TN, Book D, page 252.)

Elizabeth DICKERSON was Elizabeth (DANIEL) ROGERS DICKINSON, daughter of Ephraim DANIEL and Brambley Caroline BROWN. She married (1) JONATHAN ROGERS who died in Wayne Co., married (2) ISAAC DICKINSON also of Wayne Co., who died in Alabama. Her daughter Catherine was the wife of WASDIN BARDIN/BARDEN, and another daughter SARAH ROGERS, was the widow of LEVI ROGERS who died in Wayne Co.

* * * *

Bible records of Elizabeth Daniel Rogers Dickinson born in Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Fri, 04 Dec 1998

Surname: DANIEL, ROGERS, DICKINSON, FORMAN, EDWARDS, JONES, BEAVERS, MCCARGO

THE BIBLE OF ELIZABETH (DANIEL) (ROGERS) DICKINSON

The Bible was printed by Thomas Baskett, printer to the University of Oxford, dated MDCCLII (1752). Below is an abstract of the family record pages, including annotations by the author which are numbered and keyed to the numbers in the abstracts.

[1st page from Bible "Family Records"]

(Children. of JONATHAN1 & ELIZABETH2 ROGERS)

SALLY ROGERS daughter of JONATHAN ROGERS & ELIZABETH his wife was born on the 14th day September 1788

MARTHA3 ROGERS daughter of JONATHAN ROGERS & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 16th day of July 1791

JONATHAN ROGERS son of JONATHAN ROGERS & ELIZABETH his wife was born 18th day February 1793

(Children of ISAAC4 & ELIZABETH5 DICKINSON)

JOEL DICKINSON son of ISAAC DICKINSON & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 30th day 1795

EPHRAIM DICKINSON son of ISAAC DICKINSON & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 30th day May 1797

CATHARINE DICKINSON daughter of ISAAC DICKINSON & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 1st day December 1799

ELIZABETH DICKINSON daughter of I. DICKINSON & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 22nd day Nov 1801

SHADRACK DICKINSON son of I. DICKINSON & ELIZABRETH his wife was born on 8th day November 1804

[2nd page from Bible "Family Records"]

ISAAC DICKINSON son of I. DICKINSON & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 21st day December 1806

WILLIAM ROGERS son of SALLY13 ROGERS was born on the 10th day January 1809

POLLY DICKINSON daughter of I. DICKINSON & ELIZABETH his wife was born on 10th day September 1812

RUFUS ROGERS son of SALLY ROGERS was born on the 18th day of January 1818

JONATHAN ROGERS son of SALLY ROGERS was born on the 6th day April 1820
(Ch. of E[PHRAIM] & LENORAH DICKINSON6)

REBECCA KING DICKINSON daughter of E. DICKINSON and LENORAH his wife was born February 27th 1823

(Ch. of WILLIAM & LUCINDY ROGERS7)

ISAAC LEFAYT ROGGERS son of WILLIAM ROGGERS & LUCINDY his wife was born the 26th of July 1831

LOUIS LEROY ROGERS son of WILLIAM ROGERS & LUCINDY ROGERS his wife was born Sept. the 19th 1832

[3rd page from Bible "Family Records"].

JONATHAN S. ROGERS, son of WM. ROGERS & LUCINDY ROGERS his wife was bornd May the 20th1834

BENJAMIN ROGER son of WILLIAM ROGERS and LUCINDA his wife was bornd the 1st day of August 1835

SARAH ELIZABETH ROGERS daughter of WILLIAM ROGERS & LUCINDA his wife was bornd the 25th of December 1836

JAMES ROGERS son of WILLIAM ROGERS and LUCINDA his wife was born the 16th of April 1838

ELIZABETH8, DANIEL daughter of EPHRAIM & BRAMLEY DANIEL was born November 7th 1768

ELIZABETH DICKINSON9 departed this life the 12th of July 1847.

SARAH M. W.10 DICKINSON was born the 7th day September 1810 Daughter of E[LIJAH] (FORMAN) & MARY his wife FORMAN

(Children of SHADRACK11 & SALLY12 DICKINSON)

SHADRACH P. DANIEL , son of SHADRACK DICKINSON and wife SALLY, was born April 30, 1853. Died Aug. 1, 1926

(SALLY for SARAH MILDRED)

[4th page from Bible "Family Records"]

LULA MAY, dau. of WILLIAM D. & AMANDA RUTUTN (BEAVERS) MCCARGO, b. 20 May 1860, Lincoln, AL. Married SHADRACK P. D[ANIEL] DICKINSON on 22 Dec 1881; d. 19 Jan 1938.

ANNOTATIONS
1. His estate was administered in 1793, Wayne Co., NC, estate records.

2. ELIZABETH DANIEL, dau. of EPHRAIM & BRAMBLEY DANIEL (3rd page of Bible).

3. She md. ca 1812, ISAAC DICKINSON, 1st cousin of the same name who md. her mother. About 1840, she md. JOHN JONES. A letter written in 1899 by her son, R. W. DICKINSON, notes that she d. 23 Jan. 1843.

4. He d. 1820, Montgomery Co., AL (Div. of Estate settled in Orphan's Court & recorded in Book 2, pp. 270-271.

5. She md. 1st, JONATHAN ROGERS, & 2nd, ISAAC DICKINSON ca. 1794, probably in Wayne Co., NC. She d. 12 July 1847, Haywood Co., TN (See 3rd page of Bible).

6. EPHRAIM DICKERSON & Miss LENORY EDWARDS were md. 15 Feb. 1821 in Montgomery Co., AL (Marriage Book "C", p. 243).

7. They were married in Tennessee prior to 1831, but no marriage record has been found. LUCINDY's maiden name is unknown. The 1850 Census for Haywood Co., TN, lists WILLIAM and the children as shown in the Bible plus 3 children now shown in the Bible. The wife's name is listed as MATILDA, who may be WILLIAM's 2nd wife and the mother of the 3 additional children (all born after 1840).

8. She md. 1st, JONATHAN ROGERS, & 2nd, ISAAC DICKINSON.

9. Ibid.

10. She is SARAH MILDRED FORMAN.

11. Son of ISAAC & ELIZABETH (DANIEL) (ROGERS) DICKINSON; md. SARAH M. W. FORMAN on 17 Jun 1826, Montgomery Co., AL (Marriage Book "C", p. 330).

12. SARAH MILDRED FORMAN, dau. of ELIJAH & MARY FORMAN.

13. SALLY ROGERS' husband was LEVI ROGERS who died intestate 1820 in Wayne Co., NC. EPHRAIM DANIEL, her uncle, was administrator of the estate.
 
Dickinson, Isaac (I0384)
 
2172 Will of Joel DICKINSON of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: DICKINSON, TURNER, BARNES, DANIEL

In the name of God Amen. I JOEL DICKINSON of the County of Wayne of the State of No. Carolina Being tho sick & weak in Body yet of a Sound & disposing mind thanks be to god for it Do Make & Ordain t..... saddle During her widowhood. I give to my son ISAAC three Negrows by the names of hanner & Lige & Diner to him an his ares for Ever. I give to my son MATTHEW three Negrows by the names of Simon & lusse & sealea to him and his ares for ever. I give to my daughter MARTHA three Negroes by the names of Jinne & Moses & Jim to her and her ares for Everer. I give to my Daughter CHARITY three Negroes by the Names of Luke & febery & bob to her and her ars for Ever. I give to my son ISAAC one hos cold miner Bridle & Saddle to him and his Ears for ever. I give to my son MATTHEW one mare cold fly bridle & saddle to him and his ears for Evaer. I give to my daughter CHARTEY one horse colt cold Lit bridle & saddle to her and her ars for ever. I leave one Negro man by the name of Mike to be sold & also two fille colts by the names of fil & Bl__ to be sold. I give to my sun MATTHEW the plantation whereon I now lives to him and his ares for ever. I give to my sun ISAAC that part of land beginning at the mouth of the little Branch jest a bove the old mill & running up to the head of it thence stear a strait corse to a great pond SHADRECK DICKINSON & JOEL DICKINSON Lines joins to him and his ares for Evver & also the land the north side of Contenty Cole Stoyckes to him and his ars for ever. And also after my lawful Detes is paid the Reminder to Equial Divied a mong them and I Do Constitute and appoint MATHEW TURNER & JOHN BARNES & EPHRAIM DANIEL Executors of this my last will and Testament in Witness Where of I have hereunto set my hand & seal this 19th Day of December A.D. 1792. JOEL DICKINSON. Enter Sind before me. Test: ISAAC DICKINSON, MATTHEW DICKINSON, DAVID DICKINSON. Proved April Court 1793.

* * * *

Petition for dower rights of Mary DICKINSON, widow of Joel DICKINSON

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: DICKINSON

MARY DICKINSON Widow of JOEL DICKINSON Dec'd Dower. State of North Carolina, Wayne County Court, April Term 1794. MARY DICKINSON Widow of JOEL DICKINSON Deceased vs. The Heirs and Executors of the said Deceased. Ordered that the Sheriff Summons a Jury of Good and Lawful men of his Ba____ to set of and allot to MARY DICKINSON, Widow and Relict of JOEL DICKINSON late of Wayne County Deceased, her Dower, in and to the Lands which her said Husband siezed and possessed of in Wayne County Lying on Contentnea Creek, containing about Three Hundred and Sixty Acres, as also her equal an proportionable part, of the personal Estate that her said Husband died Siezed and possessed of (with the children of the said Deceased) agreeable to the Act of Assembly in that case made and provided thereon to our next (Court together with the said Jury) at the Court House in Waynesborough on the second Modnay in July Next. Witness JAMES COBB Clerk of our siad Court at Office this 19th April AD 1795. I have summoned a Jury agreeable to this Order who met and have allotted to the Widow her Dower agreeablee to this return made, Signed by the Jury July the 1st 1795.

* * * *

Will of Matthew TURNER of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: TURNER, ROGERS, DICKINSON, LOEW, BRITT

Will of MATTHEW TURNER, son of JOSEPH TURNER, written 31 May 1801, now present in the unbound Wayne Co., NC, Wills 1780 to 1905 in Raleigh, bestowed his property on: MATTHEW TURNER, nephew and son of BENJAMIN TURNER dec'd (1795), principal legatee; PRISCILLA, ELIZABETH and SARA DICKINSON, daughters of ISAAC DICKINSON (d. 1787 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMIN DICKINSON, son of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMINE ROGARS JUNER, son of SARA ROGARS, the sister of MATTHEW: negro named Phemby; NATHAN TURNER, nephew and son of brother BENJAMIN; SARA ROGERS TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN; ELIZABETH TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN. [Note: NATHAN, SARA ROGERS, and ELIZABETH TURNER are mentioned in the will of BENJAMIN TURNER (d. 1795 in Southampton Co., VA)]; MARY LOEW, sister (first married to JOEL DICKINSON (d. 1793); MARTHA DICKINSON, sister, wife of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801); CATHERINE BRITT, sister; Heirs of SARA ROGERS, dec'd sister. 
Dickinson, Joel (I0251)
 
2173 Will of John C. Towles - 1876
Chambers County, AL
Will Book 3, Pages 445 - 448


The State of Alabama
Chambers County

The last Will and Testament of John C. Towles, of the County and State aforesaid.

I, John C. Towles, considering the uncertainty of this mortal life, and being of sound mind and memory, do make and publish this my last will and testament, in manner and form following (that is to say).

First. I resign my soul into the hands of Almighty God, hoping and believing in a remission of my sins, by the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ; And my body I commit to the earth, to be buried at the discretion of my executrix hereinafter named; And my worldly estate I give and devise as follows:

First. I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Catharine W. Towles, all that tract or parcel of land, situated, lying and being in the County of Chambers and State of Alabama, known as the NE 1/4 of Section 15, Township 22, Range 26, containing 160 acres more or less, together with all and everything thereon situate or thereunto pertaining. I further give and devise to my said wife, 40 acres of land with all the appurtenances thereunto belonging in the NW corner of the East 1/2 of Section 10, Township 22, Range 26, to be laid off in a square, said land situated in the County of Chambers and State of Alabama.

Second. I give and bequeath to my youngest son James Germany Towles, 170 acres of land, to wit: the West 1/2 of the West 1/2 of Section 11, containing 160 acres, and 10 acres to be laid off in a square in the SE corner of the East 1/2 of Section 10, all of said lands lying in Township 22, Range 26, situated in Chambers County, Alabama.

Third. I give and bequeath to my youngest daughter Susan Emily Towles, the East 1/2 of the East 1/2 of
Section 10, Township 22, Range 26, excepting the 10 acres already given to James G. Towles, containing 150 acres, situated in Chambers County, State of Alabama.

Fourth. I give and bequeath to my daughter Louisa Ann Grimmett, the West 1/2 of the East 1/2 of Section 10,
Township 22, Range 26, excepting the 40 acres given by this will elsewhere to my wife Catharine W. Towles, containing 120 acres more or less, situated in Chambers County, Alabama.

Fifth. I give and bequeath to my son William Wallace Towles, the East 1/2 of the East 1/2 of the West 1/2 of Section 11, Township 22, Range 26, situated in Chambers County, State of Alabama, containing 80 acres more or less.

Sixth. I give and bequeath to my son John Stokely Towles, the West 1/2 of the East 1/2 of the West 1/2
of Section 11, Township 22, Range 26, situated in Chambers County, Alabama, containing 80 acres more or less.

Seventh. I give and bequeath to my son Oliver Darden Towles, the West 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of Section 17, Township 23, Range 24, also Fraction (C.) on Section 20, same township and range, all lying and being situated in the County of Tallapoosa, in the State of Alabama, supposed to contain 120 acres.

Eighth. I give and bequeath to my daughters Elizabeth Frances Diamond, and Catharine Jane Wilkinson,
the SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 0f Section 18, Township 23, Range 24, also the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 20, Township 23, Range 24, all of said lands lying and being situated in the County of Tallapoosa and State of Alabama. Also, all my interest in certain gold lots in and around Goldville, Tallapoosa County, Alabama, held and owned jointly by the heirs at law of the late Britton Stamps of Butler County, Alabama, deceased (*Numbers and amount not known) and myself. I also further give and bequeath unto my said daughter Elizabeth Frances Diamond and Catharine Jane Wilkinson, my 1/4 interest, in and to a certain gold lot in the county of Harris and in the State of Georgia, known and distinguished as lot No. 312, in the 20th District and 3rd Section, containing 40 acres.

*Note, The Will of the late Britton Stamps, deceased, sets forth the numbers and amount of acres of land.

Ninth. I give and bequeath unto my youngest son James G. Towles, one black mare mule called Gin, one cow and calf, one feather bed and furniture, one bedstead and mattress, one sow and pigs, one set plow gear, one axe, one plow stock, single tree and clevis, and one four horse waggon, also 3 acres of land out of the NW corner of Section 14, Township 22, Range 26.

Tenth. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Susan Emily Towles, my saddle pony Tom Thumb, one cow and calf, one feather bed and mattress, bedstead and furniture, one bureau, and one piano forte.

Eleventh. I give and bequeath unto my daughter Louisa Ann Grimmett, one set silver castor and silver
spoons-large and small, (9 teaspoons and 5 large ones) marked with the letters L.A.T.

Twelfth. I give and bequeath to my son John Stokely Towles, my gold watch and fob chain (a gift from my Father)which I hope he will prize as a token of a Father's love, and not to be parted with or allowed to depart out
of the family, or be used as an article of merchandise, to raise money upon, to gratify some speculation fancy or otherwise.

Thirteenth. I give and bequeath all the rest and residue of my personal estate whatsoever and wheresoever of what nature, kind, and quality soever, the same may be and not herein given and disposed of (after payment of all my just debts, and funeral expenses) to my good and beloved wife Catharine W. Towles; And I do hereby constitute and appoint my said wife Catharine W. Towles, sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament, without being required to enter into bond as such Executrix, for the faithful execution of said trust.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, the fifteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand-eight hundred and seventy six (August 15, 1876).

John C. Towles L.S.

