Southern Anthology

Families on the Frontiers of the Old South

Notes


Matches 2,151 to 2,200 of 2,398

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2151 The progenitor of the Benefield and Hexton branch and the Midgham and Cowdray branch. Poyntz, Capt. Newdigate (I1713)
 
2152 The Queen and her two daughters died during the siege of Acre. Jerusalem, Sibylle of Queen of Jerusalem (I19309)
 
2153 The region from the Duero river to the Cantabrian mountains was a depopulated buffer zone created by Alfonso I to sperate the the kingdom of Asturias from the Moors to the south. The area was repopulated a century later during the Repoblación (resettlement) initiated by Ordoño I of Asturias (850-866). Asturias, Alfonso I de King of Asturias (I18963)
 
2154 The relationship between Diego, Ero and Gudesteo Fernández has not been proved Family F5898
 
2155 The second Battle of Ramla (or Ramleh) took place on 17 May 1102 between the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Fatimids of Egypt. Blois, Etienne-Henri II de Comte de Blois (I11396)
 
2156 The second Welsh campaign of Edward's reign began with the sacking of Hawarden Castle and the abduction of Robert de Clifford by Dafydd ap Guffudd. His brother, Llywelyn was reluctantly brought into the war. The rebellion faltered with the death of the prince of Wales at Builth in November and Dafydd found himself on the run, only to be captured in June 1283. Edward I King of England (I10782)
 
2157 The seige of the Muslim stronghold was broken by the quarelling of the competing Christian factions over whether the city would be awarded as a fief of Antioch (Reynald de Châtillon) or Jerusalem (Baldwin III) to Thierry. Lorraine, Thierry I de Count of Flanders (I11152)
 
2158 The Sheriff of Kent advised that homage had been received by the king from Chilham's widow.  FitzRoy, Richard Baron of Chilham (I11415)
 
2159 The Shi'a Fatamids found themselves under increasing pressure from the Sunni north. To meet the threat, an alliance was brokered with Latin Jerusalem. It was short-lived, however. Sensing an advantage, Almaric turned on his allies, massacred the inhabitants of Bilbais and then marched his army to Cairo. Betrayed, the Fatamids turned to Nur al-Din. Almaric had overplayed his hand; his grasping policy ultimately led to the deposition of the Egyptian caliphate and the installation of Zangid rule in the person of the Kurd Yussuf ibn Ayyub, Salah al-DinJerusalem, Almaric I of King of Jerusalem (I1987)
 
2160 The Sixty-first regiment was organized at Pollard in September, 1863, and formed part of Clanton's brigade until the following January, when it was sent to Virginia and took the place of the Twenty-sixth in Battle's brigade.

It was in Mobile in December, and in January, 1864, was sent to Orange Court House. It was under fire at the Wilderness with severe loss, and distinguished itself by the capture of a battery, and by a most desperate and successful attack upon General Jenkins and his New York zouaves.

After fighting at Spottsylvania and Second Cold Harbor, it moved into Maryland with General Early. It lost heavily at Snicker's Gap, Winchester and Fisher's Hill; was in the trenches at Petersburg and engaged during the retreat to Appomattox, where it surrendered, 27 strong, under Capt. A. B. Fannin.

It was commanded successively by Col. W. G. Swanson, Lieut.-Col. L. H. Hill, Maj. W. E. Pinckard and Capt. Augustus B. Fannin Jr. Lieutenant-Colonel Hill, Major Pinckard and Capt. W. H. Philpot were captured at Petersburg.

Capt. A. B. Fannin, Jr., was wounded at Cold Harbor and Winchester. Capt. James W. Fannin was captured at Spottsylvania, and Capt. A. F. Zachary was wounded there. Capt. A. J. Slaughter was wounded at Snicker's Gap, Capt. A. D. McCaskill was killed at the Wilderness, and Capt. J. J. Joiner was killed at Hare's Hill.