The above and forgoing instrument of six pages, was at the date thereof declared to us by the Testator John C. Towles, to be his last Will and Testament; and he then acknowledged to each of us, that he had subscribed the same, and we at his request, sign our names hereto as attesting witnesses.

F. A. Trammell
Jas. E. Scarbrough

The State of Alabama
Chambers County

I, Peter M. Rowland, Judge of Probate Court, in and for said county, do hereby certify that the foregoing
instrument of writing was on the 26th day of March, 1877, in said Court and before me, as the Judge, thereof duly proven by the proper testimony, to be the genuine last Will and Testament of John C. Towles, deceased, and that said Will together with said proof thereof, has been this day recorded in my office in Book 3 of Wills, pages 445, 446, 447 & 448. Given under my hand this July 11, 1877.

Peter M. Rowland
Judge of Probate
 
Towles, John C (I4331)
 
2174 WILL OF LAURENS FEAGLE

Newbery District

In the name of God, I Laurens Feagle of the district and state appeared to make and ordained this my last will and testament. To wit I will my body have suitable and Christian burial after my decease give unto my son George Feagle the whole of my real-estate now in my possession consisting of 390 acres to him and his legal descendants forever subject never the less to this provision that if my wife Rachael should out live me, she is to have possession of my dwelling house, and 2 as much land as she may need for cultivation and support. I also give unto my son George one negro boy Aaron, to him and his descendants forever. I give unto my beloved wife Rachael the following property Niv, one Negro man and one Negro woman and Billy Wagon and two horses and two cows and calves, four head of dry cattle, 16 head of hogs, all such farming utensils as she may need. As much of the household and kitchen furniture as she may select for her own use, to have and hold during her life and at, her death to be sold by my executor here-in after appointed and divided as I direct in a future provisions of my last will and testament.


I will that all my property of every kind whatsoever not enumerated and willed by the above bequest. To my son George and my wife, be sold after my death. The proceeds of which I hereby give to the children of my deceased daughter Mary Monts, of my deceased daughter, Sally Able. To Eve Koon, wife of Martin Koon, and Elizabeth Haltiwanger, wife of Jacob Haltiwanger, share and share alike, to them and their legal distributes forever.

I hereby direct that the property above devoted to my wife after her death be sold and divided among my above mentioned distributes (except Elizabeth Haltiwanger) my son John, William and George Feagle to them and their legal distributes share and share alike.


I hereby contribute to my son George Feagle my executor of this my last wi II and testament.


In testimony whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal, this Twenty second day of December. in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred fort one and in the Sixty sixth year of the of independence of the United States of America.


Signed Sealed acknowledged Laurens Feagle and executed in the presence of Joseph Currie John Werts Jr.  
Feagle, Laurens (I5598)
 
2175 WILL OF LORD MAYOR RALPH VERNEY

In the name of God, amen. The xj. day of Juyn, the yere of our Lord Mivlxxviij. and the xviij. yere of the reigne of king Edward the iiijth, I Rauf Verney, knyght, citezein mercer and alderman of the citee of London, though I be visited with sykenesse, neuerthelesse beyng of hole mynde and in goode memorie, laude and thankying be unto Almyghty God, make and ordeigne this my present testament in maner and forme as folowith.

First, I bequeth and recommende my soule vnto Allmyghty God in trinite, fardir and sone and holy gost, to the moost glorious virgyn our lady saint Marie, moder to the ijdc person in trinite, our blissed Lord Crist Jesu my redemer and saviour, to the hooly confessour saint Martyn the bisshop, and to all the hooly college of seyntes in heven; And my body to be buried in the church of saint Martyn Pomerey in Irmongerlane of London, that is to wite, in the toumbe standing vnder the sepulcre betwene the quere and our Lady Chapelle of the same churche. And after my body be buried, thanne I wolle, that, first and formest and before all other thyngs, after the funerale costes and expenses be doone for me at my buriyng and at my monethes mynde, that my dettes and dieutees, the which I owe to eny persone or persones of right or of conscience, be wele and trieuly paide or sette in a sure way so to be paied. And after that doone, thanne I wolle, that alle my goodes, cattals, and detts, what so euer they be, be euenly deuyded by myne executors by thaduyse of their ouerseers, and departed into iij. egalle partes, wherof I bequethe oone egall part vnto Emme my wife, she to haue it for hir part to her bilongyng of my goodes, catals, and dettes after the custume of the citee of London ; And for asmoch as my doughters dame Margarete Raleghe and Beatrice Danvers haue had their preferrement at their manages of their porcions to theme belongyng of my goodes, and my sonnes John Verney and Rauf Verney have not hadde their suche preferrement, therfor I bequethe to the same John and Rauf the ijde egallpart of my said goodes, catallis, and detts, to be diuided evenly bytwene theim ; savyng of the same ijde egall part, I wolle, that my said ij. doughters dame Margarete and Beatrice haue to theire owne vses of my plate of siluere beyng in the same ijdc egalle part, after the common valuyng of plate in London, that is to wite, the said dame Margarete to haue the value of xl. marcs, and the saide Beatrice to haue the value of xx/i.; And of the same ijde egalle part I wolle, also, that their be saued and reserued to the iij. doughters of the said Beatrice my doughter the value of xx/t. And the iijde egall part of my said goodes, catals, and detts I reserue to myne executours here vnderwritene, they to performe and fulfille therwith my legaces here vnderwritene and other charges to be doone for me, that is to wite: Firste, I biquethe to the highe aulter of the parisshe chirche of saint Martyn Pomerey aforsaid for my tithes or oblacions witheholdene forgotene, in discharge of my soule, and for my said sepulture to be hadde in the said place of the said churche, v. marcs. Item, I biquethe to the re- paracione of the body of the same churche of saint Martyn, and for things necessarie to be prouyded for the same churche, xUi. Item, I biquethe c. marcs therof to fynde an honest and convenable preest to syng for my soule, and the soules of my fadir and modir, my brothrene, my sustren, my children, and the soules of my speciall frendes Thomas Fauconere, Philipe Fau- conere, and John Hertwelle, and for all cristene soules, in the said chirch of saint Martyn Pomerey, by the space of x. yeres next suyng after my decesse. Item, I biquethe to the oolde werks of the cathedrall chirche of saint Paule of London xxs. Item, I biqueth to every hone of ye v. orders of Freres in the citee of London and in Flete strete, that is to wite, the Freres prechours Carmes Menours Augustines and Crouched freres, to pray specially for my soule, xxs. Item, I biquethe to the hous of freres at Ailesbury, in the countie of Bucks, they to haue my soule and the other soules aforsaid specially recommended to Almyghty God in their deuoute praiers, lxvjs. viijrf. Item, I biqueth to the maister and brethren of the hous of saint Thomas Acres in London, they to syng placebo dirige and masse of requiem by note for me in their owne chirche, xls. Item, I bi quethe to be distributed among the poure people of the parisshe of saint Martyn Pomerey aforsaide at diuerse tymes, as [to] my ne executours here vndre writene shall seme expedient and nedefull to be doone by their discrecions, xli. Item, I biqueth to euery hous of Lazers aboute the citee of London, xs.

Item, I biqueth xls. to be bestowed and distributed after my decesse in holsom metes and drinkes conuenient for pouere prisoners, and to be distributed among the pouer and nedy prisoners in the prison of Newgate of London, at diuerse tymes after the discrecions of myne executours. Item, I biqueth xls. to be bestowed and distributed under like forme among the pouer and nedy prisoners in the prison of Ludgate of London. Item, I bi queth xli. to be bistowed and distributed vnder like forme among the pouer and nedy prisoners in the Kynges Benche of Southewerk. Item, I biquethe xxs. to be bestowed and distributed among the pouer and nedy prisoners in the prison of the Marshalsye in Southwerk. Item, I biquethe xxs. to be be stowed and distributed vnder like forme among the pouer and nedy prisoners in the prisone of the Flete beside Fletestrete. Item, I biqueth xxs. to be bestowed and distributed vnder like forme among the pouere and nedy pri soners in the convict prison of thabbat of Westminster. Item, I biqueth xxs. to be bestowed and distributed amonge the pouere and nedy prisoners in the Comptour of the Pultrey, and other xxs. for like prisoners in the Comptour of Brethestrete of London.

Item, I biqueath to the priour and couent of Chatrehous beside Shene in the countee of Surrey, to pray specialy for my soule and the soules aforsaid, cs. Item, I biquethe to the priour and couent of the Chatrehous beside Londone, to pray specialy for my soule and the soules aforsaid, xls. Item, [I] biquethe to the reparacion of the chirche of Flete Merstone, in the countee of Bucks, and for ornamentes, thinges, and necessaries to be pro- uyded for the same chirch, cs. Item, I biquethe to be distributed among the pouere people of the same toune, and to the amendyng of the highe weyes of the same town, x. marcs. Item, I biquethe to the hous of the Freres Menours in the town of Northampton, for to haue a frere of the same hous to say his diuine seruice and masse in their chirche there, and to pray for my soule and the soules of myne aunte dame Alice Reynes, and of her husband John Cristemasse, and of all my goode-doers, for a certayne seasone conuenable after the discrecione of myne executours, x. marcs. Item, I biquethe to thamending and repairing of foule and ruynous weies which can be thought by the discretions of myne executours to be moost noyous about the citee of London, xxli. Item, I biquethe to the reparacione and amendyng of noyous and ruynous weyes nere aboute Aylesbury and Flete Merston, to be doone by the discrecions of myne executours, xli. Item, I biquethe to the comone box of my felishipe of the mercerye of Londone, toward the charges of the same felawshipe, xx. marcs. Item, I biquethe to my cousyne Johanne Raleghe, the doughtere of sir Edward Raleghe knyghte, and of my doughter dame Margarete his wife, to hir mariage, c. marcs. Item, I biquethe to John Pykyng, my wives sone, c. marcs, that is to wite, 1. marcs therof to be in full recompense and playne satisfaccion of alle his part to hyme belongyng of the houshold whiche was of his faders, and the othere 1. marcs I biquethe vnto hyme for the goode wille, love, and fauour the which I bere towardes hym for my said wife his modir sake, And if the said Johne wille refuse to haue and take the said 1. marcs, parcell of the said c. marcs, as in fulle recompense and playne satisfaccion of his said part of his saide fadres houshold, thanne I woll that my said biquest to hyme maade of c. marcs be voide and of noone effect ; And thanne I wolle that the same John haue of my goods no more thene the lawe wulle geve hyme.

Item, I biquethe to John Peper, my seruaunt, xli. Item, I biqueth to Elizabethe Botelere, my seruaunt, xxs. Item, I biqueth to Alice Wetherhede, my long-continued seruaunt, xb. Item, I biquethe to Anneys Coxtone xxvj*. viijrf. Item, I biquethe to Johann Lapwynk, my seruaunt, xxs. Item, I biquethe to . . . Raleghe, brother to the said Sir Edward Raleghe knyght, c.s. Item, I biquethe to Richard Hertwell, my seruaunt, cs. Item, I biquethe to Robert Pynchebek, my wifes cosyne, cs. Item, I biquethe to William Rede, my seruaunt, xh. Item, I biquethe to William Edy, my seruaunt of long time, liijs. iiijrf. Item, I biquethe to Marmaduke, my seruaunt, xh. Item, I biqueth to Seth Athercliff, my seruaunt, xh. Item, I biquethe to John Siluester, my seruaunt, xxs. Item, I biquethe to John, my cooke, xxs. Item, I biquethe to Milis Cook, xs. Item, I biquethe to John White, xs. Item, I biquethe to John Jakke, child of my kichen, xs. Item, I biquethe to John Burdigan, of my kychen, xs. Item, I biquethe to Richard Barton, my seruaunt, xs. Item, I biquethe to Thomas Goold, xxs. Item, I biquethe to Robert Brouderere, late my seruaunt, xx*. Item, I biquethe to my trewe louer John Brown, alderman of London, he to be oone of the overseers of this my present testament and to haue a remembraunce vpone my soule, oone of my cuppes couered of siluere gilt. Item, I biquethe to myne othere trewe louere Thomas Beleter, mercere of London, vnder semblable forme, oone othere of my cuppes couered of siluer gilt.

And the residue of the said iijde egalle part reserued to my said executours vnder the forme aforsaid, ouer my said legaces therof perfourmed, and ouer alle other charges borne and doone for me or for my cause that owene so to be borne and doone, I wol and biquethe to be disposed by myne exe- cutours for my soule, and for alle cristene soules, in goode dedes and werks of charite and pitee, suche as they by their discrecions hoope best to please God withalle, and moost to profite vnto the helthe of my soule. And of this my present testament I make and ordeyne myne executours Emme my welbeloued wife, Johne Verney, Rauf Verney, my sones, and Henre Danvers, mercere of Londone, requiring and chargyng alle my said executours that noone of them of presumpcion or of singulere wille take vpon hyme to do or execute eny part of this present testament or eny other thing concern yng the execucione of the same without the wille and hole assent of them alle, for my full wille is that they alle of oone wille and of oone assent and aggrement shulle werke and doo alle maner things concernyng this my pre sent testament and thexecucione of the same in alle degrees as they hope best to please God for the helthe of my soule. And their ouerseers I make and ordeyne my said trieu louers Johne Broune, alderman, and Thomas Beletere, mercers of Londone. And alle other testamentes maade of my moueable goodes, catals, and detts afore the day and yere aboue rehersed, I vtterly reuoke, adnulle, and wille to be cancelled and voide, and noone othere but oonly this to stand in any strengthe or effect, thanne there beyng present maister Richard Rede parson of Saint Martyn aforeseid, sir William Barbour preest, and other.

Proved before the Archbishop of Canterbury at Lambeth 25th June, 1478, by Emme the widow and John Verney and Ralph Verney the sons.  
Verney, Sir Ralph I Lord Mayor of London, MP (I13032)
 
2176 Will of Margaret Tate

In the name of God, Amen.

I, Margaret Tate, of the county of Baldwin and State of Alabama being sound in mind but not in body and feeling the uncertainty of life do hereby revoking all others make this my last will and testament.

Imprimis.

I commend my soul to God trusting in the merits of my savior for my salvation in the world to come.

2nd

I commend my body to christian burial.

3rd

To the heirs of my beloved daughter MARY D. SAUNDERS, I give and bequeath one negro man Sam, one negro woman Maria, one negro girl Amy, one negro boy Sam, one negro boy Daniel, one negro girl Perry, one negro boy Harry and all my swamp cattle to her heirs forever and it is hereby understood and intended that the aforesaid MARY D. SAUNDERS shall have the right and privilege of rising and enjoying all the immunities appurtenances, advantages and privileges which are and may arise from said property so long as she may live.

4th

To my beloved daughter MARGARET STAPLES and her heirs, I give and bequeath one negro man named Job, one negro girl named Silva, and child, and it is hereby understood that the aforesaid Margaret Staples is to take the above named negroes at a fair value to satisfy a note that Mr. JASON STAPLES holds against me, after the note is satisfied the balance is to go as part of her share of my estate. I also give and bequeath one negro woman named Betsy and her child named Jonab, one negro boy named Sandy, one negro boy named Twine, one negro boy named Tobe, one negro girl named Malissa, and her two children, one negro man named Ned, one negro boy named Harry, one negro girl named Patience to her and her heirs forever.

5th

To the children of my beloved son WILLIAM T. POWELL, I give and bequeath one negro man named William one negro man named Aaron, one negro man named Cuff, one negro boy named Stephen, one negro woman Elonisa, and her four children Siky, Daphney, Chloe and Tab, one negro woman named Pop~ My plantation situated and described as follows: The South East fraction quarter of section nineteen, in Township four of range three east containing one Hundred & fifty acres and sixty five hundredths of an acre. The west half of the northwest quarter of section nineteen, in township four range three east, containing eighty acres. The east subdivision of the west fraction of the north half, west of the Alabama River of section nineteen in Township four of range three east containing one hundred and fifty two acres one wagon, one ox cart and four oxen, all of my Hogs, all the farming utensils, five of my best mules. Eighty acres of pine land situated and described as follows: Township four range three east the north east quarter of the south west quarter of section thirty four, four large steers suitable for Oxen, all of the corn & fodder now on my Plantation, and it is hereby understood and intended that the aforesaid WILLIAM T. POWELL shall have the right and privilege of using and enjoying all the immunities appurtenances, advantages and privileges which are and may arise from said property so long as he may live but he the said WILLIAM T. POWELL shall not sell, give, grant or convey or dispose of any of said property under any pretence whatever.

6th

To my beloved daughter JOSEPHINE B. DREISBACK and her heirs. I give and bequeath one negro man named Dick, one negro woman Bella, and her four children named Pheobe, Hardy, Dick and Mary, one negro girl named Rose, one negro woman named Amy and her three children named Tina, Milly, and Fanny, one negro woman named Flora, one old negro man named Jonah, it is my wish the old man named Jonah shall do no hard work. I wish my daughter Josephine to have my watch and all of my household furniture, my Carriage and old Horse to her and her heirs forever.

7th

To my beloved Grand daughter MARY STAPLES, I give and bequeath, one negro woman named Clander and three of her children named Alex, Philip and Dilsy to her and her heirs forever.

8th

To my beloved Grand daughter JOSEPHINE STAPLES I give and bequeath one negro boy named Or to her and her heirs forever.

9th

To my beloved Grand Son ROBERT POWELL, I give and bequeath one Roan Mare to him and his heirs forever.

10th

It is my request that Hardy and his wife, Pheobe shall be set at liberty. I do not wish them to be slaves after my death. I wish them moved over to the place I purchased from THOMAS SAUNDERS. I do not wish that place sold under any consideration whatever. I wish him to have four cows and calves, and the two steers he is breaking for oxen at this time. I wish my son or Mr. Dreisback to act as his agent during life.

11th

And it hereby understood and intended that my daughter MARY D. SAUNDERS, have the right and privileges of using and cultivating one hundred acres of my plantation land which I have given to my son WILLIAM T. POWELL, the land which I wish her to have to right of using and cultivating lays above the Gin House, after the death of the said MARY D. SAUNDERS, the land shall revert to the children of my son WILLIAM T. POWELL.

12th

And I also give and bequeath to the said MARY D. SAUNDERS thirty head of sheep.

13th

I request that my stock of cattle one wagon and what mules may be left after my son gets his number out to be sold to the highest bidder the proceeds of which I wish applied to the payments of my debts any amount that may be left from the above sale after my debts are paid I wish it to be given to Mrs. ROSAHAH SHOMO.

14th

I do hereby appoint my son in law J. D. DREISBACK my executor and administrator to settle up my estate.

15th

It is my wish that my old negro woman Siky shall remain with my daughter Josephine during her life.

In testimony whereof I this day set my hand and seal this the twenty eighth day of Nov in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and fifty.

Margaret Tate

Witnesses

J. W. SHOMO

J. D. WEATHERFORD

State of Alabama}
Baldwin County}

Personally appeared before me PATRICK BYRNE, Judge of the Probate Court of Baldwin County & State aforesaid J. D. WEATHERFORD one of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing Instrument of writing and states on oath that he was requested to sign and was present at the signing of the Instrument of writing by J. W. SHOMO a subscribing witness and that Margaret Tate acknowledged the same to be her last Will and Testament and that the said Margaret Tate was in sound mind & memory

Subscribed & sworn to before me this 27th day of March A. D. 1851

Patrick Byrne
Judge Probate

Admitted to Probate 27th March A. D. 1851

Patrick Byrne
Judge
 
Dyer, Margaret (I5203)
 
2177 Will of Matthew TURNER of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: TURNER, ROGERS, DICKINSON, LOEW, BRITT

Will of MATTHEW TURNER, son of JOSEPH TURNER, written 31 May 1801, now present in the unbound Wayne Co., NC, Wills 1780 to 1905 in Raleigh, bestowed his property on: MATTHEW TURNER, nephew and son of BENJAMIN TURNER dec'd (1795), principal legatee; PRISCILLA, ELIZABETH and SARA DICKINSON, daughters of ISAAC DICKINSON (d. 1787 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMIN DICKINSON, son of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMINE ROGARS JUNER, son of SARA ROGARS, the sister of MATTHEW: negro named Phemby; NATHAN TURNER, nephew and son of brother BENJAMIN; SARA ROGERS TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN; ELIZABETH TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN. [Note: NATHAN, SARA ROGERS, and ELIZABETH TURNER are mentioned in the will of BENJAMIN TURNER (d. 1795 in Southampton Co., VA)]; MARY LOEW, sister (first married to JOEL DICKINSON (d. 1793); MARTHA DICKINSON, sister, wife of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801); CATHERINE BRITT, sister; Heirs of SARA ROGERS, dec'd sister. 
Dickinson, Isaac (I0321)
 
2178 Will of Matthew TURNER of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: TURNER, ROGERS, DICKINSON, LOEW, BRITT

Will of MATTHEW TURNER, son of JOSEPH TURNER, written 31 May 1801, now present in the unbound Wayne Co., NC, Wills 1780 to 1905 in Raleigh, bestowed his property on: MATTHEW TURNER, nephew and son of BENJAMIN TURNER dec'd (1795), principal legatee; PRISCILLA, ELIZABETH and SARA DICKINSON, daughters of ISAAC DICKINSON (d. 1787 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMIN DICKINSON, son of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMINE ROGARS JUNER, son of SARA ROGARS, the sister of MATTHEW: negro named Phemby; NATHAN TURNER, nephew and son of brother BENJAMIN; SARA ROGERS TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN; ELIZABETH TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN. [Note: NATHAN, SARA ROGERS, and ELIZABETH TURNER are mentioned in the will of BENJAMIN TURNER (d. 1795 in Southampton Co., VA)]; MARY LOEW, sister (first married to JOEL DICKINSON (d. 1793); MARTHA DICKINSON, sister, wife of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801); CATHERINE BRITT, sister; Heirs of SARA ROGERS, dec'd sister. 
Dickinson, Sarah (I0436)
 
2179 Will of Matthew TURNER of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: TURNER, ROGERS, DICKINSON, LOEW, BRITT

Will of MATTHEW TURNER, son of JOSEPH TURNER, written 31 May 1801, now present in the unbound Wayne Co., NC, Wills 1780 to 1905 in Raleigh, bestowed his property on: MATTHEW TURNER, nephew and son of BENJAMIN TURNER dec'd (1795), principal legatee; PRISCILLA, ELIZABETH and SARA DICKINSON, daughters of ISAAC DICKINSON (d. 1787 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMIN DICKINSON, son of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMINE ROGARS JUNER, son of SARA ROGARS, the sister of MATTHEW: negro named Phemby; NATHAN TURNER, nephew and son of brother BENJAMIN; SARA ROGERS TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN; ELIZABETH TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN. [Note: NATHAN, SARA ROGERS, and ELIZABETH TURNER are mentioned in the will of BENJAMIN TURNER (d. 1795 in Southampton Co., VA)]; MARY LOEW, sister (first married to JOEL DICKINSON (d. 1793); MARTHA DICKINSON, sister, wife of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801); CATHERINE BRITT, sister; Heirs of SARA ROGERS, dec'd sister. 
Dickinson, Elizabeth (I0437)
 
2180 Will of Matthew TURNER of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: TURNER, ROGERS, DICKINSON, LOEW, BRITT

Will of MATTHEW TURNER, son of JOSEPH TURNER, written 31 May 1801, now present in the unbound Wayne Co., NC, Wills 1780 to 1905 in Raleigh, bestowed his property on: MATTHEW TURNER, nephew and son of BENJAMIN TURNER dec'd (1795), principal legatee; PRISCILLA, ELIZABETH and SARA DICKINSON, daughters of ISAAC DICKINSON (d. 1787 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMIN DICKINSON, son of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMINE ROGARS JUNER, son of SARA ROGARS, the sister of MATTHEW: negro named Phemby; NATHAN TURNER, nephew and son of brother BENJAMIN; SARA ROGERS TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN; ELIZABETH TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN. [Note: NATHAN, SARA ROGERS, and ELIZABETH TURNER are mentioned in the will of BENJAMIN TURNER (d. 1795 in Southampton Co., VA)]; MARY LOEW, sister (first married to JOEL DICKINSON (d. 1793); MARTHA DICKINSON, sister, wife of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801); CATHERINE BRITT, sister; Heirs of SARA ROGERS, dec'd sister. 
Dickinson, Priscilla (I0438)
 
2181 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I0439)
 
2182 Will of Matthew TURNER of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: TURNER, ROGERS, DICKINSON, LOEW, BRITT

Will of MATTHEW TURNER, son of JOSEPH TURNER, written 31 May 1801, now present in the unbound Wayne Co., NC, Wills 1780 to 1905 in Raleigh, bestowed his property on: MATTHEW TURNER, nephew and son of BENJAMIN TURNER dec'd (1795), principal legatee; PRISCILLA, ELIZABETH and SARA DICKINSON, daughters of ISAAC DICKINSON (d. 1787 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMIN DICKINSON, son of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801 in Wayne Co., NC); BENJAMINE ROGARS JUNER, son of SARA ROGARS, the sister of MATTHEW: negro named Phemby; NATHAN TURNER, nephew and son of brother BENJAMIN; SARA ROGERS TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN; ELIZABETH TURNER, niece and daughter of BENJAMIN. [Note: NATHAN, SARA ROGERS, and ELIZABETH TURNER are mentioned in the will of BENJAMIN TURNER (d. 1795 in Southampton Co., VA)]; MARY LOEW, sister (first married to JOEL DICKINSON (d. 1793); MARTHA DICKINSON, sister, wife of DANIEL DICKINSON (d. 1801); CATHERINE BRITT, sister; Heirs of SARA ROGERS, dec'd sister. 
Dickinson, Daniel (I0441)
 
2183 WILL OF WARREN STONE
Lowndes County, Alabama
Will Book B, pages 219 - 222


In the name of God Amen:

I, Warren Stone, of the County of Lowndes, Alabama, being of sound mind and disposing memory, blessed be God, but calling to mind the uncertainty of life, and the certainty of death, do make, ordain, publish and declare this my last Will and Testament, (revoking all other heretofore made) in manner following, that is to say.

Item first, I give and bequeath to my wife Silvey, the land on which I now live, for and during her life, known as the North East quarter of section thirty five in Township Sixteen, Range fifteen, in said county and a part of the East of the south east quarter of the same section, to be divided by a line commencing on the North side and to run as the laine formerly ran past the Gin house to the first cross fence, thence westwardly along the cross fence, to the west line, and she to have all east and south of these lines thus to be run. I also give her, for her life, the slaves, Negro man named Bradley, a boy Bill, and boy William, woman Edy, girl called little Amy, one Wagon and Gear, one Barouche and Harness, and three choice horses, One Bed, bedstead, bed clothes belonging to the bed, and two counterpins, four cows and Calves, ten choice Hogs, three choice sows and Pigs, six sheep, one Press, one Desk of Drawers, two large looking Glasses, one small one, one clock, all the crockery and Glass ware on hand, six ploughs left to her choice, the Kitchen furniture, as much as she needs, one folding table, One plain table, one dozen choice chairs, one chest, two trunks, Geese, Ducks & Poultry, and a support of wheat, corn and fodder for one year, and one safe. The above named property to hold during her life only, and at her death, all the said slaves and other personal property, to be sold and the proceeds, to be equally divided among any heirs, per Stripes, and not per Capita.

I, also give to my said wife, absolutely and in fee, the property I received by her, vis: Negro Woman Hannah, two large beds and one small Bed and chest and table, two large bed steads, one small bedstead, bed clothes, and irons all common to as she pleases with.

2nd. I give and bequeath, that all the property which I have heretofore given to my children, shall be retained by them in the manner in which it was given, and shall not be brought into Hotch Pot, nor shall any account be taken thereof.

3rd. Whereas by deed bearing date the 22nd day of March A. D. 1848, I have given and conveyed to Barton W. Stone and Warren T. Stone certain negroes, in Trust, now herein this item named, to wit, in Trust, to give and deliver for their use and benefit. To the heirs of Mary M. Nicholson, Negro man Daniel, and Woman Agnis, to be equally divided between them. To Catherine J. Sherrill, woman Parilee, Girl Mahaley, Boy Amos, and youngest child Loyd. To Kiziah J. Meriwether man Albert and his wife Ellen and child Milley. To Absolum B. Stone, Negro man Eli, and Woman Linda. To Robert W. Russell and John Russell, sons of Louisa M. Russell, negro boy Lewis, woman Hasty, and her three children, Nelson, Mary and General, to be equally divided among them. To John H. Stone, Negro man Ligo, and woman Minerva, and child Ingdy. To Elizabeth A. Frith, to have and to hold during her life, negro man Jim and his wife Peggy and boy John. At her death, to return, and to be divided among my lawful heirs, per Stripes. To Barton W. Stone, to hold in Trust for Martha G. Hamilton, to her sale and separate use, during her life, free from the debts and control of her husband, Negro man Dick, woman Amy, and girl Clary. And after her death to be equally divided among her heirs. To Barton W. Stone to hold in fee, discharged of all trusts after my death, negro man George and his wife Rener, and man big George. And To Warren T. Stone, to hold in fee, discharged of all trusts, after my death, Negro man Jack and boy Jacob. Now I wish and direct, the property delivered and held and trusts executed, according to the terms of the said deed and if any of the said slaves in this deed mentioned should die, or by reason of sickness, disease or casualty should become of no value, or be very greatly reduced in value during my life, then I direct that the same to be made good to those whose use it is given, by said deed out of the part of my estate not specifically bequeathed.

Item 4th. I give and bequeath to my son Warren T. Stone the West part of the south east quarter of section thirty five, Township sixteen, Range fifteen for the line designated in the first item. And after the death of my said wife, I give him the land mentioned as given to my wife, during her life, that is subject to the bequest before given to my wife, I give to him Warren T. Stone, the North east quarter and southeast quarter of Section thirty five, Township sixteen, Range fifteen.

Item 5th. I will and direct my Executors to sell my tract of land known as the Miles tract, containing two and a half quarters, and the proceeds to be divided into eight equal parts, and one part given to Catherine J. Sherrill and Kiziah J. Meriwether. One to Barton W. Stone, one to Absolum B. Stone, one to John H. Stone, one to Warren T. Stone, one to the heirs of Mary M. Nicholson and one to the heirs of Louisa M. Russell, to be equally divided.

Item 6th. All the property, now given, or heretofore given to, or for Martha G. Hamilton, is to her sale and separate use, during her life, and after her death, to the heirs of her body, not to be liable for debts of her husband, and to be equally divided among such heirs, and in the same manner, I have given a tract of land in Coosa County, known as the Deshazer tract to Barton W. Stone in trust, for said Martha G. To her separate use for life, remainder to the heirs of her body, which land I wish her to have and hold accordingly.

Item 7th. I will and direct, that all of the property and money and assets of which I may die possessed, or entitled to or which belong to me, not herein before bequeathed as intended so to be, consisting of slaves, horses, cattle, produce, utensils, furniture, and all personal property to be sold after the crop may then be growing, shall have been gathered and secured, and out of the proceeds to pay my said wife, one hundred dollars and Catherine J. Sherrill, one hundred dollars, and the residue after paying all my debts, and all expenses, shall be divided into ten equal parts, of which one part shall go to the heirs of each of my children who have died before me, except for the share, which may be allotted to the heirs of Louisa M. Russell, Robert W. And John H. Russell, one hundred and fifty dollars shall be deducted, and paid over to Absolum B. Stone, to increase his share.

Item 8th. Should any of my children, or Grand children mentioned above as legatees die before me, the legacy given to such, shall not lapse, but shall go and be divided among the heirs of such child, or Grand child.

Item 9th. Whenever the word increase is this Will occurs has been erased. Lastly I constitute and appoint Barton W. Stone, Absolum B. Stone, and Warren T. Stone, my lawful Executors, to carry into effect, this my last Will and testament.

In witness, Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty second of March in the year A.D. One Thousand eight hundred and forty eight.

Signed sealed and delivered.

Warren Stone

In the presence of
Witness: P. T. Graves, Josiah Haigler, James T. Andrew.
 