Source: Confederate Military History, vol. VIII, p. 229


 
Zachry, Capt. (C.S.A.) Alfred Flournoy (I3234)
 
2161 The Sizemore family was established in the Tensaw by the late eighteenth century. According to Vickery and Travis, Arthur Sizemore was the progenitor of the Baldwin County Sizemores and haled from South (others say North) Carolina. In a 10 Dec 1818 affidavit where claim is made under the Treaty of Ft. Jackson, Sizemore identifies himself as "a half breed and Indian countryman." His wife, Mary "Polly" Bailey, was also of European-Creek descent and related to the McGillivrays, Tates, and Moniacs, being a member of the Wind clan. (Polly's siblings, Dixon and Peggy, figured in the massacre at Ft. Mims.)

The Sizemores had ten children. Mary's will (dated 1860) lists children as follows: 1. Cynthia Padgett; 2. Amelia Stiggins; 3. Celia Colbert; 4. William Sizemore; 5. Absolom Sizemore; 6. Nancy Moniac; 7. Samuel Sizemore; and 8. Betsy Tarvin. Arthur's estate administrator (the returns being dated 10 May 1858) reports 5 children who pre-deceased him: William, Absolom, Joseph, Nancy and Samuel. Each child inherited per stirpes. 
Sizemore, Arthur (I5713)
 
2162 The Southern Christian Advocate (Charleston, S.C.: 9 Jan 1877)

By Rev. D. J. Myrick, January 2, 1877, in Griffin, Ga., Rev. J. H. Daniel, of Heard county, Ga., to Miss Emma McDowell, of Griffin, Ga.

 
Family F1149
 
2163 THE SOUTHERN CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 1867-1878,
Issue of February 26, 1878

Dr. John Fletcher Moreland was born in Putnam county, Ga., March 20, 1817; died in LaGrange, Ga., at the residence of his son-in-law, Major D. N. Speer, January 30, 1878. He was a member of the House of Representatives from Heard county in 1851 and 1852, and a member of the Senate in 1856. Dr. Moreland married Mrs. S. A. Amoss until her death the 16th of last month. 
Moreland, John Fletcher (I12152)
 
2164 The spouse of Cadell ap Rhodri is unknown. Family F3344
 
2165 The spouse of Einion ap Owain is unknown. Family F3340
 
2166 The spouse of Gronw ap Einion is unknown. Family F3341
 
2167 The spouse of Merfyn is disputed. He was married to either Ethyll ferch Cynan of Gwynedd or Nest ferch Cadell of Powys. Cawley offers that "it is possible that both Ethyll and Nest were not historical figures at all but were invented to legitimise claims to Gwynedd and Powys, respectively, in the eyes of successor generations of kings and their supporters." Family F3346
 
2168 The spouse of Meurug ap Llywarch is unknown. Family F3347
 
2169 The spouse of Owain ap Hywel is unkown. Family F3342
 
2170 The spouse of Thomas II is debated. Family F0505
 
2171 The State of Alabama Butler County

The following contains a correct list of the heirs and distributees of W W Reddoch dec'd to wit Hetty A P. Missouri J. Josephine. Abigail C. Rachel F. Wm L. and John H Reddoch all of whom are minors under the age of twenty one years and Sarah W Reddoch widow of deceased. -- all of the above reside in the county and state aforesaid.

This day came S W Reddoch and Uriah Evans Adms on the estate of W W Reddoch dec'd being duly sworn says that the foregoing list is true to the best of their knowledge and belief, Sworn to and subscribed before me August 22, 1856

Uriah Evans
Sarah M Reddoch

S. J. Bolling
Judge of Probate
 
Reddoch, William W (I17257)
 
2172 The Stones were very successful planters in Alabama's Black Belt. By 1860, Warren Stone owned 79 slaves and his land holdings have been estimated at over 1200 acres. His eldest brother, Barton Warren Stone, owned 3 houses and over 7000 acres of land in Montgomery and Autauga counties. The family operated a cotton gin and a wharf on the Alabama River at Burkville. The 1862 value of the Stone plantations was approximately $5 million in 2002 dollars.