Stone, Warren Henley (I5318)
 
2184 WILL OF WILLIAM M. BLANTON

GEORGIA, SPALDING COUNTY

In the name of God, Amen. I William M. Blanton of the County of Coweta, State of Georgia, being of sound and disposing mind and memory do make and declare this my Last Will and Testament.

ITEM 1st. I give and bequeath to my son W. P. Blanton of Spalding County, Georgia, sixty acres of land in Coweta County, Georgia, the same being the land on which I now reside, being the land purchased by me from David Gable on the eighth of December 1885, and recorded in the Superior Court of Coweta County, Georgia, January 16th, 1886, provided said W. P. Blanton shall pay into my estate the sum of Seven Hundred Dollars the purchase price paid by me for said land which sum of Seven Hundred Dollars, when so paid into the hands of my executors to be hereinafter named shall be and become a part of my estate to be divided and administered as hereinafter provided in this my Last Will and Testament, as part of my estate. The title to said sixty acres, on the payment by said W. P. Blanton of said Seven Hundred Dollars into my estate to vest, absolutely in fee simple in him the said W. P. Blanton.

ITEM 2nd. I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Ellis, wife of James R. Ellis and her two daughters Bessie Hall and Mary Louise Ellis for their sole and separate use free from any debts, liabilities, use or control of James R. Ellis the sum of Two Hundred Dollars said sum to be divided among them equally, share and share alike.

ITEM 3rd. It is my will and I so declare that the balance of my estate after paying the special bequests mentioned in ITEM 2nd of this will that is the Two Hundred dollars given to Mary Ellis and her two daughters, which balance includes the Seven Hundred Dollars to be paid into my estate by W. P. Blanton for the sixty acres of land mentioned in ITEM 1st of this my will shall be divided equally, share and share alike among the following children and grandchildren to wit: W. P. Blanton of Spalding County, L. P. Blanton of Spalding County, Julia Maddox of Spalding County, Mary Ellis of Spalding County, and to the children of Daniel Redding who married my daughter Clara Blanton, to the children of C. P. Daniel who married my daughter Annie Blanton and to the children of C. A. Dickerson who married Lucy Blanton, that is the children of the issue of that marriage between C. A. Dickerson and Lucy Blanton.

ITEM 4th. I hereby constitute and appoint as my executors of this my Last Will and Testament my sons W. P. & L. P. Blanton of Spalding County, Georgia and request that they do not be required to give any bond or make any returns of their acts and doings in the execution of this my Last Will and Testament and in the administration of my estate trusting to their honor and integrity and my confidence in them to do their duty.

Given under my hand and seal this June 13th, 1905.

William M. Blanton (L.S.)

Signed, sealed, published and declared at Griffin, Spalding County, Georgia, this the thirteenth day of June in the year of our Lord Nineteen hundred and five (1905) as the Last Will and Testament of William M. Blanton, who signed the same in our presence, as his Last Will; we signing the same at his request as witnesses, he signing in our presence and we each and all signing in the presence of each other and in his presence, this 13th day of June 1905 signed & sealed in our presence.

B. R. Blakely

J. P. Nichols

Walter C. Beeks

 
Blanton, William McKendree (I0240)
 
2185 WILL OF WILLIAM MCDOWELL

Recorded in Will Book "B", Page 198, Ordinary's Office, Monticello, Jasper County, Georgia

GEORGIA, JASPER COUNTY

In the name of God, Amen

I, William McDowell, of the County and State aforesaid, being weak in body from the infirmity of old age, but of sound and disposing mind, memory and discretion, do make this my last will and testament, in manner following, viz.-

Item 1st: I give to my beloved wife, MARY ANN MCDOWELL, a negro man by the name of Jack and a negro woman named Lucy, and an equal interest with my daughter, ELIZABETH BULLARD, in the following tract of land, to wit. in all that tract of land known by land lot No. 81 in the 14th District, originally Baldwin, now Jasper, containing 100 acres, and sixty acres of land, being part of lot No. 80 in said district, and to be laid off as to include the house I now live in, an on the northwest line from lot 79 to lot 81, and one bed and furniture.

Item 2: I give and bequest unto my son JAMES, a certain negro boy by the name of Ephraim, and four hundred dollars, in addition to what I have already given him.

Item 3: I give and bequeath unto my son, DANIEL, a certain negro boy named Daniel, and two hundred dollars, in addition to what he has already received.

Item 4: I give and bequeath unto my son, WILLIAM, one hundred and a quarter acres of land, it being one-half of lot No. 175 in the sixteenth district of originally Baldwin, now Jasper County, and eight negroes, viz. -- Abram and Betty, his wife, and five children named Ben, Stacy, Grigs, Rachel and Dice, and one other yellow girl by the name of Matilda, and one bed and furniture.

Item 5: I give and bequeath unto my son CHARLES, a certain negro boy by the name of Nelson, in addition to what I have before given him.

Item 6: I give to my daughter, ELIZABETH BULLARD, an equal interest in one hundred and sixty acres of land, which I have bequeathed to her mother, Mary Ann McDowell, and herself.

Item 7: I give and bequeath unto my son, CHARLES MCDOWELL, in trust for my daughter, NANCY MALPASS, and her issue, one negro woman named Judith, one negro boy named Washington, and one other negro boy named Mitchell and the proceeds of a negro woman named Mary, who I desire to be sold.

Item 8: I give and bequeath unto my daughter, ELEANOR JOINER, eighty acres of land, adjoining Benjamin Fudge's land, being part of Lot No. 80 and in the 14th district of originally Baldwin, now Jasper County, in addition to what she has already received.

Item 9: I give and bequeath to my daughter, MARY WORTHY, sixty acres of land, being part of Lot No. 80 in the 14th District of originally Baldwin, now Jasper County, and bounded Southeast by the part of said lot given to ELEANOR JOINER, and northwest by a part of said lot given to my wife, Mary Ann McDowell, and ELIZABETH BULLARD, in addition to what I have already given her.

Item 10: I give and bequeath to my daughter, JANE BAILEY, two negro children, to wit, Faith and Jordan and three hundred dollars, in addition to what I have before given her.

Item 11: I give and bequeath unto my daughter TEMPERANCE MCDOWELl, four negroes, namely, Bobb, a man, Alfred, a boy, and two women, Martha and little Mary and one bed and furniture.

Item 12th: I give and bequetah to my son THOMAS MCDOWELL, four negroes, wiz. - Isaac, a man, Joe, a boy, Tamas, a woman and Hannah, a girl and a bed and furniture.

Item 13th: I give and bequeath unto my daughter, MARTHA MCDOWELL, five negroes, to wit: Manuel, a man, Jarrett, a boy, Fanny, a woman and her two children, Peter and Frank, and one bed and furniture.

Item 14th: It is my will and wish that my executors shall the next year after my decease, make a crop on my plantation, or if they should think it to the interest of my estate, to hire my negroes out and rent my plantation for one year, I leave it to them to do whichever they think best, and if they think best to rent the plantation and hire out the negroes, then I wish my horses and perishable property to be sold, and the proceeds applied to the discharge of my debits, and then I wish all my land (perishable property, if not sold before), other than such as have been named in this my last will and testament, shall be sold and the proceeds applied to the discharge of my debts, and to paying off the legatees, the several sums annexed to their names, and should there be any surplus, after paying all just demands, I leave it to be equally divided should there be a deficit, each legatee is to pay a proportionable share there.

In confirmation of these present., I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, hereby revoking and annulling all former wills and testaments that I may have heretofore made touching my estate, this the 30th day of September, 1822.

WILLIAM MCDOWELL (SEAL)

Signed, sealed and delivered
in the presence of:

John S. Drew
Isiah Langley
Solomon Fudge

GEORGIE, JASPER COUNTY:

I William McDowell, do make this codicil to the above last will and testament, viz. - I leave my son, CHARLES MCDOWELL, guardian for my daughter, NANCY MALPASS, and her heirs, to govern and manage the property I have left her and the way I have directed. I also appoint my son, DANIEL MCDOWELL, and ISAAC BAILEY, executors of this my last will and testament.

Sealed and delivered this 30th day of September, 1822.

WILLIAM MCDOWELL

In the presence of:

John S. Drew
Isaiah Langley
Solomon Fudge

Court of Ordinary, 6th January, 1823, came into open court, John S. Drew, Isaiah Langley and Solomon Fudge, the subscribing witnesses to the within will, and being duly sworn, say that they saw William McDowell sign, seal, and publish and declare this instruments of writing to contain his last will and testament and at the said time he was of sound and disposing mind and memory.

Sworn to and subscribed in open court in the presence of:

John Drew
Isaiah Langley
Solomon Fudge

John C. Gibson, C.C.O.
Recorded 14th Feb. 1823

 
McDowell, William (I4347)
 
2186 Will of Young D. Allen Wills 1840-1876 Pike Co. Ga. State of Georgia, Pike County, In the name of God Amen this 18th day of March 1848. I Young D. Allen of the County and State aforesaid do constitute, ordain and make published and declare this writing to contain my last Will and Testament as follows.

Item 1 I leave to my wife, Jincey ALLEN, during her natural life and at her death to be equally divided among my three oldest children, to wit, Abraham S. ALLEN, Robert H. ALLEN and Elizabeth ALLEN now the wife of Thomas W. BALLARD, the following property to wit, Alexander, a negro man and Eliza his wife, Dilby a girl and Jim a man, Two lots of land, 223 and 224 in the first district of Pike County and half of my stock of hogs, cows, household and kitchen furniture and plantation tools, two horses or mules as she may choose, also provisions sufficient to last her and hands and stock one year.

Item 2 I give to my son Abraham S. ALLEN lot of land no. two hundred and twenty seven in the first district of Pike County, also a negro fellow by the nameof Jack and one named Mark.

Item 3 I give to my son Robert H. ALLEN the two following negroes to wit Charles and Peter, also the two following lots of land No. 225 and 226 in the first district of Pike County, one cow and calf, one sow and pigs and bed and furniture.

Item 4 I give to my daughter Elizabeth BALLARD my two negroes Amos and Booker.

Item 5 I give to my daughter NANCY all my inerest in a lot of land in Stewart County it being on seventh and on fourteenth part of lot No. 11 in the 18th Dist. of Lee when surveyed and the land I purchased of Mary Hester.

Item 6 The balance of my estate real and personal and every kind I may be possessed of at my death I wish sold and the proceeds after paying my just debts to be equally divided with my three oldest children, Abraham S. ALLEN , Elizabeth BALLARD and Robert ALLEN.

Item 7 I hereby appoint Abraham S.ALLEN, Robert H.ALLEN and Thomas W. BALLARD executors of this my last Will and Testament, signed, sealed, declared and published by Young D. ALLEN as his last Will and Testament in the presence of us the subscribers who subscribe our names hereto in the presence of said Testator at his instance and request and in the presence of each other this the 20th March 1848.

Wm W. Arnold
Thomas E. Hicks
Henry A. Caldwell

State of Georgia Pike County

We Henry A. Caldwell and Thomas E. Hicks do solomnly swear that we saw Young D. Allen sign, seal, publish and declare this writing to be and contain his will and at the time thereof he was of sound disposing mind and memory and that he did it feely without compulsion to the best of our knowledge and that we saw William W. Arnold sign the same as witness, this 4th September 1848.

Att’d in open court
W.O. Mangham C.C.D.
Henry A. Caldwell
Thomas E. Hicks

1  
Allen, Young Drewry (I2133)
 
2187 William Askew nominated as Executor. Askew, James M (I0033)
 
2188 William Brents, at one time a leading farmer and well known hotel keeper in Saline County, but at present retired, was born in what is now Marshall County, Tennessee, in the year 1811, and is a son of Thomas and Jane McWhurter Brents, natives of Kentucky, but who were very early settlers of Marshall (formerly Lincoln) County, Tennessee, where they spent the remainder of the lives. The father was a successful farmer and a prominent citizen of that county, and in religious belief was a member of the Christian Church. He served with distinction in the Revolutionary War, and was with Gen. Jackson at the battle of New Orleans. His father was John Brents, one of the early settlers of Kentucky, where his death occurred at an advanced age. The maternal grandfather, James McWhurter, was of Irish origin, and also fought in the War of 1812. William Brents, the principal of this sketch, and the fourth of four sons and four daughters born to his parents, was reared on his father's far. He was educated in the public schools of his birthplace and acquired a good English training, being instructed in the duties of farm life by his father. When twenty-one years of age he was married to Mahala, a daughter of Robert and Lucy Ewing, by whom he had ten children, of whom one son and three daughters are yet living: Harriet (widow of Frank Shoemaker), Malvina (wife of Thomas Delamer, residing in Texas), Robert E., and Siff (wife of Alfred Trammell, residing near El Dorado). Mr. Brents lost his first wife, and in January, 1868, was married to Mrs. Xalisco Dickenson, an estimable widow, and daughter of Robert Stribling. The lady was born in Georgia, but came to Arkansas with her parents when three years old, and settled in Hot Spring County, where her father and mother both died. One child was born to her marriage with Mr. Brents, Lily. Mr. Brents was one of the first settlers of Saline County, having come here in 1844, and he has made it his home ever since. The year following his arrival he purchased a farm near Benton, which he still owns, and has accumulated altogether about 550 acres of fertile land, with some 200 acres under cultivation, all of it being the result of his individual effort and good management. He is noted above all things for his enterprise, as is illustrated by the fact that on the second day of his arrival he opened up a hotel, which was afterward one of the most noted in Central Arkansas, continuing in that business until the war. After that event he turned his attention to farming with equal success until his retirement from active life. His industry and energy have won the respect and admiration of the entire community, and he can now rest content with the knowledge that he has done his share toward the development and improvement of Saline County. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, having cast his first presidential vote for Jackson in 1832, and for every presidential candidate since that time except during the war. Before that period he followed the trade of harness and saddle-maker in connection with his other interests.

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Central Arkansas Counties, (Chicago, Illinois: Goodspeed, 1889), 245.

 
Brents, William (I4854)
 
2189 William C. Wright. The lawyer of pre-eminent distinction in Newnan and the Coweta Circuit is William Carter Wright, a native of Georgia and a representative of one of the leading families of Northern Virginia and of this section of Georgia. In a family whose members have given it especial distinction, genealogical details are of genuine interest. Let us therefore note some of the leading facts in the lives of Attorney Wright's grandfather, James Wright, and his father, Benjamin Wright.

Both the grandfather and grandmother of our subject were natives of the Old Dominion State. James Wright and his wife moved from Northern Virginia, early in the nineteenth century, to Eastern Georgia, where they reared their family. He was a planter and slave-holder, a man of prominence in his section. A stanch democrat, he took an active interest in political affairs. His vigorous life closed in Putnam County, after seventyfive years of independent and forceful activity. His son Benjamin (who lived to become the father of William Carter Wright) was of Putnam County birth. There he was reared. He married Miss Emily Eubanks Tompkins, also a native of Putnam County. Soon after their lives and fortunes were united, they remdved to Carroll County, which was the scene of their long and eventful life together. Benjamin Wright becam e a man of purposive political activities. His strong individuality made him a noteworthy figure in the Georgia State Legislature, of which he was a member, both in Senate and House, representing the Carroll County district. He was, moreover, a member of the historical secession convention of Milledgeville, which severed the southern states from the Union. Vocationally, Benjamin Wright was a planter. He and his wife, Emily Wright, lived to an unusually ripe old age. Despite the service he had given to the Confederate army, Colonel Wright lived to number his years as eighty-three, one year less than those attained by Mrs. Wright, who died in 1914, at the age of eighty-four. Both were active members of the Baptist Church. They reared four sons and three daughters. Tompkins Wright, the eldest, was but sixteen years of age when he joined Captain Beall's companies of the Confederate army; while in service he contracted pneumonia, which soon cut short his promising young life. Mary C. Wright became Mrs. J. C. Gibson, of Newnan, Georgia. Giles B. Wright is a resident of Atlanta, Georgia. Nicholas T. Wright died in 1909, at Newnan, Georgia. Emma Wright and Ada K. Wright married brothers?the former lady becoming Mrs. E. S. Roberts and the latter Mrs. T. S. Roberts, both families establishing homes in Crisp, Ben Hill County, Georgia. The youngest member of the family is William Carter Wright, whose name forms the title of this biographical review.

A self-made, educated man is William C. Wright, whose fortunate combination of native gifts and consistent ambition have led him from point to point of his successful career. Carroll County was the scene of his nativity, the date of that event being January 6, 1866. Showing at an early age an interest in books and public affairs, as well as a talent for persuasive oratory, he continued his studies through the high school and soon after became a popular young schoolmaster in the educational institutions of Carroll County. Such work, pursued by a young person of character, soon develops individuality and initiative to a practical degree; those were the qualities which guided William Wright to the choice of the law as a life-work and those have been as well notable characteristics of its performance.

Mr. Wright's first tutor in legal lore was Gen. L. H. Featherstone, whose office our subject entered at Newnan, Georgia. When those studies were cut short by General Featherstone's death,'they were resumed under exGovernor William Y. Adkinson, of Newnan, Georgia. After this period of training was concluded, Mr. Wright was formally admitted to the practice of law in 1886.

Attorney Wright's first professional partnership was formed with the Hon. P. S. Willcoxon. After five years spent as junior partner of the firm, Mr.Wright entered another professional relation, becoming the head of the partnership of Wright and Farmer, his junior partner being L. W. Farmer of Newnan. Two years of legal practice in this connection were followed by another change. At that time our subject became associated with the Hon. R. W. Freeman and the firm thus formed was known for the eight years of its existence as the leading legal office of the City of Newnan. This association was not to be permanent, however, for Mr. Freeman was eventually called to the bench, as superior judge for Coweta Circuit. AttorneyWright has since continued to administer independently the legal business of the large class of clients acquired and his is conceded to be the most important practice of the community. Mr. Wright has in the interim been honored with the office of solicitor of City Court of Newman, Coweta County, holding that office for eight years and demonstrating his ability as one of the ablest prosecutors who have been known in the history of the county. With all his heavy professional business, he finds time for practical participation in affairs educational and matters agricultural. He has served for several years on the Newnau Board of Education, having a sincere and deep interest in this phase of civic life. Mr. Wright, like every true Southerner, has a genuine affection for "our mother, the earth," and takes delight in managing the business of his farm. He has a genius for getting results from the soil and holds the record of having raised forty bales of cotton with the use of but two plows.

The attractive and efficient mistress of Attorney Wright's home is Pauline Arnold Wright, to whom he was married September 15, 1892. Mrs.Wright is a daughter of William P. and Mary (Harris) Buford, well-known citizens of the community. Several children have come to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wright. Evelyn, the eldest, was born in 1893; Emily, the second, died at the age of four years and her little sister Pauline was called by "the reaper of the flowers" at the age of two years. Arnold, the first son, and William C. Wright, junior, are the other members of the family, and all were born in Newnan, Georgia.

Fraternal and religious life have their due share in the life of the Wright family. Mrs. W7right is a loyal and helpful member of the Methodist Church, to whose interests she devotes both time and talent; while her husband continues his allegiance to the Baptist division of the church, so faithfully adhered to by his ancestors. He is a popular Mason, having been honored by all chairs to that of Shrine. The Elks also claim his membership as a genial and distinguished member. A well-rounded life is William C. Wright's, one of fully deserved success, of broad interests, of admirable character, of substantial qualities well worthy of emulation. 
Wright, Hon. William Carter (I8112)
 
2190 William de Braose put his lordship on the block, eventually selling it to his son-in-law, John de Mowbray. Hugh Despenser had been in the offing for the prize, and the loss nettled. He predictably appealed to the king who predictably seized the lordship on 26 Oct 1320. This rankled with Mowbray no less than the other Marcher lords, who had seen other similar Despenser-inspired outrages. "In taking Gower into royal hands Edward was declaring that he would defend Despenser to the last, against all law, all reason and all arms. * * * England was once more plunging headlong towards civil war, on account of the king placing a personal friendship over and above the interests of the kingdom."  Mowbray, John I 2nd Baron Mowbray (I11398)
 
2191 William Harris (1633, England-5/16/1698) and Jane of Stafford Co.

He arrived around 1660 as a Lieutenant in the English army. He was granted patent on 4200 acres in Stafford County, now in Fairfax County (including the town of Colchester and land in Occoquan Regional Park, DC Dept of Corrections, Fort Belvoir, and Lorton, as well as Occoquan. In 1679 he was granted another 1600 acres at the head of Neabsco Creek. A 1681 letter indicates that he had been captured by the Indians and was held for ransom for over a year. In 1686 he bought three slaves, a ship, and livestock from his father-in-law, perhaps reestablishing his household after a calamity. In 1690 he was granted another patent of 1600 acres on Neabsco Creek. He bought a slave, Benjamin Lewis, who sued successfully for his freedom as having come to America under indenture. At his death he still had 2446 acres, divided by granddaughters. He was buried at Neabsco Creek under an unusual carved stone later moved to the Pohick Church. "Heare lyes bodey of Liut Willeame. Herris who died May 16: 1698: aged: 065 years: by birth a Britaine: A good soldier A good husband and Kinde neighbour. A bronze plaque notes that he was the father of Anne Harris, the wife of Thomas Owsley. ("Owsley Family Historical Society Newsletter, Dec. 1993).  
Harris, Lt. William (I1710)
 
2192 William is enumerated with the household of his brother, Dr. George McDowell. There is no indication that he ever married. McDowell, William Franklin (I0271)
 
2193 William is identified as the single, head-of-house. Sister Emma is enumerated as the sole, other household member. McDowell, William Franklin (I0271)
 
2194 William Middleton, born c1686 in Charles County, Maryland; died shortly before 15 Nov 1769 when his will of 15 May 1769 was proved in Charles County. From 1732 to 1741 and again in 1748 he represented Charles County in the General Assembly and from 1739 to 1747 served as a Justice of the Peace. He was married (1) c1712 to Elizabeth Tears, widow of John Keech, and daughter of Rev. Hugh and Ruth (Wynne, Wine) Tear. She was living 16 July 1748 but was deceased by 30 Aug 1758. By the latter date he was married (2) to Henrietta.



* * * *

William Middleton was called "William 2nd" (it was written in Maryland records when he was two years old in 16870. In that year, William Hutchinson, who was his godfather, gave to William 2nd Middleton a tract of land called "Godfather's Guift" near Anacostia River, called then the Eastern Branch of the Potomac and probably in sight of Washington. William sold it some years after his marriage about 1711-12 to Mrs. Elizabeth Keech, widow of John Keech. Elizabeth was the daughter of Rev. Hugh Teares and his wife, Ruth (Holland).

In 1699 Rev. Hugh Teares made his will. He left his "daughter, Elizabeth" in the care of her aunt, Mrs. Elizabeth Hawkins. Mrs. Hawkins about 1687-9 made a deed to 90 acres of land in Charles County, Maryland..."to my sister Ruth Teares, the wife of Hugh Teares...." Mrs. Hawkins named a son Henry Holland Hawkins and Elizabeth Teares Middleton, (also named a son "Holland" Middleton). His second wife, Henrietta was named by him as his executrix in his (William Middleton) will. Her surname has not learned. They were married between 1748 and 1758.

Designations:

In the deeds to which William Middleton was a party he was usually called "Gentleman," but occasionally other designations were used such as Planter, Merchant, Mr., and Esquire. On hundreds of records of the Charles County Court of the years 1739-1748 he is referred to as "one of His Lordship's Justices of the Peace for this County."

William Middleton was a member of the Lower House of Maryland Assembly, representing Charles County from 11 July 1732 through the session that started 26 May 1741. (Ref. Assembly Records, Archives of Maryland, Vol. 37:445; Vol. 39:55, 151, 220, & 438; Vol. 40:39, 122, 169, 280 & 518; and Vol. 42:83 & 192). Then after an interval of several years he was again elected to the Body and served, as shown by the following entry: "Mr. William Middleton, a member elected for Charles County in the Room of Mr. John Courts, deceased took the oaths etc 30 May 1748." He served as one of the Justices for Charles County for nearly ten years. (Ref. Commission Records, 1726-1788). His first and last commissions were dated 18 October 1739 and 22 October 1747. His service was continuous from 1739 until at least as late as 9 August 1748.

William Middleton's Deeds to His Children:

A deed dated 9 March 1735-6 and recorded 30 March 1736 recites that William Middleton "for the natural love and affection he beareth unto his daughter Eleanor Tyler, wife of Benjamin Tyler...conveyed to her one moiety of that part of His Lordship's Favour," situate between the lands of James Keech and John Abenethy, deceased, which he, William Middleton had bought of Thomas and James Abernethy.

In an unindexed Bill of Sale it is recorded that on 16 February 1743-4, Peter White, a carpenter, sold a negro man named Tomacoe to William Middleton who then endorsed it as follows: "I hereby assign the within Bill of Sale unto my son, Samuel Middleton, his heirs and assigns."

At the same time another Bill of Sale to William Middleton was recorded. It was from William Bryan who sold for L11 15s.5d., a negro boy named George. This Bill of Sale was assigned to Samuel Middleton.

By a deed dated 5 August 1748, William Middleton, Sr., conveyed "to Holland Middleton, William Middleton, Jr., and Robert Middleton, for L10 current money of Maryland and also for natural love and affection which I have unto my sons Holland, William and Robert" certain tracts which he describes: Holland Middleton to have his portion at the southernmost corner, and Robert to receive the western part. He then affected a redistribution of a previous transaction by providing that the land formerly belonging to Robert, containing 110 acres, was to go to William, Jr., who also was to receive the tract known as "Griffen's Seat." The endorsement on this deed is of special interest because of its wording: "William Middleton, Sr., acknowledged this land to be the right of inheritance of Holland Middleton, William Middleton, Jr., and Robert Middleton."

By a deed dated 6 May 1749, William Middleton, Jr., sold to Hugh Mitchell, also of Charles County, the above-mentioned 110 acres, described as "of manor land called Zachia Manor, subject to a life interest therein of himself, called William Middleton, Jr., party to these presents, Robert Middleton, and Hugh Middleton, sons of William Middleton, Sr. of Charles County.

This completes the thus-far discovered documentary evidence of the names of the children of William Middleton, Sr. -- Eleanor, Samuel, Holland, William, Jr., Robert and Hugh.

At various dates William Middleton owned, either by patent, resurvey, or purchase all or part of:

1720 -- Ye Meadows 400 acres
1730 -- Longpoint
1734 -- Three Brothers 250 acres
1737 -- Mudd's Rest 200 acres
1738 -- His Lordship's Favour 324 acres
1740 -- Griffen's Seat 254 acres
1742 -- Middleton's Rich Thicket 100 acres
1742 -- Middleton's Hope
1744 -- Addition to May Day 120 acres
1747 -- Thompson Town 100 acres
1747 -- Partner's Purchase 126 acres

Children of William and Elizabeth Teares Middleton

Eleanor Middleton, who was married to Benjamin Tyler as early as 9 March 1735-6; settled in Virginia.

Ruth Middleton, born 1712; married Benjamin Belt.

Samuel Middleton, died intestate somewhat before 28 June 1764; (Ref. Inventories, Vol. 84:228); he married Elizabeth Ward; died Charles County, Maryland, will date 1 July 1783; will proven 12 September 1784; (Ref. Charles County Wills, B-1; 393-394). He had issue: Horatio, Ann, and Samuel Ward. Son Horatio married Susannah Stoddert of the same family as Benjamin Stoddert, first secretary of U.S. Navy. Son, Samuel Ward married a Mrs. William Hooe Winter and their daughter, Catherine, was the mother of the Confederate Admiral Raphael Semmes. His mother was married at the Middleton family home "Locust Hill" in Charles County, Maryland soon after 1800.

Holland Middleton. This line is continued in the section "The Third Generation."

William Middleton, Jr., married Mary Coghill about 1740 or earlier, the daughter of William and Anne (Smallwood) Coghill. They made their home on the tract that William Middleton, Sr., had received by the will of Robert Robertson, and which William Middleton sold 6 May 1749 to Hugh Mitchell, subject to the life interest therein of himself and two of his brothers: "these three being sons of William Middleton, Sr., of Charles County, Maryland." (CC Deed Z-2). Children of William and Mary Coghill Middleton were Isaac Smallwood Middleton and Hugh Middleton.

Robert Middleton who married Anne______, was a witness to a deed in Prince William County, Virginia, 27 April 1761 (Ref. Middleton Papers, Semmes Collection, Maryland Historical Society) and moved to Georgia with brothers Holland and Hugh. He signed in Georgia 1770 "Sr." so the Colonel Robert Middleton who later signed his name "Jr.," in Georgia must have been his son. Other children of Robert Sr., are not known, neither is his place of death. Hugh C. Middleton of Augusta, Georgia, mentioned in his notes: "Pa always said he thought his Grandfather Hugh had two brothers to come to South Carolina with him and that one or both of them went to Kentucky." Robert Middleton, Jr. who married Elizabeth Haynie (sister of John Haynie who died in Columbia County, Georgia, in 1802-3) mentioned his sister, Elizabeth Middleton, in Mississippi. He was a Colonel in the Revolution in Georgia; also a member of the Georgia Legislature and a member of the Georgia Convention that ratified the U. S. Constitution. He lived in Richmond, Columbia and Green Counties, Georgia (later near Holland Middleton). About 1789-90, he went to Lexington, Kentucky, bought a lot of land, left much of it and floated with his family and goods down the Mississippi River on a raft to Natchez. There he bought a farm on the Louisiana side near Vidalia, and by 1805 was apparently dead. His daughter, Elizabeth, married in 1805 David Morgan (later General David Morgan). Reference marriage record on file in Natchez for Elizabeth and also another one on file around this time for Hatton Middleton. Although I don't have the proof with this "family name" Hatton, I believe he is probably a brother to Elizabeth (Middleton) Morgan.

Hugh Teare Middleton, born about 1730; died 30 November 1803 at his home, "Locust Dale," Edgefield County, South Carolina. He married four times and had three sets of children. The names of two of his wives are mentioned in the administration of his estate, Lucy Williams (3rd wife); and Agatha Garrett (4th wife). His children were Hugh Middleton who predeceased him and whose wife was born Mildred Martin; John Middleton; Martha (Middleton) Tenent; Sarah (Middleton) Quarles; Elizabeth Middleton who later married Alexander Speer; Mary Middleton; and Philadelphia Adelia Middleton who later married Andrew Calhoun Hamilton. (Note: Major Hugh's son, Hugh, Jr. died the summer of 1803 leaving a wife Mildred (daughter of Charles Martin), and a son William H. Middleton. Mildred Middleton, his widow, married in 1804, Captain Samuel Savage, Jr. They moved to Alabama near Florence. In the county court records of Florence, there have been the names, Samuel Savage and William H. Middleton (1820s) on the same papers. One of them mentions John Middleton in Edgefield County, South Carolina and Hugh Middleton Jr., father of William H. Middleton.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ourpage/middleton2.htm 
Middleton, William (I0778)
 
2195 William S. Askew, a prominent citizen of Newnan, was born in Coweta county, Ga., Jan, 1, 1841. His father, James P. Askew, son of William S. and Mary Askew, both natives of North Carolina, came to Georgia with his parents when six years of age, settling in Hancock county, where he grew to manhood. He was a soldier in the war of 1836, and his father was a soldier in the revolutionary war. William S. Askew, the subject of this sketch, attended school in an old log schoolhouse after fodder-pulling time and his education was very limited. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Newnan guards, the first company to leave Coweta county. After one year, the company being reorganized, he was connected with the Forth Georgia regiment. In July 1861, he was captured at Laurel Hill, but made his escape; his health failed, however, and for about five weeks he was cut off from his men. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in the company commanded by Capt. Pittman, serving until 1862, when his time expired, but at the same time he re-enlisted under Capt. J. D. Sims, and served until September, 1863, when he was again captured and taken to Camp Morton at Indianapolis, Ind., and then to Fort Delaware, where he was held a prisoner until March 10, 1865, when he was paroled, this ending his war life. He was in some very hard-fought battles, among which were: Laurel Hill, Huntsville, Richmond, Kentucky and Jonesboro, and was captured at Blountville, Tenn. After the war he returned to Newnan, and began farming, and was also engaged in the mercantile business until 1875, when he was elected sheriff of Coweta county, serving two years. In 1891 he and W. L. Cruce built a large-sized corn-mill and also handled all kinds of building material. On Sept. 19, 1893, Mr. Askew bought his partner?s interest and since then has been sole proprietor. On March 3, 1867, Mr. Askew was married to Miss Samantha Scoggans, daughter of Barton and Eliza (Bird) Scroggans, to who children have been born, three of whom are living: Olive May, Eugene and Anna E. Mrs. Askew was born and reared in Coweta county and both she and her husband are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Askew is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is well liked by all who know him.