Warren Thomas and Cornelia were the last of the Stones to occupy Magnolia Crest, the plantation which Warren inherited from his father. After the Civil War, Warren and Cornelia moved to Texas. 
Meriwether, Cornelia V. (I5302)
 
2173 The strategic aim of the Fifth Crusade was to obtain Jerusalem by conquering Egypt. It began with siege of the Upper Nile city of Damietta which was starved into submission 18 months after being invested. The Egyptian defenders simply withdrew deeper into the hinterland. The Crusaders followed, but, unfamiliar with their surroundings, soon found themselves wallowing helplessly in the rising flood of the Nile. Forced to sue for peace, surrender was unconditional. The Latins were left empty-handed. Brienne, Jean de King of Jerusalem, Latin Emperor of Constantinople (I19449)
 
2174 The suffix "épouse de Cambrai" is used for database control only. Ada-Adriana épouse de Cambrai (I19606)
 
2175 The suffix épouse de Cambrai is used for database control only. Ermentrude épouse de Cambrai (I19610)
 
2176 The synod was called to address the rise of the Lollards and expressly condemned the twenty-four theses of John Wycliffe. (Wycliffe had a powerful ally in John of Gaunt.) de Courtenay, William Archbishop of Canterbury (I11042)
 
2177 The Treaty of Le Goulet was John I's opening gambit to secure his continental holdings after coming to power. By it, he conceded much of the Vexin to the French king, Philip Augustus (earning the sobriquet, Softsword); however, he gained the isolation, at least temporarily, of his nephew Arthur and French recognition of the legitimacy of his fiefs. In this, Philip gained the upper hand: he could now use any perceived failure of John to keep faith as a pretext to move against Normandy, which he did with the revolt of the Poitevins in 1202. John I King of England (I10786)
 
2178 The Tunstall house was built around 1820. The 4th US Infantry Regiment was barracked at a cantonment built in the vicinity in 1817. The 4th was removed to Pensacola in 1821. Tate, Eloisa Matilda (I5025)
 
2179 The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume IIV
P
Paca, William
page 161

OWSLEY, William, governor of Kentucky, was born in Virginia in 1782; son of William and Catharine (Bolin) Owsley; grandson of Thomas and Mary (Middleton) Owsley, and a descendant of the Rev. John and Dorothea (Poyntz) Owsley. He removed to Lincoln in 1783 with his parents; taught school and served as deputy sheriff, his father being sheriff of Lincoln county; studied law under John Boyle, and established a successful practice in Lancaster, Garrard county. He served in both branches of the state legislature several terms, and was a judge of the state supreme court, 1812-28. He maintained the principle of anti-repudiation advocated by Henry Clay in 1824, and remained firm when the majority in the state legislature tried to abolish the supreme bench, which act was declared unconstitutional by the U.S. supreme court. In 1828 he resumed the practice of law, again represented Garrard county in the state legislature and served on the bench of the court of appeals. Retiring from the practise of law in 1843, he lived on a farm near Danville, Ky., and in 1844 was elected by the Whig party governor of Kentucky, defeating Col. William O. Butler, Democrat, and re-elected in 1846, serving, 1844-48. Owsley county, Ky. was named in his honor. Centre college conferred upon him the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1843. He died in Danville, Ky., Dec. 9, 1862.[p.161] 
Owsley, William (I1610)
 
2180 The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume VII
Paca, William
page 161

OWSLEY, William, governor of Kentucky, was born in Virginia in 1782; son of William and Catharine (Bolin) Owsley; grandson of Thomas and Mary (Middleton) Owsley, and a descendant of the Rev. John and Dorothea (Poyntz) Owsley. He removed to Lincoln in 1783 with his parents; taught school and served as deputy sheriff, his father being sheriff of Lincoln county; studied law under John Boyle, and established a successful practice in Lancaster, Garrard county. He served in both branches of the state legislature several terms, and was a judge of the state supreme court, 1812-28. He maintained the principle of anti-repudiation advocated by Henry Clay in 1824, and remained firm when the majority in the state legislature tried to abolish the supreme bench, which act was declared unconstitutional by the U.S. supreme court. In 1828 he resumed the practice of law, again represented Garrard county in the state legislature and served on the bench of the court of appeals. Retiring from the practise of law in 1843, he lived on a farm near Danville, Ky., and in 1844 was elected by the Whig party governor of Kentucky, defeating Col. William O. Butler, Democrat, and re-elected in 1846, serving, 1844-48. Owsley county, Ky. was named in his honor. Centre college conferred upon him the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1843. He died in Danville, Ky., Dec. 9, 1862. [p.161] 
Owsley, Gov. William (I1615)
 