Memoirs of Georgia, (Athens, Ga.: Digital Library of Georgia, 2007), Vol 1, 520-521.

 
Askew, William Sanford (I1197)
 
2196 WILLIAM T. HUGULEY, banker, manufacturer, and editor, West Point, Ga., was born in Chambers Coounty, Ala.February 38, 1857. His father, William H. Huguley, is a native of Wilkes County, Ga., born September 12, 1830, and is the son of Goerge and Polly (Dallis) Huguley, the former of whom was born in Wilkes County in 1809, was a planter, and died in 1886. Mrs. Polly Huguley was born in Lincoln County, Ga., in 1811, was a daughter of Thomas Dallis, and died in 1849. Of her children three are living, viz.: William H., George W., and Mary E. Of these William H. was taken to Troup County at the age of two years, and there educated until 1848, when he moved to Chambers County, Ala., where he resided and engaged in planting until 1877, when he settled in West Point, Ga., and established a general supply store, which he still continues. For ten years he has been president of the Alabama & Georgia Manufacturing Co., of which mention will be made further on. In 1855 he married Miss Fannie Nolan, daughter of James Nolan, of Georgia, and this union was blessed by the birth of one child, William T., whose name heads this sketch. Mrs. Fannie Huguley died in 1866, and Mr. Huguley next married Miss Cordie Glanton, daughter of Abner Glanton, and the fruit of this marriage was also one child, George Abuer. The death of Mrs. Cordie Huguley took place in 1870, and for his third wife Mr. Huguley took Miss Fannie H. Sharpe, daughter of Oscar W. Sharpe, of Alabama, and of the children that were born to this union four are living, viz.: Harrell D., Oscar W., William H., and Amos. Mr. Huguley is a Royal Arch Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.

William T. Huguley graduated from the State University of Georgia, at Athens, in 1875, with the degree of A. B. He naturally turned his attention to business, and joined his father in his many industrial enterprises. He is one of the editors and proprietors of the Sonthern Alliance, which, by virtue of size, equipment, superior ability, and overwhelming circulation, is practically the State organ of the Farmers' Alliance. The State and the farmers rest assured in the courage, conservatism, and noble disinterestedness of its editor. He is in every essential of justice, discretion, kindness, firmuess, and patriotism, worthy of the profound responsibility which rests upon him.

Of the interests Mr. Hugnley has in other business operations a few extracts from local journals will give only a faint idea, but will probably suffice for the purpose of this work. First we mention the Union Milling and Manufacturing Co. This is one of those diversified industries which is a blessing to every community, and just such a one as the Farmers' Alliance contemplates establishing in the various localities. There are five different departments, each of which is conducted separately and systematically, as follows: The grist department. There are three runs of stone and a complete equipment of milling machinery; capacity one car load (400 bushels) of the finest meal daily, which is sold to the merchants of West Point, LaFayette, Cusseta, Gabbettville, and the consumers generally. Mr. M. S. Kirby, one of the best millers in the country, is in charge. The 'manufacturing department consists of thirty-two looms and complete equipment for the manufacture of duck and sheeting. Capacity nearly three thousand yards per day. Superintendent, Mr. Charles K. Day. The cotton batting department consists of fourteen batting cards, and a complete and modern system of bat machinery. The daily capacity is about one hundred bales or three thousand pounds, consuming six or seven bales of linters or re-ginnings from the cotton seed, per day. In this company William T. Huguley has a large interest.

The Alabama & Georgia Manufacturing Co. is one of the largest-duck mills in the country, and its well known brands, the « West Point Standard," and "Western Standard," are well known all over the country. This mill was built in 1868. The main building is of stone and brick, 60 x 250, four stories high. The cost of construction about $85,000. The picker building is of stone, 60 x 80 feet; two stories and basement. Cost about $10,000. There are also commodious warehouses, boiler and pump houses, and about fifty operative houses?all representing a cost of about $35,000. The machinery consists of two hundred looms, seven thousand spindles and sixty cards?and complete outfit for the manufacture of cotton duck ?all of the latest and most approved English and American make." Cost over $200,000. The mill at present consumes about fifteen bales of cotton, and turns out abont.eleven thousand yards per day, or say five thousand bales of cotton, and turns out 3,500,000 yards per annum. The first president was George Hugnley, who was succeeded by his son, W. H. Huguley, and he in turn by his son, W. T. Huguley, in 1885?the succession covering three generations. The present officers are: W. T. Huguley, president ; W. H. Huguley, vice-pres ident; W. H. Huguley & Co., secretary and treasurer;William Brown, superintendent. The total cost of the property to date $325,000, and about $100,000 is required for working capital. The business done will amount to say $350,000 per annum.

The mercantile house of W. H. Huguley & Co. was established in reality by the grangers. In 1875, when the grange movement was at its best, and the interest on the part of the fanners was strongly enlisted, the grangers determined upon the establishment of a depot of supplies, and to this end solicited the co-operation of Dr. Lawrence Smith, W. H. and W. T. Huguley, and T. F. Nolan, all planters, representing in the aggregate about ten thousand acres of land, which they were then practically cultivating as farmers and grangers. These gentlemen, having themselves to provide supplies for their laborers, and being promised the exclusive business of the grange organization, determined to apply the experiment. Under the name of Smith, Huguley & Nolan, they floated the business, which was liberally patronized from the first. In 1878 Dr. Smith retired, whereupon the firm name was changed to W. H. Huguley ife Co., which it has retained ever since. With the exception of the substitution of J. H. Nolan for his brother, T. F. Nolan, the firm has run on uninterruptedly up to the present time. On October 1, 1886, a banking department was established. Each department of this extensive business is conducted under separate and distinct managements. For example, the senior, W. H. Huguley, assisted by \V. A. Burdett, continues to look after the planting interest, his life-long vocation. The merchandise department is under the management of J. H. Nolan, assisted by Messrs. B. E. Saterwhite, G.A. Hugnley, N. C. Causey, J. W. Burdett, and E. No.an. The warehouse is in charge of J. T. Higginbothem, and Major B. F. Reed is the veteran cotton buyer. The banking and manufacturing departments are under the management of W. T. Huguley, assisted byWilliam Brown, and an able corps of accountants. This house handles yearly about eight thousand bales of cotton, and carries stocks of cotton, plantation supplies, etc., averaging over $100,000. Their special cotton correspondents are Lehman Bros., New York, Lehman, Stern & Co., New Orleans, and S. M. Inman & Co., Atlanta, Ga. 
Huguley, William Thomas (I10410)
 
2197 WILLIAM the Conqueror (1027?-1087), king of England, natural son of Robert II, duke of Normandy, by Herleva or Arlette, daughter of Fulbert, a tanner of Falaise, whence he was called "the Bastard," was born at Falaise in 1027 or 1028 (Will. of Jumièges, vi. 12, vii. 18, 44; Freeman, Norman Conquest, ii. 581?90). His mother also bore, probably to Robert, Adeliza, wife of Enguerrand of Ponthieu (ib.; Archæologia, xxvi. 349). After Robert's death she married Herlwin of Conteville, by whom she had Odo [q. v.], bishop of Bayeux, Robert of Mortain [see Mortain], and a daughter Muriel. When Robert was setting out on his pilgrimage he caused his lords to elect William as his successor, and to swear fealty to him. Accordingly on the news of his death, in 1035, William became duke, having as guardians Alan, count of Brittany, Osbern the seneschal, and Gilbert of Eu, and being under the charge of one Turold. Disturbances broke out immediately. Many of his lords were disloyal, for they despised him for his birth, they built themselves fortresses and committed acts of violence. Alan was poisoned, and Gilbert and Turold were murdered. An attempt was made to seize William's person at Vaudreuil; Osbern, who slept in his room, was slain, but William was carried off by his mother's brother Walter, who concealed him in the dwellings of some poor people.

As William grew older he proved himself brave and wise. By the advice of his lords he appointed as his guardian Ralph de Wacy, who had slain Gilbert of Eu, and gave him command of his forces. While the number of those who were loyal to him increased, many were secretly disloyal and intrigued against him with Henry I, the French king. Henry complained that the border fortress of Tillières was an annoyance to him, and the duke's counsellors ordered its destruction. The castellan, William Crispin, only yielded the place at William's express command. The French burnt it and made a raid in the Hiemois. The governor of the country revolted and garrisoned Falaise against the duke, but the castle was taken and he was banished. William and his counsellors advocated the adoption of the truce of God which was accepted by the Normans at the council of Caen in 1042. In 1047 Guy, the lord of Brionne and Vernon, son of the count of Burgundy by Adeliza, daughter of Richard II of Normandy, and the duke's companion in boyhood, hoping to gain the whole, or a good part, of his cousin's duchy, conspired against him with the lords of the Cotentin and Bessin, inciting them not to obey ?a degenerate bastard.? The eastern, or more French, portion of the duchy remained faithful to William; the western, or more Scandinavian, portion rebelled. An attempt was made to seize the duke at Valognes; he narrowly escaped, rode alone through the night to Rye, and thence reached Falaise. He went to Poissy to meet King Henry and obtained his help. The duke and the king joined forces and defeated the rebels at Val-ès-dunes, near Caen. William then took Brionne. He ordered Guy to remain in his court, and afterwards allowed him to go to Burgundy; the other rebel lords were punished by fines and by the destruction of the castles which they had built without license; the lord who had attempted to seize the duke was imprisoned at Rouen and died there. The duke's victory established his power throughout Normandy.

In return for Henry's help William in 1048 joined him in a war against Geoffrey Martel, count of Anjou. The duke was resolved to take his place as pre-eminent among his barons in battle, and showed so much daring that the king warned him to be less adventurous. Though, so far as the French were concerned, the campaign was short, it led to a war between William and Geoffrey, in which the duke regained Domfront and Alençon, fortresses on the border of Maine, then virtually under the rule of Geoffrey. While besieging Domfront he challenged Geoffrey to a personal combat, but the count, though he accepted the challenge, retreated without meeting him. At Alençon the inhabitants jeered at William by beating hides on their walls, and calling him "tanner." In revenge he cut off the hands and feet of thirty-two of them. At the end of the war he raised fortifications at Ambrières, in Maine itself. In 1051 William visited England, and must have found himself at home among the Normans and Frenchmen of the court of his cousin, Edward the Confessor [q. v.], who probably during his visit promised that he should succeed him. Meanwhile he was with the advice of his lords seeking to marry Matilda, daughter of the Count of Flanders, an alliance of great political importance, both on account of the count's power and the situation of his dominions. The marriage was forbidden by Leo IX at the council of Reims in 1049 [see under Matilda (d. 1083) and Lanfranc], and in consequence was not celebrated until 1053. Malger, archbishop of Rouen, the duke's uncle, threatened, and perhaps pronounced, excommunication against the duke; but William gained over Lanfranc to his side, and finally Nicolas II granted a dispensation for the marriage in 1059. In accordance with the pope's commands on this occasion William built the abbey of St. Stephen at Caen.

An unimportant revolt of the lord of Eu was followed in 1053 by the revolt of William of Arques, one of the duke's uncles and brother of Archbishop Malger. This William, who had constantly been disloyal to his nephew, was upheld by the French king, who marched to the relief of Arques when it was invested by the duke. To avoid fighting in person against his liege lord, the duke left the siege for a while to William Giffard. The French suffered in a skirmish at St. Aubin, and retired without relieving the place, which surrendered to the duke. The garrison made an abject submission, and William allowed his uncle to leave the duchy. Jealous of the almost kingly power of the duke, Henry of France formed a league against him with some of his great vassals and invaded the duchy on both sides of the Seine early in 1054. To meet this pressing danger, William also divided his force into two bodies, and himself led one of them to operate against the division commanded by the king on the left of the river, giving some of his lords the command of the force which was to oppose the army led by the king's brother Eudes and others on the right of the river. The army of Eudes was surprised and routed at Mortemer, and one of its leaders, Guy, count of Ponthieu, was taken prisoner. William, who was near the king's army when he heard of the victory of his lords, sent one of his followers to climb a tree or rock near the French camp by night and announce it to the king's army, and on hearing the news Henry hastily retreated into France.

Peace was made with France in 1055, and William, with the king's good-will, turned on the Count of Anjou. He ordered that the fortification of Ambrières should be pressed forward, and sent to tell Geoffrey that he would be there within forty days to meet him. Geoffrey of Mayenne, whose town lay near Ambrières, entreated the count's help against the Normans. The count promised that it should be given, but allowed the works to be completed. He then besieged the place in conjunction with the Count of Aquitaine and a force from Brittany. William at once prepared to go to its relief, and on hearing that he was coming Geoffrey raised the siege. Geoffrey of Mayenne, who had been taken prisoner by the Normans, renounced his fealty to the count and did homage to William. About this time also William received homage from Guy, count of Ponthieu, who, in return for his release from prison, bound himself to do the duke military service (Ord. Vit. p. 658).

William was highly displeased by the unseemly life and extravagance of Archbishop Malger, and often reproved him both publicly and in private. He was also angered by the line that his uncle had taken with reference to his marriage, and further suspected him of complicity in the revolt of his brother William of Arques. Accordingly he took advantage of the visit of a papal legate to Normandy to depose the archbishop, acting in this in unison with the legate at a synod held at Rouen. He banished Malger to Guernsey, and at an ecclesiastical council held in his presence in the same year (1055) caused the election of Maurilius, a French monk of Fécamp, a man of learning and holy life, to the see of Rouen. After about three years of peace, Henry for the third time invaded Normandy, in conjunction with Geoffrey of Anjou, in August 1058. The allies did much damage to the country, ravaging the Hiemois and the Bessin, and burning Caen before, as it seems, William could gather a sufficient force to meet them. While their army was crossing the Dive, and after the king and the vanguard had already crossed, William, at the head of a small company, suddenly fell on the remainder of the army at Varaville and cut it to pieces before the eyes of the king, who was prevented by the rising tide from sending any succour to his men. On this disaster the king and Geoffrey speedily returned home.

The deaths of Henry and Count Geoffrey in 1060 secured William from further attacks, for Henry's successor, Philip I, was young, and his guardian was the Count of Flanders, William's father-in-law, while the new Count of Anjou, Geoffrey the Bearded, was far less powerful than his uncle had been. William had made himself feared or respected by foreign powers, and was absolute master in his duchy both in things ecclesiastical and civil. He banished several lords whom he suspected of disaffection, not always justly, for he sometimes acted on false and malicious accusations. Among others, he deposed and banished Robert, abbot of St. Evroul, brother of Hugh (d. 1094) [q. v.] of Grantmesnil, though he had not been condemned by synodical authority. About two years later Robert, who had laid his case before Nicolas II, returned to Normandy in company with two cardinals, and went with them to Lillebonne, where the duke then was, to claim his abbey. William was greatly enraged, and declared that, though he would receive the legates, he would promptly hang on the highest oak of the nearest forest any monk of his duchy who dared to make a charge against him. On hearing this Robert left the duchy in haste (ib. p. 482). At a council held at Caen by the duke's authority in 1061, it was decreed that every evening a bell should be rung as an invitation to prayer, and a signal for all to shut their doors and not to go forth again. This was the origin of the curfew which was afterwards introduced into England. On the death of Geoffrey Martel, William, who had let no opportunity slip of gaining power in Maine, was enabled to prosecute the claim to that land which he derived from an alleged grant to his ancestor Hrolf or Rollo. Herbert, the young heir of the last count of Maine, in the hope of gaining possession of his inheritance, commended himself and his country to the duke in 1061; it was agreed that he should marry one of the duke's daughters, that if he died childless William should have Maine, and that the count's eldest sister Margaret should marry William's eldest son Robert. Herbert died unmarried in 1063, when Robert was still a child. The people of Maine were unwilling to submit to William, and were headed by Walter of Mantes, who claimed the country in right of his wife Biota, aunt of Herbert. William ravaged the land, and compelled Le Mans to surrender, while a Norman army ravaged Walter's own territories and forced him to submit to the duke. Both Walter and Biota died suddenly, and, it is said, while they were with the duke at Falaise. In after years William's enemies asserted that he had poisoned them (ib. pp. 487?8, 534). Geoffrey of Mayenne continued for a while to resist the duke in Maine, who punished him by taking Mayenne. Robert's intended wife Margaret was brought to Normandy, and died there before reaching marriageable age.

In 1064, when Conan, count of Brittany, was threatening to invade the duchy, William caused Guy of Ponthieu to deliver to him Harold (1022? -1066) [q. v.], then earl of Wessex, who had been shipwrecked on the coast of Ponthieu. Taking Harold with him, he frightened the Britons away from before Dol, and compelled Conan to surrender Dinan. Before Harold was allowed to leave Normandy William obtained an oath from him, sworn on some relics which, it is said, were concealed from him until after the oath was taken, that he would uphold the duke's claim to succeed to the English throne on the king's death [see under Harold, u.s.]. William, who was a kinsman of Edward the Confessor (both being descended from Duke Richard the Fearless), having thus obtained an oath from Harold as well as a promise of the succession from Edward (Will. of Poitiers, p. 108; Eadmer, col. 350; Will. of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum, ii. c. 228), heard with anger that immediately on Edward's death Harold had, on 6 Jan. 1066, been crowned king. The tidings came to him when he was going forth to hunt near Rouen, and he determined, on the advice, it is said, of his seneschal, William Fitzosbern (d. 1071) [q. v.], to take im- mediate action. He sent a messenger to Harold, calling on him to fulfil his oath. On his refusal the duke, by the advice of his special counsellors, summoned an assembly of his barons to meet at Lillebonne.

Meanwhile he sent Gilbert, archdeacon of Lisieux, to obtain the sanction of the pope, Alexander II, for his proposed war. In addition to William's claim, founded on kinship and the bequest of Edward, William's ambassador advanced the perjury of Harold, and the causes of offence given by the English, such as the expulsion of Archbishop Robert of Jumièges. The duke's ambassador doubtless promised that his master would improve the ecclesiastical condition of England, and bring it into close obedience to the Roman see (Will. of Poitiers, p. 124). Nevertheless he met with violent opposition from many of the cardinals, on the ground that the church should not sanction slaughter; but the duke's cause was espoused by Archdeacon Hildebrand (Gregory VII), and, acting on his advice, the pope sent William his blessing, a ring, with a relic of St. Peter, and a consecrated banner, so that his expedition had something of the character of a crusade (Monumenta Gregoriana, p. 414). The barons at Lillebonne objected to the proposals made to them by William Fitzosbern, and the duke obtained promises from them of ships and men by personally soliciting each baron singly. He received a visit from Earl Tostig [q. v.], and encouraged him to invade England in May. As he desired help from other lands, he sent embassies to the German king, Henry, and to Sweyn of Denmark, and is said himself to have met Philip of France,who was adverse to his project. Volunteers from many lands, and specially from France and Flanders, joined him, in the hope of plunder and of grants of land in England, and he and his lords set about preparing a fleet. During these preparations his old enemy, Conan of Brittany, died, poisoned, it was believed, by his chamberlain, though William was afterwards accused of having poisoned him, but that was probably mere abuse (Will. of Jumièges, vii. 33; Ord. Vit. p. 534). In a council that he held in June he appointed Lanfranc abbot of St. Stephen's at Caen, and shortly afterwards was present at the consecration of Matilda's church in that city and the dedication of his daughter Cicely.

The Norman fleet assembled at the mouth of the Dive in the middle of August, was delayed there for a month by contrary winds, and sailed, with some losses by shipwreck and desertion, to St. Valery about 12 Sept. There it waited for a south wind for fifteen days, during which William made constant prayers for the desired wind, and finally caused the relics of St. Valery to be borne in a solemn procession. On the 27th the south wind blew and the fleet sailed, William embarking in the Mora, the ship given him by his wife, whom he left in charge of the duchy. The passage was made by night, and a landing was effected without resistance at Pevensey on the 28th, the third day after the battle of Stamford Bridge. The story that the duke on landing fell to the ground, and that this was turned to a lucky omen either by William himself, or a sailor crying out that he took ?seisin? of the kingdom, is probably an adaptation of the story of Cæsar's landing in Africa (Freeman, iii. 407). His army perhaps consisted of from twenty-five to thirty thousand men, but no certain estimate is possible. He fortified his camp at Hastings and ravaged the country. Harold marched against him from London on 11 Oct., and took up his position on the hill afterwards called Battle, eight miles from Hastings, and messages passed between them. On the morning of the 14th the duke received the communion, arrayed his army in three divisions, himself taking command of the centre, which was composed of Normans, the soldiers of Brittany and Maine composing the left, and the French and Flemings the right wing; vowed that if he was victorious he would build a monastery on the place of battle in honour of St. Martin, and made an address to his army. He rode a horse given him by Alfonso VI, of Leon and Castille, and in the course of the battle showed great personal courage as well as good generalship. He was thought to be slain, and a panic ensued; he bared his head so as to be recognised and rallied his men; his horse was killed by Gyrth [q. v.]; he slew Gyrth and mounted another horse; three horses were slain under him, but he remained unwounded (for the details of the battle see Freeman, u.s. pp. 467?508, 756?73; attacked in Quarterly Review, July 1892; defended and further attacked in English Hist. Review, October 1893, January and April 1894; Oman, Art of War in the Middle Ages, pp. 149?63; {[sc|Round}}, Feudal England, pp. 352 seq.). The Norman victory was complete and Harold was slain. After the battle William remained for five days at Hastings, when, finding that the English did not come to offer their submission, he marched to Romney, and avenged some of his men who had been slain there before the battle; thence he marched to Dover, where he remained about a week, then went northwards, being delayed a short time near Canterbury by illness, and thence went on to Southwark, the line of his march being marked by ravages. A skirmish took place at Southwark, to which he set fire, and, finding that London did not make submission, he turned away, marched through Surrey and Hampshire, and on to Wallingford in Berkshire, where he received the submission of Archbishop Stigand [q. v.], and crossed the Thames. After further ravages (see Engl. Hist. Review, January 1898, on "The Conqueror's Footprints," a suggestive paper, though perhaps seeking to prove too much), he finally came to Berkhampstead in Hertfordshire. The Londoners, finding themselves surrounded by devastated lands, submitted to him, and the great men who were in the city, Edgar Atheling [q. v.], Aldred (d. 1096) [q. v.], archbishop of York, and others, came to him, and invited him to assume the crown. He received them graciously. Refusing to allow Stigand, whose position was uncanonical, to consecrate him, he was crowned, after taking the coronation oath, by Aldred at Westminster on 25 Dec. The ceremony was disturbed by his Norman guards, who, mistaking the shouts of the people for an insurrection, set fire to buildings round the abbey. The people rushed from the church, leaving the king, the bishops, and the clergy in great fear.

In consequence of this affair William determined to curb the power of the citizens; he left London and stayed for some days at Barking in Essex, while fortifications were raised in the city. At Barking possibly he granted his charter to London. He received the submission of the great men of the north, of Earls Edwin [q. v.] and Morcar [q. v.], of Copsige [q. v.], Waltheof [q. v.], and others. Succeeding as king to the crown lands, he confiscated the lands of those who had fought against him, and, holding that all the laity had incurred forfeiture, allowed the landholders generally to redeem their lands in whole or in part, receiving them back as a grant from himself. During his whole reign he punished resistance by confiscation (Freeman, iv. 22?9). Early in 1067 he set out on a progress through various parts of the kingdom for the purpose, as it seems, of taking over confiscated estates, establishing order, and strengthening his power by setting on foot the building of castles. He met with no opposition, and showed indulgence to the poorer and weaker people. After appointing his brother Odo, whom he made earl of Kent, and William Fitzosbern, whom he made earl of Hereford, as regent, and giving posts to others, he visited Normandy in Lent, taking with him several leading Englishmen. He was received with great rejoicing at Rouen, held his court at Easter at Fécamp, where he displayed the spoils of England, enriched many Norman churches with them, attended dedications of churches, and sent Lanfranc on an embassy to Rome on the affairs of the duchy.

William returned to England on 7 Dec. During his absence disturbances had broken out in Kent, in Herefordshire, and in the north, where Copsige, whom William had made earl, was slain, and an invitation had been sent to Sweyn Estrithson of Denmark to invade England. The Kentish insurrection had been quelled, and William made many confiscations. In the hope of averting Danish invasion he sent an embassy to Sweyn and to the archbishop of Bremen. He appointed a new earl in Copsige's place and laid a heavy tax on the kingdom. An insurrection, headed by Harold's sons at Exeter, having broken out in the west in 1068, William marched thither with English troops, ravaging as he went. He compelled Exeter to surrender, had a castle built there, and subdued the west country. Rebels gathered at York, and the king, after occupying Warwick, where Edwin and Morcar, who were concerned in the revolt, made their peace with him, and receiving the submission of the central districts, advanced to York, which made no resistance to him. As he returned he visited other parts of the country, and caused castles to be built in various towns. About this time he dismissed his foreign mercenaries after rewarding them liberally. Early in 1069 Robert of Comines, to whom he had given an earldom north of the Tees, was slain with his men at Durham, and a revolt in favour of Edgar was made at York, where the castle was besieged. William marched to its relief, defeated the rebels, and caused a second castle to be built to curb the city. Harold's sons, who, sailing from Ireland, had made a raid on the west in the preceding year, again came over with Viking crews and plundered in Devonshire. They were promptly put to flight; but it was doubtless in connection with their expedition that the fleet of Sweyn of Denmark, after some plundering descents, sailed into the Humber in September, and being joined by Edgar, Waltheof, and other English leaders, burnt York. Other revolts broke out, in the west where the rebels were defeated by the bishop of Coutances, on the Welsh border, and in Staffordshire, the movements being without concert. William, who was surprised and enraged at the news from York, marched into Lindsey, where the Danish ships were laid up, destroyed some Danish holds, and, leaving a force there, crushed the revolt in Staffordshire, and entered York without opposition. He then laid waste all the country between York and Durham, burning crops, cattle, houses, and property of all kinds, so that the whole land was turned into a desert and the people perished with hunger. After keeping Christmas amid the ruins of York, he marched to the Tees in January 1070, received the submission of Waltheof and others, committed further ravages, returned to York, and thence set out for Chester. The winter weather made his march difficult; some of his men deserted and many perished. The fall of Chester ended the revolt in that district, and was followed by ravages in Cheshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, and Derbyshire. The Danish fleet having been bribed to leave the coast after the winter, all resistance was at an end and the conquest of England was complete (ib. pp. 320-22).

At Easter two legates came to England by William's request, and one remained with him for a year. Their coming enabled him to carry out part of his policy with respect to the church. Stigand was deposed and Lanfranc was made archbishop in his place. Three other English bishops, and in time many abbots, were also deposed, and vacancies were filled up by foreign prelates, only two sees being occupied by native bishops by the end of 1070 ({[sc|Stubbs}}, Constitutional History, i. 282). As he had done in Normandy, so also in England, William generally tried to appoint men of learning and good character; he avoided simony, and, though his appointments were not always successful and his abbots were not generally so worthy as his bishops, the prelates that he introduced were, taken together, men of a higher stamp than their predecessors. At the same time, his changes entailed much hardship on English churchmen, and his church appointments were often made as rewards for secular service. All disorder was abhorrent to him. He was masterful in his dealings with the church as in all else, and, though elections were often made in ecclesiastical assemblies, his will was evidently not less obeyed than in cases in which his personal action is more apparent. With Lanfranc he worked in full accord, and his general policy may be described as that of organising the church as a separate department of government under the direction of the archbishop as his vicegerent in ecclesiastical matters, in opposition to the English system by which ecclesiastical and civil affairs were largely administered by the same machinery. This policy worked well in his time, but it was necessary to its success that the throne and the see of Canterbury should be filled by men of like mind and aims to those of William and Lanfranc. William upheld Lanfranc's claim to the obedience of the see of York because it was politically expedient to depress the power of the northern metropolitan. In accordance with his system church councils were held distinct from, though generally at the same time as, the secular councils of the realm. He also separated ecclesiastical from secular jurisdiction, ordering that no bishop or archdeacon should thenceforward hear ecclesiastical pleas in the hundred court, but in courts of their own, and should try them by canon law, obedience being enforced by excommunication, which, if necessary, would be backed up by the civil power (ib. pp. 283?4). Although he brought the church into closer relations with the papacy, from which he had obtained help both in his invasion and his ecclesiastical arrangements, he was far from being subservient to popes. About 1076 a legate came to him from Gregory demanding that he should do fealty to the pope and send Peter's pence. He replied that he would send the money as his predecessors had done, but would not do fealty, for he had never promised it and his predecessors had not done it (Lanfranc, Ep. 10). The pope blamed him for Lanfranc's neglect of his summons to Rome (Monumenta Gregoriana, p. 367). He laid down three rules as necessary to his kingly rights: he would allow no Roman pontiff to be acknowledged in his dominions as apostolic without his command, nor any papal letter to be received that had not been shown to him; no synod might make any enactment that he had not sanctioned and previously ordained; no ecclesiastical censure was to be pronounced against any of his barons or officers without his consent. All things, temporal and spiritual, depended on his will (Eadmer, Historia Novorum, col. 352).

Extending the license that they had received from William, the Danes had not sailed in May 1070; and their appearance at Ely encouraged a revolt of the fen country. They left England in June, but the revolt continued, and was headed by Hereward [q. v.] In 1071 the rebels held the Isle of Ely, and the revolt, though isolated, became serious. William in person attacked the island with ships and a land force. He reduced it in the course of the year, punished the rebels with mutilation or lifelong imprisonment, fined the monastery of Ely, and caused a castle to be built in its precinct. Early in 1072 he was in Normandy where he held a parliament and addressed an ecclesiastical synod. Returning to England he invaded Scotland, for Malcolm had been ravaging the north, and made his court a refuge for William's enemies. He advanced to Abernethy, where Malcolm did him homage. On his return he founded a castle at Durham and committed it to the bishop to hold against the Scots.
The citizens of Le Mans having, after domestic conflicts, called in Fulk, count of Anjou, William in 1073 led an army largely composed of English into Maine, wasted it, received the submission of the city, defended his allies against Fulk, and, having made peace with him, returned to England in 1074. Then he again visited Normandy, apparently leaving Lanfranc as his chief representative in England. During his absence Ralph Guader [q. v.], earl of Norfolk, and Roger, earl of Hereford, conspired against him. Waltheof, who was concerned in the conspiracy, went to William in Normandy, confessed, and asked forgiveness. The rebels were overthrown in the absence of the king, who, returning to England in 1075, found the Danish fleet in the Humber; it had been invited over by the rebels, but after plundering York the Danes sailed off, for they dared not meet the king. William punished those of the rebels that he had in his power, blinding and mutilating the Briton followers of Earl Ralph, and in May 1076 caused Waltheof to be beheaded?the only capital punishment that he inflicted during his reign. Possibly about this time (Freeman, u. s. p. 609) he laid waste a district in Hampshire extending for thirty miles or more to form the New Forest, in order to gratify his love of hunting, driving away the inhabitants and destroying churches and houses (Flor. Wig. an. 1100; Will. of Malm. iii. c. 275).