2181 The War Without Love was the unsuccessful rebellion of Queen Eleanor, Henry the Young King, Richard and Geoffrey against Henry II. It was precipitated by the award of three castles to seal the contract of marriage between five-year-old John and the daughter of Hubert, Count of Maurienne, a gift that offended the underemployed young Henry. The family was joined by Louis VII and William the Lion. "That Henry survived is a testament to his abilities as a military commander and the loyalty of the core of his administration, but it was a near-disastrous event for both him and the lands over which he ruled." Church. Henry II King of England (I10825)
 
2182 The will is dated at Montpelier (Blacksher) on 1 Jul 1843. The beneficiaries are her three sons and three sons-in-law: Francis Earle (who appears to have received the bulk of the estate); James Earle; John Earle; Josephus Myles; Edward Stedham; and Joel McDavid. The named slaves are Solomon, Elcy (f), June (m), York, Lettuice (f), and Dicy (f). Elijah Tarvin was named the executor of the estate. Tarvin, Elizabeth (I9508)
 
2183 The will of Benjamin Stedham was admitted to the county court for Baldwin County, Alabama by Judge Patrick Byrne on 13 Jul 1829. Stedham, Benjamin (I13575)
 
2184 The will of James Earle was received by Judge Patrick Byrne of the County Court of Baldwin County, Alabama, on 24 Sep 1836. The will was recorded 4 Oct 1836. Sons were identified as James, John, William, Richard, Francis and Alexander. Daughters were identified as Rachel Myles, Nancy Stedham, and Margaret McDavid.  Earle, James (I9507)
 
2185 The will of Shadrack Dickinson was made October 28, 1818, in Wayne County, North Carolina and probated on Febraury 6, 1819.

In the Name of God Amen: I Shadrack Dickinson of the County of Wayne & State of North Carolina do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament revoking all others being in Sound mind & memory. It is my wish and desire that all my children to wit MARTHA SIMMS, ELIZABETH STANTON, POLLY THOMAS, SALLY JERNIGAN, PATIENCE TURNER, JAMES DICKINSON, PENELOPE BARNES, WILLIAM DICKINSON and SUSANNAH EDMONDSON shall have an equal part of all my whole Estate that is consisting[:] Lands, negroes and money [etc?] with the Exception of my Daughter Polley Thomas's part of the negroes which I have now in [possession], it is my wish and desire after the valuation of said negroes that her part be made up to her in money or good notes of hand and the said negroes equally divided between the above name Eight Heirs with the exception of my negro man Jacob & his wife [Jinny?] shall be valued at [?] Hundred dollars and my negro man Harry shall be valued at three Hundred dollars, and without any [computation?] shall have their choice of said Eight Heirs for their Master or Mistress, and the said Four Hundred dollars to be paid in good Notes as the other part of said Estate, it is my wish + desire that all the negroes and perishable property which already has been given to said nine Heirs be valued at the time when said property was [?] and also three Hundred Acres of Land deeded to my son James - also three Hundred Acres of Land deeded to my daughter Patience valued at this time, it is also my wish and desire after all my Just debts are paid that all the residue of my Estate be Equally divided between the above named nine Heirs by JOEL NEWSOM [?] & ARTHUR BARDIN which I ordain and appoint also my Executors to this my last will and Testament. Oct. 28th 1818.

Shadrack Dickinson

Signed Sealed & acknowledged
in the presence of
William Dickinson
Henry T. Stanton

Wayne County Feby Term 1819

Then [?] the [?] Will of Shadrack Dickinson duly proved in open Court by the oath of William Dickinson and Henry T. Stanton Subscribing Witnesses thereto and at the same time Joel Newsom [div.?] + Arthur Bardin [qual?] as [E?] to the same.

[Tish?] P. Hooks [?]
Feb. 6 1819

* * * *

Shadrack & Chiziah Dickinson Bible Record - Wayne Co., N.C.

Note: This Bible was brought from N.C. by Patience Dickinson Turner when she came to Ala. about 1836 with her two sons, Henry Grantham Turner and Benjamin Dickinson Turner, and her daughter, Elizabeth Turner. They first went to Sumter Co., Ala. where she died in 1851. Her will is probated in that county.

Patience Dickinson Turner was the great grandmother of Swepson James Taylor, who was the grandfather of this copier, Mrs. Slater R. (Martha Nelson) Gordon, Rt. 1, Box 20, Florence, Rankin Co., Ms. 39073).

No place of residence is given in this Bible record, but other family papers indicate that the Dickinson family lived in Wayne, Edgecomb and Bertie Counties, N.C. The 1790 Census shows Shadrack Dickinson and Daniel Dickinson living in New Bern Dist., Wayne Co., N.C.

See: Henry G. Turner Bible


Family Record

Marriages

Archelous Barnes & Penelop Dickinson his wife m. 10 June, 1815
Mathew Turner d. 30 Jy, 1818
Benjamin Turner his and and pen 14 Jan, 1820
Patience Daniel d/o Ruffus Daniel and Rebecca his wife was b. 29 May, 1820
Benjamin Daniel Was b. 29 Nov, 1821

Births

Martha Dickinson d/o Shadrack Dickinson & his wife Chiziah was b. 15 May 1772
Elizabeth Dickinson b. 16 April 1774
Mary Dickinson b. 25 Mar 1776
Sally Dickinson b. 30 Dec 1777
Patience Dickinson b. 18 Nov 1779
James Dickinson b. 18 June 1782
William Dickinson b. 25 April 1785
Penelope Dickinson b. 19 June 1786
Susannah Dickinson b. 20 June, 1789
Nancy Dickinson b. 19 Mar, 1794

Calvin Willie Barnes s/o Archelous & Penelope was b. 10 Oct 1816
Washington Barnes was b. 10 Feb, 1888

Willie I. Stanton b. 30 Dec 1774
Elizabeth Dickinson Stanton b. 16 April 1774
Polly Stanton d/o Willie & Elizabeth was b. 9 Dec 1794
Henry T. Stanton b. 17 April 1797
James Stanton b. 17 Mar, 1799
John Stanton b. 16 Mar 1801
Saly Stanton b. 7 Jan 1803
Edwin G. Stanton b. 9 May 1805
Rufus W. T. Stanton b. 25 Oct, 1807
Hubbard D. Stanton b. 2 Jan 1810
Warren G. Stanton b. 5 Sept 1812

Rufus W. Edmonds was b. 21 Jan 1818

Chiziah Dickinson d. 21 Sept 1811

Jonathan Dickinson s/o Daniel & Zilpha was b. 27 June, 1805
Laurence Dickinson was b. 5 Oct, 1807
James Dickinson was b. 27 Jan, 1810
Silas Hollowell Dickinson was b. 11 Mar, 1812 ; d. 10 Oct, 1813
William Dickinson was b. 11 Jan, 1815
Penelope Dickinson was b. 3 Aug, 1817

Rebecca Turner d/o Mathew & Patience was b. 13 Sept, 1802
Benjamin Turner was b. 4 Nov, 1804
Saley Turner was b. 29 Feb, 1807
Henry Grantham Turner was b. 23 Dec, 1808
Penelope Turner was b. 15 Jan, 1810
Susanna Turner was b. 3 Feb, 1813
Elizabeth Turner was b. 26 June, 1816

Mathew Turner d. 31 Jy, 1818
S. Dickinson d. 15 Jan, 1819

http://www.rootsweb.com/~msgenweb/archives/rankin-bible4.html
09/27/2004 
Dickinson, Shadrack (I0132)
 
2186 The will of William Dickinson of Wayne County, North Carolina, identifies a daughter, Mary Dickinson, and a son, William. The will also identifies his three youngest heirs (children?) as Mary, Elizabeth, and James.

Will of William DICKINSON of Wayne Co.