Hoping to seize Earl Ralph, who had escaped to Brittany, and also to enlarge his dominions, he crossed to Normandy and laid siege to Dol, swearing not to depart until it surrendered; but Philip of France came to the help of Count Alan, and William fled, leaving his camp and much treasure in the hands of the enemy. He made peace with the count, and in 1077 with Philip. About that time his eldest son, Robert (1054??1134) [q. v.], demanded that Normandy and Maine should be made over to him, and, on William's refusal, rebelled and attempted to seize Rouen, for he had a party in the duchy. William ordered his arrest, but he fled from Normandy; his mother sent him supplies, and William was in consequence highly displeased with her (Ord. Vit. p. 571). With Philip's help Robert established himself at Gerberoi, near Beauvais, and William besieged him there early in 1080. In a skirmish beneath the walls William was unhorsed and wounded in the hand by his son. He raised the siege, and was persuaded by his queen, his lords, and the French king to be reconciled with Robert and his friends. On the murder of Walcher [q. v.], bishop of Durham, he sent Bishop Odo to punish the insurgents, and shortly afterwards sent Robert with an army into Scotland, for Malcolm had again been invading Northumberland. He was in England in 1081, and Robert again quarrelled with him, and finally left him. In that year he made an expedition into Wales, freed many hundred captives there, received the submission of the Welsh princes, and is said to have made a pilgrimage to St. David's (A.-S. Chron. an. 1081; Hen. of Hunt. p. 207; Ann. Cambr. an. 1079).

William was again in Normandy in 1082, when he heard that his brother Odo, to whom he had committed the regency in England during his late frequent visits to the duchy, was about to make an expedition into Italy. He crossed in haste, caught him in the Isle of Wight, and, having gathered his lords, laid before them his complaints against Odo, accusing him of oppression and misgovernment in his absence and of a design to lead abroad forces needed for the defence of the kingdom. He caused him to be arrested, and, when Odo objected that he was a clerk, replied that he was not arresting a bishop but one of his earls whom he had made his viceroy; he kept him in prison until his own death was near, in spite of the remonstrances of the pope (Ord. Vit. p. 647; Monumenta Gregoriana, pp. 518, 570). He returned to Normandy, where in 1083 died his queen Matilda, for whom he mourned deeply. An insurrection in Maine, headed by Hubert de Beaumont, caused him trouble. He personally led an army against Hubert's castle, but left the war to be prosecuted by his lords, who carried it on for three years without success.

Cnut, or Canute the Saint, king of Denmark, threatened to invade England in 1085. William gathered a force to meet him, crossed to England, and, quartering his soldiers on his vassals, wasted the coasts, that the Danes might find no sustenance on landing. The invasion was not made, and William dismissed part of his force, keeping some part with him during the winter. After much discussion with his lords at a court that he held at Gloucester at Christmas, he ordered a survey of his kingdom. This survey, the object of which seems to have been to ascertain and apportion every landholder's liability with respect to taxation and military service, caused much indignation among the English; its results are embodied in Domesday book. William remained in England, held his courts according to custom at Easter 1086 at Winchester, and at Whitsuntide at Westminster, apparently travelled about the kingdom, and on 1 Aug. at a great assembly at Salisbury required that all men, whether holding immediately of the crown or of a mesne lord, should do fealty to him. All present at the assembly, ?whose men soever they were,? did so. The doctrine thus established, that the fealty owed to the king could not be overridden by an obligation to any inferior lord, saved England from the worst evils of feudalism. William heavily fined all against whom he could bring any charge, true or false; stayed in the Isle of Wight while the money was being collected, and then sailed off with it to Normandy.

A long-standing dispute as to the right to the French Vexin came to a head in 1087, when the French garrison in Mantes committed some ravages in the duke's dominions. William, who had become unwieldy through fat, was at Rouen seeking to reduce his bulk by medicine. Hearing that Philip had compared him to a woman in childbed, he swore his special oath, ?by the splendour and resurrection of God,? that he would light a hundred thousand candles when he went to his churching mass. He invaded the Vexin in August, ravaged the land, entered Mantes on the 15th, and burnt it. As he rode through the town his horse threw him forward in the saddle, and he received an internal injury. He was carried to Rouen, and was taken from his palace to the priory of St. Gervase for the sake of quiet. There he was attended by his bishops, sent for Anselm [q. v.], who was unable to go to him, repented of his sins, and ordered that his treasure should be distributed between the poor and churches. He directed that Robert should succeed him in Normandy; expressed his wish that his son William, who was with him, might succeed him in England; left Henry, who was also with him, a sum of money; and ordered that his prisoners should be released. He died on 9 Sept. His lords forthwith rode off to defend their lands from plunder, and his servants, after seizing all they could find, left his body uncared for. A knight named Herlwin had it borne to Caen and buried in St. Stephen's, the Conqueror's own church. The ceremony was interrupted by a claim made to the land on which the church was built, and William's son Henry and the bishops present satisfied the claimant's demand. The monument raised by William Rufus to his father was destroyed by the Huguenots in 1562, and the king's bones were scattered. A later tomb was destroyed in 1793, when the last bone left was lost (Freeman, u. s. pp. 721?3).

William was of middle height and great muscular strength; in later life he became very fat; he had a stern countenance, and the front of his head was bald. His demeanour was stately and his court splendid. He was a man of iron will and remarkable genius; no consideration could divert him from the pursuit of his aims, and he was unscrupulous as to the means he employed to attain them. In a large degree his achievements were due to himself alone. Despised in his youth by the proud and restless barons of his duchy, he compelled their obedience and respect, became stronger than his neighbours, extended his dominions by policy and war, conquered a kingdom far richer and larger than his duchy, forced its people to live quietly and orderly under his rule, and, dying a powerful sovereign, left his dominions in peace to his sons. He was religious, was regular in devotion and liberal to monasteries; he fulfilled his vow by building Battle Abbey, which was not finished at his death; he made no gain out of the church, promoted many worthy ecclesiastics, and was blameless in his private life. Though not delighting in cruelty, he was callous to human suffering. In addition to his two signal acts of cruelty, the devastation of the north and the making of the New Forest, he oppressed his conquered people with heavy taxes and brought much misery upon them. While affable to those who gave him no offence, he was stern beyond bounds to those who withstood his will, was merciless in his punishments, and though, with one exception, he took no man's life by sentence of law, inflicted blinding and shameful mutilation with terrible frequency, especially on men of the lower class. Loving "the tall deer as though he had been their father," he decreed that all who slew deer should be blinded; his forest laws troubled rich as well as poor, "but he recked not of the hatred of them all, for they needs must obey his will, if they would have life, or land, or goods, or even his peace."

His rule was strict, and he put down all disorder with a strong hand. That he had at one time some desire to govern the English justly may be inferred from an attempt he made to learn their language; but his con- quest brought temptations, his character seems to have deteriorated as he met with resistance, and, though he was always ready to allow his own will to override justice, he became more tyrannical as he grew older. He amassed great riches by oppression and became avaricious (for his character generally, see A.-S. Chron. an. 1066). Like all his race, he was addicted to legal subtleties; his oppression generally wore the garb of legality, and was for that reason specially grinding. Adopting the character of the lawful successor of the Confessor, he maintained English laws and institutions, continuing, for example, the three annual courts of the earlier kings; but he gave these courts, and indeed all the higher machinery of government and administration, a feudal character, though he kept English feudalism in subordination to the power of the crown (for his use of legal fictions in dealing with English lands, see Freeman, iv. 8?9, v. 15?51). Nor does his surname, ?the Conqueror,? used by Orderic [see Ordericus Vitalis], prove that he laid stress on the fact that he gained and held England by the sword, for the term at that time signified ?an acquirer? or, in legal phraseology, ?a purchaser.? He is generally called ?the Bastard? by contemporary writers, and after the accession of William Rufus is often distinguished from him by being called "the Great" (ib. u.s. ii. 531-3). His laws in their fuller form (Thorpe, Laws, p. 490) cannot be accepted as genuine, but the short version printed by Bishop Stubbs (Select Charters, p. 80), and given with some variations by Hoveden (ii. 216), apparently represents enactments made by him on different occasions, and his confirmation of Canute's law and his regulation of appeals (Thorpe, p. 489) are most probably genuine (see Stubbs's Pref. to Rog. Hov. p. ii, Rolls Ser.). Hoveden, apparently on the authority of Ranulf de Glanville [q. v.], says that in the fourth year of his reign William caused twelve men from each shire to declare on oath the customs of the kingdom. There seems no reason to reject this tradition, though the pretended results of the inquest cannot be accepted as genuine [for William's children, see under Matilda, (d. 1083)]. Assertions that he had any illegitimate children or was unfaithful to his wife lack historical basis.

[The life of William is exhaustively related in Freeman's Norman Conquest, vols. ii. iii. iv., with which should be read Bishop Stubbs's Const. Hist. i. cc. 9, 11, and reference may be made to Palgrave's brilliant, though not always trustworthy, Normandy and England, vol. iii.; Lappenberg's England under Norman Kings, transl. by Thorpe, and parts of M. de Crozal's Lanfranc. The principal original authorities are: Will. of Poitiers, the Conqueror's chaplain, ed. Giles, violently anti-English, ending about 1067; Will. of Jumièges, ed. Duchesne, though much of lib. vii. is the work of Robert of Torigni, after 1135; A.-S. Chron. ed. Plummer. For the battle of Hastings: the Bayeux tapestry; Guy of Amiens ap. Mon. Hist. Brit.; the poem of Bishop Baudri, ed. Delisle, ap. Mém. de la Société des Antiq. de Normandie, av. 1873, xxviii; a little later come Orderic, ed. Duchesne, and, better, ed. Prévost ap. Société de l'Histoire de France; Geoffrey Gaimar's French Poem (Chron. Anglo-Norm. vol. i.); Flor. Wig.; Eadmer's Hist. Nov., ed. Migne; Will. of Malmesbury's Gesta Regum (Rolls Ser.); Sym. Dunelm. (Rolls Ser.); Wace's Roman de Rou (temp. Hen. II), ed. Andresen.]
 
Normandie, William I de King of England (I10867)
 
2198 William Thomas Huguley, Georgia.

William T. Huguley died at the Davis-Fischer Sanitarium in Atlanta, Ga., on May 25, 1919. He was buried at his old home of West Point. During the last twehty years of his life Brother Huguley resided in New York and Washington, and was well known to K. A.'s in Georgia and the East. He is survived by three brothers, one of whom is Geo. Abner Huguley, of Nu Chapter, a prominent merchant of West Point, Ga. Brother Huguley graduated at the University of Georgia in 1875 and was Secretary of the 8th Convention, held at Athens, Ga., in July, 1877. He always maintained a lively interest in the fraternity. 
Huguley, William Thomas (I10410)
 
2199 William Weatherford, Jr. claimed the estate of his father in an action that was eventually considered by the Alabama Supreme Court. Weatherford v. Weatherford, 20 Ala. 548, 56 Am.Dec. 206 (Ala. 1852. The administrator, Charles Weatherford, is William's eldest son by Mary "Polly" Moniac, William Sizemore the husband of Levetia Moniac, Weatherford's niece (i.e., the daughter of Sam Moniac and Elizabeth Weatherford) and Susan Sizemore (nee Stiggins) the sister of Mary. William Hollinger was raised in the household of Weatherford's half-brother, David Tate, who was most probably maternally related. If Elizabeth Moniac is Weatherford's sister (the wife of Sam Moniac), her testimony would have dashed any hope that Weatherford, Jr. entertained for obtaining a share of the estate.

Of interest are the following findings:

"It is not shown that William Weatherford, the elder, ever saw the complainant [William, Jr.]. On the contrary, it is proved that Superlamy [Sapoth] left his residence in Baldwin county while she was pregnant with the complainant, and never returned; and that the complainant was brought by a relative to the residence of Mary Weatherford, formerly Mary Stiggins, after the death of his mother, and subsequent to the death of said Weatherford; so that the record totally fails to furnish any evidence of filiation, arising from the treatment or recognition of the complainant by William Weatherford, senior.

The proof also sufficiently establishes that Mary Stiggins, alias Weatherford, raised complainant and sent him to school, and said to several witnesses that he was the son of William Weatherford; also, that her children by Weatherford called him 'brother,' and treated him as a half-brother. But the proof, coupled with the answers, clearly preponderates to establish the position, that neither she nor her children ever recognized him as the legitimate offspring of said deceased. Lucretia Sizemore says, Mary Weatherford did not recognize him as a legitimate son of William Weatherford.

Susan Sizemore says, he was not regarded as an heir.

William Sizemore says, Mrs Mary Weatherford did not own him as a lawful son, and that while her children recognized him as a brother, they did not regard him as one of the heirs.

These witnesses were examined by the complainant, and the only proof to show that he was regarded otherwise than as illegitimate by the family, is made by Samuel and Lucretia Edmunds, and they only prove that he was regarded in the family as William Weatherford's son, without stating whether as his legitimate or illegitimate son.

* * *

It would unnecessarily swell this opinion, to copy the evidence afforded by the depositions of the several witnesses upon this head. Samuel and Lucretia Ed-monds, and Susan Sizemore state, that they (Weatherford and Superlamy) were reputed to be man and wife in the neighborhood in which they lived; whereas, on the other hand, William Sizemore, Lucretia Sizemore, Gilbert C. Russell and William Hollinger prove that the connection was reputed to be illicit. Elizabeth Moniac proves that Weatherford 'took up' with this woman at the 'Holy Ground,' where the Indians were generally assembled after the massacre at Fort Mims, during the war, and that complainant was always reputed to be a bastard. This proof fails to show that complainant's claim to legitimacy, as deducible from reputation, can be sustained.

There is no proof of actual marriage according to the Indian customs; and the presumption of an actual marriage from the fact of cohabitation is rebutted by the fact of a subsequent permanent separation, with-out any apparent cause, and the marriage in solemn form of Weatherford to Mary Stiggins, which took place shortly after the separation." 
Family F1384
 
2200 WILLIE M'DAVID HAS PASSED AWAY

END CAME PEACEFULLY FRIDAY EVENING AT HOME OF HIS MOTHER--FUNERAL TO-MORROW AFTERNOON AT 3 O'CLOCK--INTERMENT AT ST. JOHN'S

Willie McDavid is dead. The end came peacefully at 6:15 o'clock yesterday evening at the home of Mrs. McDavid's mother, Mrs. A. Ferrara, on East Zarragossa street between Florida Blanca and Cevallos streets, after a lingering illness from acute Bright's disease.

Mr. McDavid was 18 years of age and had spent the major portion of his life in this city and though his death was not unexpected it was a shock to those of his friends who heard of it last night. He was born in Baldwin county, Alabama, but when eight years of age was brought to this city by his parents, his father having been the late R. M. Mcdavid, than whom no citizen was more respected and beloved by all classes of citizens.

Will McDavid was one of those whole souled, genial, generous characters whose personality irresistibly drew one to him, hence his friends in Pensacola, where he was best known, were legion and no young man has been consigned to the tomb in this city for a great number of years who has been more universally mourned that will he be when he is laid to rest in St. John's cemetery, where both his parents and a sister sleep, at 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

For a number of years Mr. McDavid was a civil service clerk in the registry and money order departments of the local post office, and upon his excellent record there he secured an appointment to the department of disbursements on the Panama canal work about two years ago, where he remained until some four or five weeks since when he returned to spend his vacation allowance for two year's service. He had been ill with the dread malady which caused his death for almost a year during his residence on the canal zone. Arriving at home, he improved at first, but about two weeks ago had a set back which forced him to take his bed, which he never left.

He is survived by his wife, who was the youngest daughter of Mrs. A. Ferrara, one sister, Mrs. Aubrey Maura, and three half sisters, all residents of this city.

The funeral services will be held at the residence of Mrs. Ferrara, 515 East Zarragossa street, at 2:30 o'clock Rev. Thomas M. Callaway of the First Baptist church officiating.
The following gentlemen will act as pallbearers: Wylie McDavid, A.P. Yniestra, Fred Stearns, W.C. Jones, B.B. Clegg and William A. Blumer.

Source: Pensacola Evening News, 10 October 1908, Page 7. 
McDavid, William Henry (I16253)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 40 41 42 43 44 45 Next»