Posted by Vikki Hollowell Highfield on Sat, 28 Nov 1998

Surname: DICKINSON, PEACOCK, JONES, NORVELL

In the Name of God Amen. I WILLIAM DICKINSON of the County of Wayne and State of North Carolina Being weak of Body but of a Sound and perfect memory of mind Blessed be god do this 18th Day of the 10th Month in the year of our lord one thousand Eight hundred and Twenty one make and publis this my last will and Testament in manner and form following (Viz): I give and Bequeath unto my Daughter MARY DICKINSON Eighty Dollars one feather Bed and furniture. I give and Bequeath unto my son WILLIAM DICKINSON the land whereon he now lives up to the Briery Branch and a line of marked trees to Bishops Corner. I leave all the Rest of my land above the said Branch and line of Marked trees, Stock, household and kitchen furniture to be Sold and Wqueally Divided Between my three youngest heirs, MARY, ELIZABETH, and JAMES DICKINSON, after the payment of my just Debts. And I hereby make and ordain my son WILLIAM DICKINSON & SIMON PEACOCK Executors to this my last will and Testament in witness whereof I the said WILLIAM DICKINSON the Testator have to this my last will and Testament Set my hand and seal the Day and year above written. WILLIAM DICKINSON. Signed Sealed published and Declared in presence of us who were present at the time of Signing and Sealing thereof. Test: JOHN JONES, JAMES NORVELL. Wayne County [NC], February Term 1822. There was the written Will of WILLIAM DICKINSON duly proved in open Court by the oaths of JOHN JONES and JAMES NORVELL subscribing witnesses and at the same Time WILLIAM DICKINSON, JR. and SIMON PEACOCK Qualified as executors thereto and let letters of Testamentry issue. Test: P. HOOKS, Clk. (Wayne Co., NC Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Feb. Term 1822).

* * * *

Children and dates appear at Volume I, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy (Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing 1978) pp. 285, 304. 
Dickinson, William (I0004)
 
2187 The year of birth for John is approximated by consulting the dates of birth given on the headstones of siblings Elizabeth (1841) and Clark (1844). The birth order is consistent in the 1850 and 1860 census enumerations. The Dickinson homestead became a part of Spalding County upon its creation in 1851. Dickinson, John Franklin (I0069)
 
2188 The Young King met his end while campaigning to oust his brother Richard from the Duchy of Aquitaine, where the latter was deeply unpopular. Frustration over his powerless, landless position as king-in-waiting again turned to action. Henry I initially sat out the hostilities but a felled horse at Limoges, where he went to parlay with his son, sent the Old King directly into the arms of Richard.  Younger, Henry the Duke of Normandy (I10831)
 
2189 Then Morgan County, Georgia. Newton County was created on 24 Dec 1821. Burge, Wiley (I16359)
 
2190 Then Newton County. Smith, Rev. George Gilman (I18309)
 
2191 Then Pike County, Georgia. Winbray, Charles William (I15793)
 
2192 Then Pike County, Georgia.  Burge, Eliza (I3075)
 
2193 Then Pike county. Spalding county was created in 1851. Blanton, William Parks (I0589)
 
2194 Then Virginia. Lipps, Nannie (I18313)
 
2195 Then, Baldwin County, Alabama Hubbird, Susan (I0869)
 
2196 Then, Pike County, Georgia. Leake, Garlington (I3068)
 
2197 There is a Julia A Browning, age 13, Mississippi birthplace, in the 1850 Baldwin County household of William and Lizzy McGee. Browning, Julia (I5800)
 
2198 There is a Julia Browning, mulatto, in the Baldwin County household of Lizzie McGee, age 47. Browning has an infant, Josephine. Browning, Julia (I5800)
 
2199 There is no evidence that Miss McDowell ever married. In 1940 she was reported to be single and living with her "partner" Nell Bennett. She also appears with Bennett in the 1930 census. Miss Bennett was from Barnesville, Georgia. McDowell, Marcia Jane (I1773)
 
2200 There is one other Reeves family in Autauga County (Coosada) in 1850: George Reeves, age 54; Elizabeth, 44; George, 22; Mary A E ,19; Martha H, 17; Wm S, 15; John C, 13; Francis L, 10; and Caroline B, 7.
 
Reeves, Richard (I18233)
 

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